Interesting article on Black Players In Utah

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Re: RE: Re: Interesting article on Black Players In Utah 

Post#201 » by E-Balla » Sun Mar 19, 2017 8:39 pm

SK21209 wrote:
E-Balla wrote:
Nate505 wrote:So what's your definition of racist, and what separates the 10% of whites who are not?

My definition of racist goes as far as you treating someone differently or acting differently around people of different races. What separates the other 10% is that they act comfortable, don't really change up when they're around different people, and if they did and you said something about it they actually listen and don't respond with hostility like the poster right after you. That's not something easy to achieve when you're raised in the US and constantly taught to be hostile towards people of color in all situations.


That's a pretty ridiculous statement.

It isn't and its a shame you think it is.
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Re: Interesting article on Black Players In Utah 

Post#202 » by shoefly1 » Sun Mar 19, 2017 8:44 pm

I wish people would actually read this excellent article. It gives a nuanced and fair assessment of player's experiences in Utah and to simply describe is as either racist, or not racist is reductive and unfair. There are clearly cultural differences, for some people they are easier to deal with, for others less so. People should be allowed to express their experience without other people telling them it's invalid.

As one of the players in the article says, someone who likes living in Utah,"

“What I don’t like from people here, especially white people, is when they say they don’t understand why blacks don’t want to come here to play. They don’t have any right to speak on that,” Boone said.
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Re: Black Players In Utah 

Post#203 » by alebaba » Sun Mar 19, 2017 9:56 pm

pastis wrote:
TheKingOfVa360 wrote:
koogiking wrote:Im a so called young black urban youth and personally I think places like Denver, Utah Minnesota etc. are pretty cool. As long as the people are welcoming, accepting. Actually pretty nice, chill low key different.

I think NBA players most importantly want to win and get paid. Being in a small market isnt really that big of a concern, except for a few individuals(Dwight, Melo etc.) NBA players seem to like it. You won't have papparazi up your ass. You can bring your family and friends there to so it's not like its really nothing to do. Night Clubs are overrated. I don't like them And on the road you can always go out anyway if you really want to do that stuff


It's not all about the night clubs. Black players want to be able to have good food, get a good hair cut, meet new people of a similar backgrounds. A lot of players aren't into the night club scene.


is this ironic? a good haircut for blacks? And you dont think that you can find 8$ barber shops in salt lake city or what? 99% of the black nba players have either a shaved head or a haircut for what you just need a electric razor. In fact not only nba players but 99% of the black men in general. Meet people of a similar background? imagine a white would say that


You def know nothing about haircut. lol 8$ haircut would give you bad fades/taper and edge up. I bet you're probably sporting a pretty bad fade and think its a good hair cut. lol
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Re: RE: Re: Interesting article on Black Players In Utah 

Post#204 » by Winglish » Sun Mar 19, 2017 10:22 pm

E-Balla wrote:
Nate505 wrote:
E-Balla wrote:You black? If not you probably don't get it but being black in America means you have tons in common with each other no matter what background you personally have. That's just the way the country is. In my personal experience I'll flat out say 90% of white people I've met are racist. Not that they notice it or are consciously racist but that's just life growing up in the US - it's conditioning.

So what's your definition of racist, and what separates the 10% of whites who are not?

My definition of racist goes as far as you treating someone differently or acting differently around people of different races. What separates the other 10% is that they act comfortable, don't really change up when they're around different people, and if they did and you said something about it they actually listen and don't respond with hostility like the poster right after you. That's not something easy to achieve when you're raised in the US and constantly taught to be hostile towards people of color in all situations.


I am not black. The closest experience I bring is that my sister married interracially and she and my brother-in-law have three beautiful and awesome kids together as well as a 4th adopted child. I highlighted the sentence above because it makes me curious. I have never once been taught to be hostile to anyone or even heard of that kind of thing ever happening to anyone I know, but then that was not the environment I was raised in. I am not blind to history. Does that kind of racist behavior really happen much nowadays? I mean...Really? I sure don't see it reflected in the hundreds of youth I work with every day or toward my nieces and nephews, who are some of the most popular kids at school and friends with groups of all color. But my experience might be atypical because I live in Utah and people here tend to go out of their way to be kind to each other.

