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OT: No more Hollinger at ESPN

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Re: OT: No more Hollinger at ESPN 

Post#16 » by Badgerlander » Fri Dec 14, 2012 4:10 pm

http://www.sbnation.com/2012/12/14/3766 ... -analytics

pretty interesting article

John Hollinger is not the first of what you'd call the "basketball quants" to ascend to an NBA front office. This has been going on for years and years. Dean Oliver, the godfather of the movement, worked for the Sonics and Nuggets before becoming ESPN's top numbers person. (Oliver wrote the bible on the subject, Basketball on Paper, a decade ago.) Roland Beech has worked for the Mavericks. The great Kevin Pelton has done it from both sides: he was the beat writer for Sonics.com, infusing quantitative analysis where possible, before later doing some quant work for the Pacers. Aaron Barzilai did work for the Grizzlies before joining the Sixers this year. David Lewin does work for the Cavaliers. There are numerous others, former and current.

And, of course, there are two more in major positions of power: Mike Zarren, the assistant general manager of the Celtics and a now constant candidate for open GM jobs, as well as Daryl Morey, the GM of the Rockets.

I'm reminded of a tale from Rick Adelman's days in Houston. Morey's team would deliver lengthy scouting reports to the team and coaching staff well before a game. It'd have player tendencies, shooting charts, instructions on match-up advantages -- everything you could ask for to prep for a game. And out of all of the coaches and all of the players only two - Shane Battier and Chuck Hayes - would devour the reports. The rest (Adelman included) would leaf through, pretend to care and go play ball. That story might be an exaggeration on the part of the person who told it, but even if that's the case, it shows how important accessibility is. You can build the world's greatest performance model. And if you can't explain what it means to the people using it, it's worthless.
"The bottom line is this: The closer you get to the basket, the bigger a threat you are.”-Jason Kidd
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Re: OT: No more Hollinger at ESPN 

Post#17 » by ReasonablySober » Fri Dec 14, 2012 4:15 pm

I had a different conclusion reading that: some players just don't give a ****.
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Re: OT: No more Hollinger at ESPN 

Post#18 » by Badgerlander » Fri Dec 14, 2012 4:34 pm

and some old school coaches apparently, but it's going to get more and more prevalent, the Timberwolves added the sport-vu camera system this offseason
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Re: OT: No more Hollinger at ESPN 

Post#19 » by ReasonablySober » Fri Dec 14, 2012 4:39 pm

DocHoliday wrote:and some old school coaches apparently, but it's going to get more and more prevalent, the Timberwolves added the sport-vu camera system this offseason


Indeed.
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Re: OT: No more Hollinger at ESPN 

Post#20 » by crkone » Fri Dec 14, 2012 5:36 pm

Imagine if NFL teams didn't do film study of opponents.
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Re: OT: No more Hollinger at ESPN 

Post#21 » by humanrefutation » Fri Dec 14, 2012 5:48 pm

DrugBust wrote:I had a different conclusion reading that: some players just don't give a ****.


I don't know if its that or if some players just don't know how to use that type of data and infuse that into their game. One of the things I've learned in my experience is that people often ignore information - even if its highly relevant and valuable - if they don't understand it. Once you work with them to understand it and its value, most will jump at the chance to make themselves better at what they do.

That's where the coaches have to come in and make that type of data a part of their game plan - but if even they struggle to apply that data, then you run into an issue where a front office is data-infused whereas a coaching staff is not. There needs to be symmetry - at least with some of the coaches, if not all of them - in how data is compiled and utilized to best inform their players of what it takes to win.

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