Utah = :D

Go Jazz!
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Re: Black Players In Utah 

Post#205 » by E-Balla » Sun Mar 19, 2017 10:25 pm

alebaba wrote:
pastis wrote:
TheKingOfVa360 wrote:
It's not all about the night clubs. Black players want to be able to have good food, get a good hair cut, meet new people of a similar backgrounds. A lot of players aren't into the night club scene.


is this ironic? a good haircut for blacks? And you dont think that you can find 8$ barber shops in salt lake city or what? 99% of the black nba players have either a shaved head or a haircut for what you just need a electric razor. In fact not only nba players but 99% of the black men in general. Meet people of a similar background? imagine a white would say that


You def know nothing about haircut. lol 8$ haircut would give you bad fades/taper and edge up. I bet you're probably sporting a pretty bad fade and think its a good hair cut. lol

He said 99% of players have a shaved head. You know damn well he knows nothing about a good or bad haircut. Your post could've been in an alien language for all he knows. Its cool though its one of those things you don't know about unless you're black and from America.
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Re: RE: Re: Interesting article on Black Players In Utah 

Post#206 » by E-Balla » Sun Mar 19, 2017 10:34 pm

Winglish wrote:
E-Balla wrote:
Nate505 wrote:So what's your definition of racist, and what separates the 10% of whites who are not?

My definition of racist goes as far as you treating someone differently or acting differently around people of different races. What separates the other 10% is that they act comfortable, don't really change up when they're around different people, and if they did and you said something about it they actually listen and don't respond with hostility like the poster right after you. That's not something easy to achieve when you're raised in the US and constantly taught to be hostile towards people of color in all situations.


I am not black. The closest experience I bring is that my sister married interracially and she and my brother-in-law have three beautiful and awesome kids together as well as a 4th adopted child. I highlighted the sentence above because it makes me curious. I have never once been taught to be hostile to anyone or even heard of that kind of thing ever happening to anyone I know, but then that was not the environment I was raised in. I am not blind to history. Does that kind of racist behavior really happen much nowadays? I mean...Really? I sure don't see it reflected in the hundreds of youth I work with every day or toward my nieces and nephews, who are some of the most popular kids at school and friends with groups of all color. But my experience might be atypical because I live in Utah and people here tend to go out of their way to be kind to each other.

Utah = :D

Go Jazz!

You from the US? If so than you have. We all have. Literally not a single person born in the US can avoid it. If you're the generation above me and Reagan was president when you were a child (just for an example) I'd like you to answer these 100% honestly. When I say welfare queen what comes to mind? When I say states' rights what comes to mind? When I say crime what's the first 4 crimes that come to mind?
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Re: RE: Re: Interesting article on Black Players In Utah 

Post#207 » by Winglish » Sun Mar 19, 2017 10:41 pm

E-Balla wrote:
Winglish wrote:
E-Balla wrote:My definition of racist goes as far as you treating someone differently or acting differently around people of different races. What separates the other 10% is that they act comfortable, don't really change up when they're around different people, and if they did and you said something about it they actually listen and don't respond with hostility like the poster right after you. That's not something easy to achieve when you're raised in the US and constantly taught to be hostile towards people of color in all situations.


I am not black. The closest experience I bring is that my sister married interracially and she and my brother-in-law have three beautiful and awesome kids together as well as a 4th adopted child. I highlighted the sentence above because it makes me curious. I have never once been taught to be hostile to anyone or even heard of that kind of thing ever happening to anyone I know, but then that was not the environment I was raised in. I am not blind to history. Does that kind of racist behavior really happen much nowadays? I mean...Really? I sure don't see it reflected in the hundreds of youth I work with every day or toward my nieces and nephews, who are some of the most popular kids at school and friends with groups of all color. But my experience might be atypical because I live in Utah and people here tend to go out of their way to be kind to each other.

Utah = :D

Go Jazz!

You from the US? If so than you have. We all have. Literally not a single person born in the US can avoid it. If you're the generation above me and Reagan was president when you were a child (just for an example) I'd like you to answer these 100% honestly. When I say welfare queen what comes to mind? When I say states' rights what comes to mind? When I say crime what's the first 4 crimes that come to mind?


Welfare queen- I have never heard the term before. I see where you are coming from with that, though. I get it.

States rights- the idiots up in the Utah legislature who want to usurp all of the federal land in Utah for the state to take control of. I hear it used in terms of my field- education- quite often in context with No Child Left Behind laws.

Crime- murder, theft, cheating on taxes, bribery (I have no idea why those came to mind first. Bribery might have been a seed planted in my head by the states rights thoughts. :lol: )
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Re: RE: Re: Interesting article on Black Players In Utah 

Post#208 » by E-Balla » Sun Mar 19, 2017 11:00 pm

Winglish wrote:Welfare queen- I have never heard the term before. I see where you are coming from with that, though. I get it.

That's fine. Its not something in 2017 you hear much outside of Fox News but its a term created by Reagan to get people to vote against their best interests by evoking the imagery of a black woman not working and going on vacations with tax payer money. Don't think I have to explain why I mentioned it though you seem to get it.

States rights- the idiots up in the Utah legislature who want to usurp all of the federal land in Utah for the state to take control of. I hear it used in terms of my field- education- quite often in context with No Child Left Behind laws.

I mentioned states rights because its something that left the lexicon of American politics for a long time for good reason but Reagan brought it back. States' rights first emerged as a phrase in American politics in the 40s as a push back against the budding Civil Rights Movement. By the 60s Strom Thurmond (probably the most famous segregationist) started a political party called States' Rights with the specific goal of keeping segregation legal. They started to rewrite history at this time to get people on their side saying things like "the Civil War was fought over states' rights" and it worked. I can say for a fact that in school that's what we learned (and this is 8th grade I'm thinking of so as recently as 2007 this is what kids learned in major parts of the country).

Now States' rights is meant to mean a ton of things like ending the Department of Education (what you referred to a little with No Child Left Behind) or in the case of places like Indiana allowing people to discriminate against homosexuals. It's used as a buffer against legitimate criticism. "No I don't want to discriminate against homosexuals I just care about states' rights."

Crime- murder, theft, cheating on taxes, bribery (I have no idea why those came to mind first. Bribery might have been a seed planted in my head by the states rights thoughts. :lol: )

:lol: Not gonna lie I've asked people this plenty of times and you're nothing like the usual. Usually rape is up there and bribery/cheating on taxes is 2 I've never heard before so good on you for being different. Still my main point in doing this was that up until now I've never heard bribery/tax evasion, or destruction of property when I ask this question and those are typically white crimes. I usually hear drug usage or dealing, murder, robbery/theft, and rape as answers to that.

Not gonna lie there you definitely took the wind out of my sails on that one but hopefully you can at least get what I mean when I say in the US you're kinda programmed to think one wah about people of color. Seriously my mom is kinda racist and she's black. I constantly have to tell her step back and think for a second about certain situations (the most recent being that video of the Korean shopowner beating up that lady).
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Re: Black Players In Utah 

Post#209 » by EAS Law » Mon Mar 20, 2017 12:12 am

KingDavid wrote:
EAS Law wrote:I think this is an illustration of how young black athletes hold prejudices toward places like Utah because "white people live there" in a twist of irony, where there is an assumption that they will be pre-judged and treated unfairly.

I would imagine that 90% of the posters in this thread have never been to Utah, yet claim that there is no culture there and that it is full of "people that don't look like" these athletes.

It's actually pretty amusing that people are so indoctrinated to believe that prejudice and racial preference only works one way.

Edit: Wow I worded that poorly...

Let me try that again. There was no prejudice involved in this article.

I've never been to Utah or more importantly, slc. I'm sure there's culture there. Just not at the level of diversity I experience daily here in South Florida. Or not enough of a specific culture(s) that some of these athletes grew up being used to. It's not a complaint, it's an observation.

I'm a black guy. While I'd love to visit these types of places, I'm not too keen on living in those types of areas. Not enough speed.

And there is no problem with that at all.

Prejudice just means having a pre-judged opinion in this context. It doesn't have anything to do with race necessarily.

I believe Toronto used to carry this sort of stigma as well until Drake came out--no kidding though. The prejudice was, Canada=white people with no relatable culture. We know now that couldn't be further from the truth.
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Re: Interesting article on Black Players In Utah 

Post#210 » by EAS Law » Mon Mar 20, 2017 12:17 am

shoefly1 wrote:I wish people would actually read this excellent article. It gives a nuanced and fair assessment of player's experiences in Utah and to simply describe is as either racist, or not racist is reductive and unfair. There are clearly cultural differences, for some people they are easier to deal with, for others less so. People should be allowed to express their experience without other people telling them it's invalid.

As one of the players in the article says, someone who likes living in Utah,"

“What I don’t like from people here, especially white people, is when they say they don’t understand why blacks don’t want to come here to play. They don’t have any right to speak on that,” Boone said.

So you are condemning people for dismissing someone's opinion while also praising the idea that a player believes an entire group of people have no right to an opinion based on the color of their skin...

2017 I guess
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Re: RE: Re: Interesting article on Black Players In Utah 

Post#211 » by Eoghan » Mon Mar 20, 2017 12:38 am

E-Balla wrote:
States rights- the idiots up in the Utah legislature who want to usurp all of the federal land in Utah for the state to take control of. I hear it used in terms of my field- education- quite often in context with No Child Left Behind laws.

I mentioned states rights because its something that left the lexicon of American politics for a long time for good reason but Reagan brought it back. States' rights first emerged as a phrase in American politics in the 40s as a push back against the budding Civil Rights Movement. By the 60s Strom Thurmond (probably the most famous segregationist) started a political party called States' Rights with the specific goal of keeping segregation legal. They started to rewrite history at this time to get people on their side saying things like "the Civil War was fought over states' rights" and it worked. I can say for a fact that in school that's what we learned (and this is 8th grade I'm thinking of so as recently as 2007 this is what kids learned in major parts of the country).

Now States' rights is meant to mean a ton of things like ending the Department of Education (what you referred to a little with No Child Left Behind) or in the case of places like Indiana allowing people to discriminate against homosexuals. It's used as a buffer against legitimate criticism. "No I don't want to discriminate against homosexuals I just care about states' rights."

No it didn't. States' rights first emerged most likely in the 10th amendment of the Constitution which is intrinsic with the formation of the US. This nation started out under the Articles of Confederation and the 10th Am. is loosely based on a provision of the Articles that stated thusly:
Each state retains its sovereignty, freedom, and independence, and every power, jurisdiction, and right, which is not by this Confederation expressly delegated to the United States, in Congress assembled.

States' rights have always been a thing, if not the thing, even the name of the country reflects that (United States of America, not just America). Unlike countries like the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (which is neither Democratic, the People's or a Republic), the adjectives of 'United' and 'States' used to be understood as actually accurate. Now it isn't because the effing Federalists put us on this path towards the statist utopia in which we now reside.

I'm not going into the Civil War aspect of your post (it won't end well) suffice to say that your interpretation of the Civil War, like the vast majority of people taught in this subject, is extremely reductionist and monolithic. Saying "the Civil War was fought over State's rights" is no more an errant statement than saying "the Civil War was fought over slavery." They're both accurate depending on what parameters you're setting. Jefferson Davis, the President of the CSA and thus leader of the Southern states attempting to secede from the Union which led to the bloodiest war in the nation's history, was never tried for treason. Why not? State's rights.
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Re: Interesting article on Black Players In Utah 

Post#212 » by shoefly1 » Mon Mar 20, 2017 12:48 am

EAS Law wrote:
shoefly1 wrote:I wish people would actually read this excellent article. It gives a nuanced and fair assessment of player's experiences in Utah and to simply describe is as either racist, or not racist is reductive and unfair. There are clearly cultural differences, for some people they are easier to deal with, for others less so. People should be allowed to express their experience without other people telling them it's invalid.

As one of the players in the article says, someone who likes living in Utah,"

“What I don’t like from people here, especially white people, is when they say they don’t understand why blacks don’t want to come here to play. They don’t have any right to speak on that,” Boone said.

So you are condemning people for dismissing someone's opinion while also praising the idea that a player believes an entire group of people have no right to an opinion based on the color of their skin...

2017 I guess


I recently listened to a radio show where a woman was talking about her discomfort and dislike of being catcalled on the street. She spoke to a man who had catcalled her for hours, trying to communicate her experience to the man. The man she talked to was a nice guy, sweet and charming, but no matter how much she tried, he kept telling her that her experience was wrong, that she should be flattered that he was catcalling her on the street. He told her that it was all in good fun, so she and the vast majority of women who feel the way she does just need to change their way of thinking.

I don't think it's, "2017" to allow people to share their own experience and preferences without telling them they are wrong.. I think it's decency.
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Re: Interesting article on Black Players In Utah 

Post#213 » by Tracymcgoaty » Mon Mar 20, 2017 1:04 am

I dont live in the states but whats wrong with Utah? Boring? I could see if someone lived in New york or LA for most of their life making a change to go to Utah would be rough or am i just lost?
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Re: RE: Re: Interesting article on Black Players In Utah 

Post#214 » by E-Balla » Mon Mar 20, 2017 1:09 am

Eoghan wrote:
E-Balla wrote:
States rights- the idiots up in the Utah legislature who want to usurp all of the federal land in Utah for the state to take control of. I hear it used in terms of my field- education- quite often in context with No Child Left Behind laws.

I mentioned states rights because its something that left the lexicon of American politics for a long time for good reason but Reagan brought it back. States' rights first emerged as a phrase in American politics in the 40s as a push back against the budding Civil Rights Movement. By the 60s Strom Thurmond (probably the most famous segregationist) started a political party called States' Rights with the specific goal of keeping segregation legal. They started to rewrite history at this time to get people on their side saying things like "the Civil War was fought over states' rights" and it worked. I can say for a fact that in school that's what we learned (and this is 8th grade I'm thinking of so as recently as 2007 this is what kids learned in major parts of the country).

Now States' rights is meant to mean a ton of things like ending the Department of Education (what you referred to a little with No Child Left Behind) or in the case of places like Indiana allowing people to discriminate against homosexuals. It's used as a buffer against legitimate criticism. "No I don't want to discriminate against homosexuals I just care about states' rights."

No it didn't. States' rights first emerged most likely in the 10th amendment of the Constitution which is intrinsic with the formation of the US. This nation started out under the Articles of Confederation and the 10th Am. is loosely based on a provision of the Articles that stated thusly:
Each state retains its sovereignty, freedom, and independence, and every power, jurisdiction, and right, which is not by this Confederation expressly delegated to the United States, in Congress assembled.

States' rights have always been a thing, if not the thing, even the name of the country reflects that (United States of America, not just America). Unlike countries like the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (which is neither Democratic, the People's or a Republic), the adjectives of 'United' and 'States' used to be understood as actually accurate. Now it isn't because the effing Federalists put us on this path towards the statist utopia in which we now reside.

No one is talking about the concept of states' rights which were always a thing. I'm talking about the term states' rights as a political term (which is a thing). Yes states have always had rights and the extent of the government has always been debated but that's something different. States' rights has a new meaning now. Kind of like how fake news became a term now but fake news has always been a thing.

I'm not going into the Civil War aspect of your post (it won't end well) suffice to say that your interpretation of the Civil War, like the vast majority of people taught in this subject, is extremely reductionist and monolithic. Saying "the Civil War was fought over State's rights" is no more an errant statement than saying "the Civil War was fought over slavery." They're both accurate depending on what parameters you're setting. Jefferson Davis, the President of the CSA and thus leader of the Southern states attempting to secede from the Union which led to the bloodiest war in the nation's history, was never tried for treason. Why not? State's rights.

1. My whole point was that the Civil War wasn't fought over states' rights but that narrative is what is being taught in schools.

2. The Civil War was fought because the country split. The country split because the Southern States wanted to expand slavery. The Civil War was fought over slavery. There's no if, and, or buts here the declarations of secession made it clear why the southern states wanted to be their own country.

3. Care to expand on the last sentence there because I thought the answer to why not was that the US officially had no citizens. Nothing to do with the rights of the state.
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Re: Interesting article on Black Players In Utah 

Post#215 » by E-Balla » Mon Mar 20, 2017 1:14 am

EAS Law wrote:
shoefly1 wrote:I wish people would actually read this excellent article. It gives a nuanced and fair assessment of player's experiences in Utah and to simply describe is as either racist, or not racist is reductive and unfair. There are clearly cultural differences, for some people they are easier to deal with, for others less so. People should be allowed to express their experience without other people telling them it's invalid.

As one of the players in the article says, someone who likes living in Utah,"

“What I don’t like from people here, especially white people, is when they say they don’t understand why blacks don’t want to come here to play. They don’t have any right to speak on that,” Boone said.

So you are condemning people for dismissing someone's opinion while also praising the idea that a player believes an entire group of people have no right to an opinion based on the color of their skin...

2017 I guess

That's totally not what the player was saying. He was saying if you're not black how can you speak on the feelings of a black man not wanting to play in Utah? You don't know how it is to be black in Utah so maybe you should listen to what they're saying instead of dismissing them.
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Re: Interesting article on Black Players In Utah 

Post#216 » by TheNewEra » Mon Mar 20, 2017 1:43 am

KDBG wrote:
KDBG wrote:Being a minority born and raised in Utah, it is definitely a culture shock to most people, including black people for sure. Most of this is article is true, but one of the truest things of all is that people fall in love with the area once they actually experience it. Thurl Bailey is right too, it's not a racist place. I've only experienced true racism here a few times in my life (twice accused of stealing when I hadn't). I'm sure I would have experienced a lot more in other places around the country.

What people don't understand though is that Utah is way more diverse than it gets credit for. Being one of the reddest states in the country, Salt Lake City hasn't had a conservative mayor since the 60s I believe. The current mayor is a lesbian woman. Salt Lake City was actually named "gayest city" one year recently. Former gay NBA player John Amaechi said something along the lines of that Salt Lake City was the gayest city east of San Francisco.

Yup, not a lot of black people here, that's true. But there is a big Latino and Pacific Islander population. A lot of interracial families (including my own) are here, a good chunk of the time because Mormon missionaries go to different countries, or big cities and fall in love with the people there, and start dating women from that culture when they come back home.

One thing I can say is there are some really damn naive white people here. Almost in an adorable way. One time, at a salon I used to go to get my braids done, where Mormon white women were most of the clientele, this really funny thing happened. I noticed one day that all these chicks were huddled near me, whispering and giggling. I was like wtf? I went to the bathroom and came back, and my stylist says to me, "those girls were asking if that hot black guy played football for BYU". They were talking about me. Just because I had light brown skin and was getting my braids done, they assumed I was black and that the only way a black male was in Provo, Utah, was because he played sports. So yeah, if any of you are black and single and love white women, come to Provo and you will get the most beautiful white women in the world. No joke, you could be cock-eyed and overweight and smell like ass, it won't matter. They will treat you like a king.

Just bumping this. Cause you know, I'm a minority in Utah. I gotta protect my turf from falsehoods, and I have a unique perspective, k, bye. Yes, I'm being selfish. I just rep where I'm from, and I'll defend it till the day I die.


As a black man why would I want to be stereotyped by white women? lol we already know that the best received reactions of African Americans in this country is if you are perceived to be a athlete or entertainer. What happens to that person that isn't a athlete or isn't well known enough those looks can turn into the classic tuck your purse(which you admit does happen) in moments on top of that let's not forget how freely the code words like "THUG" get thrown around by people that want to say something else. Being light skinned is also a comfort that may also not trigger as many people as a dark skin individual will you no doubt will face issues though as stated.

People keep bringing up the gay mayor we all know damn well there are different tones from this country regarding race and sexual identity or preference. You didn't see a mass overflow of rainbow profiles when black lives matter happened to create awareness and accountability and you won't see blm on the other side. More people are likely to have a gay friend than a black friend.
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Re: Interesting article on Black Players In Utah 

Post#217 » by KDBG » Mon Mar 20, 2017 2:52 am

TheNewEra wrote:
KDBG wrote:
KDBG wrote:Being a minority born and raised in Utah, it is definitely a culture shock to most people, including black people for sure. Most of this is article is true, but one of the truest things of all is that people fall in love with the area once they actually experience it. Thurl Bailey is right too, it's not a racist place. I've only experienced true racism here a few times in my life (twice accused of stealing when I hadn't). I'm sure I would have experienced a lot more in other places around the country.

What people don't understand though is that Utah is way more diverse than it gets credit for. Being one of the reddest states in the country, Salt Lake City hasn't had a conservative mayor since the 60s I believe. The current mayor is a lesbian woman. Salt Lake City was actually named "gayest city" one year recently. Former gay NBA player John Amaechi said something along the lines of that Salt Lake City was the gayest city east of San Francisco.

Yup, not a lot of black people here, that's true. But there is a big Latino and Pacific Islander population. A lot of interracial families (including my own) are here, a good chunk of the time because Mormon missionaries go to different countries, or big cities and fall in love with the people there, and start dating women from that culture when they come back home.

One thing I can say is there are some really damn naive white people here. Almost in an adorable way. One time, at a salon I used to go to get my braids done, where Mormon white women were most of the clientele, this really funny thing happened. I noticed one day that all these chicks were huddled near me, whispering and giggling. I was like wtf? I went to the bathroom and came back, and my stylist says to me, "those girls were asking if that hot black guy played football for BYU". They were talking about me. Just because I had light brown skin and was getting my braids done, they assumed I was black and that the only way a black male was in Provo, Utah, was because he played sports. So yeah, if any of you are black and single and love white women, come to Provo and you will get the most beautiful white women in the world. No joke, you could be cock-eyed and overweight and smell like ass, it won't matter. They will treat you like a king.

Just bumping this. Cause you know, I'm a minority in Utah. I gotta protect my turf from falsehoods, and I have a unique perspective, k, bye. Yes, I'm being selfish. I just rep where I'm from, and I'll defend it till the day I die.


As a black man why would I want to be stereotyped by white women? lol we already know that the best received reactions of African Americans in this country is if you are perceived to be a athlete or entertainer. What happens to that person that isn't a athlete or isn't well known enough those looks can turn into the classic tuck your purse(which you admit does happen) in moments on top of that let's not forget how freely the code words like "THUG" get thrown around by people that want to say something else. Being light skinned is also a comfort that may also not trigger as many people as a dark skin individual will you no doubt will face issues though as stated.

People keep bringing up the gay mayor we all know damn well there are different tones from this country regarding race and sexual identity or preference. You didn't see a mass overflow of rainbow profiles when black lives matter happened to create awareness and accountability and you won't see blm on the other side. More people are likely to have a gay friend than a black friend.

I was trying to be funny man. I was making a point that everyone should feel welcome in Utah, and it's not a scary place.
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Re: Interesting article on Black Players In Utah 

Post#218 » by EAS Law » Mon Mar 20, 2017 1:07 pm

shoefly1 wrote:
EAS Law wrote:
shoefly1 wrote:I wish people would actually read this excellent article. It gives a nuanced and fair assessment of player's experiences in Utah and to simply describe is as either racist, or not racist is reductive and unfair. There are clearly cultural differences, for some people they are easier to deal with, for others less so. People should be allowed to express their experience without other people telling them it's invalid.

As one of the players in the article says, someone who likes living in Utah,"

“What I don’t like from people here, especially white people, is when they say they don’t understand why blacks don’t want to come here to play. They don’t have any right to speak on that,” Boone said.

So you are condemning people for dismissing someone's opinion while also praising the idea that a player believes an entire group of people have no right to an opinion based on the color of their skin...

2017 I guess


I recently listened to a radio show where a woman was talking about her discomfort and dislike of being catcalled on the street. She spoke to a man who had catcalled her for hours, trying to communicate her experience to the man. The man she talked to was a nice guy, sweet and charming, but no matter how much she tried, he kept telling her that her experience was wrong, that she should be flattered that he was catcalling her on the street. He told her that it was all in good fun, so she and the vast majority of women who feel the way she does just need to change their way of thinking.

I don't think it's, "2017" to allow people to share their own experience and preferences without telling them they are wrong.. I think it's decency.

Agreed on catcalling.

Can we not distinguish between someone being personally harassed/their right to privacy and security in their person and this new wave idea that entire groups of people are not allowed to even think about/opine/discuss issues based on the color of their skin or culture?
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Re: Interesting article on Black Players In Utah 

Post#219 » by EAS Law » Mon Mar 20, 2017 1:13 pm

E-Balla wrote:
EAS Law wrote:
shoefly1 wrote:I wish people would actually read this excellent article. It gives a nuanced and fair assessment of player's experiences in Utah and to simply describe is as either racist, or not racist is reductive and unfair. There are clearly cultural differences, for some people they are easier to deal with, for others less so. People should be allowed to express their experience without other people telling them it's invalid.

As one of the players in the article says, someone who likes living in Utah,"

“What I don’t like from people here, especially white people, is when they say they don’t understand why blacks don’t want to come here to play. They don’t have any right to speak on that,” Boone said.

So you are condemning people for dismissing someone's opinion while also praising the idea that a player believes an entire group of people have no right to an opinion based on the color of their skin...

2017 I guess

That's totally not what the player was saying. He was saying if you're not black how can you speak on the feelings of a black man not wanting to play in Utah? You don't know how it is to be black in Utah so maybe you should listen to what they're saying instead of dismissing them.

Incorrect.

Look at the quote.

"What I don't like, especially from white people, is when they say they don't understand why black players don't want to come here... they have NO RIGHT TO SPEAK ON THAT."

This is probably one of the most ignorant quotes I've ever seen in print and it's upsetting that so many people praise it.

This player is saying that people do not have the right to discuss an issue that maybe they don't understand.

It says nothing about how black players are wrong or in any way mistaken--it says "I don't understand why...". This is an invitation to explain all of these alleged reasons people segregate by choice whole also claiming to be in favor of inclusion, equality, and understanding.

In my opinion, this player is quite bigoted, and this position is extremely hostile and destructive.
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Re: Interesting article on Black Players In Utah 

Post#220 » by E-Balla » Mon Mar 20, 2017 2:32 pm

EAS Law wrote:
E-Balla wrote:
EAS Law wrote:So you are condemning people for dismissing someone's opinion while also praising the idea that a player believes an entire group of people have no right to an opinion based on the color of their skin...

2017 I guess

That's totally not what the player was saying. He was saying if you're not black how can you speak on the feelings of a black man not wanting to play in Utah? You don't know how it is to be black in Utah so maybe you should listen to what they're saying instead of dismissing them.

Incorrect.

Look at the quote.

"What I don't like, especially from white people, is when they say they don't understand why black players don't want to come here... they have NO RIGHT TO SPEAK ON THAT."

This is probably one of the most ignorant quotes I've ever seen in print and it's upsetting that so many people praise it.

This player is saying that people do not have the right to discuss an issue that maybe they don't understand.

It says nothing about how black players are wrong or in any way mistaken--it says "I don't understand why...". This is an invitation to explain all of these alleged reasons people segregate by choice whole also claiming to be in favor of inclusion, equality, and understanding.

In my opinion, this player is quite bigoted, and this position is extremely hostile and destructive.

He didn't say you can't ask him why not. He was saying you can't criticize those players and your last 2 paragraphs shows why he feels that way. See how you're trying to say "black players are wrong" which is really your main point? You're not wanting to hear why black players feel that way you're trying to tell them they're wrong.
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