In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF?

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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#41 » by TheWolfoftheNBA » Sun Jul 16, 2017 5:57 pm

Ballings7 wrote:
TheWolfoftheNBA wrote:
Ballings7 wrote:
Analytics stats all the new-age people adore mean nothing, and Ron Artest should of played SG primarily until he came to the Lakers, and LeBron, and Paul Pierce, and Scottie Pippen, and Shane Battier, and Luol Deng, and Tayshaun Prince, and Otto Porter, and Carmelo, and Nicolas Batum, and Quentin Richardon, and Peja Stojakovic., and Richard Jefferson, and Wilson Chandler, and Trevor Ariza, and James Posey, and Rudy Gay, and Kevin Durant... all really could of played and would play SG just as well as SF.

And vice versa for anyone who played SG primarily, they really could of played SF from night to night, just as well as they actually did at SG.

But I'm an idiot and so were all the coaches of those players judging their lineups to matching up with other teams.


Yeah you are. They're interchangeable. Deal with it.

Coaches put players in positions that are the norm or preferred by their stars. Thinking otherwise proves my point.

Everyone you've mentioned has played the 2 and 3, and in some cases the 4. Get it?


No, I'm not. And, I won't deal with it, because I know when someone is flat out wrong and ignorant.

Yeah, they have played both positions, not denying that; but they were not defined by playing the position they played less than the one they played the most.

No, I won't be getting something that conflicts heavily against reality and proven in history.

Have a good one being delusional to reality and history, squirt.


Get lost, bro.
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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#42 » by Ballings7 » Sun Jul 16, 2017 6:03 pm

TheWolfoftheNBA wrote:
Ballings7 wrote:
TheWolfoftheNBA wrote:
Yeah you are. They're interchangeable. Deal with it.

Coaches put players in positions that are the norm or preferred by their stars. Thinking otherwise proves my point.

Everyone you've mentioned has played the 2 and 3, and in some cases the 4. Get it?


No, I'm not. And, I won't deal with it, because I know when someone is flat out wrong and ignorant.

Yeah, they have played both positions, not denying that; but they were not defined by playing the position they played less than the one they played the most.

No, I won't be getting something that conflicts heavily against reality and proven in history.

Have a good one being delusional to reality and history, squirt.


Get lost, bro.


Nice try attempting to impose yourself with insistant responses - "Yeah you are.", "Deal with it", "Get it?"

Pathetic.

Ahhh, too bad, sorry, "bro"...
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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#43 » by Ballings7 » Mon Jul 17, 2017 12:44 am

Okay,

So here's the pro basketball positions for members of the new-age:



(1:38-2:34m for SGs begins)





Lovely. And she has such a beautiful voice, as well...











Further reference on pro basketball positions for new-age parties, direct yourselves, here:

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Shooting+guard

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Small+forward
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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#44 » by Danny11 » Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:22 am

The sg is 2nd smallest the sf is 3rd
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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#45 » by SinceGatlingWasARookie » Mon Jul 17, 2017 7:37 am

thinkingwarriors wrote:What are characteristics of a SG vs. a SF and how are the two positions different? Who would you say is the definition of one vs. the other?

One to three inches.
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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#46 » by HollowEarth » Mon Jul 17, 2017 8:24 am

LuDux1 wrote:I remember few years ago someone divided players statistically into i think 9 "positions". That someone should redo it
Is this the guy:
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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#47 » by Pennebaker » Mon Jul 17, 2017 8:26 am

Great question. But guess what? It was already a great question when it was asked back in 1985 with regards to Michael Jordan, who was known as a "big" 2 guard at 6'6. Jordan then racking up so many rebounds from the SG spot didn't really come as that much of a surprise because he was the size of a small forward.

What we're seeing happen right before our eyes is the extinction of the classic PG position.
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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#48 » by Ryoga Hibiki » Mon Jul 17, 2017 8:32 am

Teams used to have 1 handler, 2 wingers and 2 big men. Wingers and big men were usually playing very similar on offense. That's how you got into discussions like "is Duncan a center or a PF?", or you have Sprewell becoming suddenly a SF.
Now having 2 ball handlers, 2 wingers and 1 big man is getting more common.

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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#49 » by giberish » Mon Jul 17, 2017 10:02 am

Ryoga Hibiki wrote:Teams used to have 1 handler, 2 wingers and 2 big men. Wingers and big men were usually playing very similar on offense. That's how you got into discussions like "is Duncan a center or a PF?", or you have Sprewell becoming suddenly a SF.
Now having 2 ball handlers, 2 wingers and 1 big man is getting more common.

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Yeah, the league has gone back to looking more like Guard/Forward/Center then the Point/Wing/Post position descriptions from 10+ years ago.

The one catch is that while you want two ballhandler/playmakers on the court they aren't always the two guards. Often they're the PG and a forward. Then the SG description is more about size for defensive matchups. To some degree you can work around having a SG at all if you've got enough quality forwards including at least one who can be a secondary ballhandler. Of course getting that many quality forwards is really tough so you almost always have a smaller wing at SG.
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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF 

Post#50 » by The_Hater » Mon Jul 17, 2017 11:43 am

Historically there have been a lot of similarities between SF and SG, but I actually think those similarities are becoming less so today. Teams are using SG's to defend opposing PG's more than ever and we're seeing mor undersized SG's as a result while SF's are being asked to play PF more than ever. If anything, the difference in size and skill set between a SF and a SG is probably getting larger while the difference in size and skill set between a Sf and a PF is getting smaller
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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#51 » by nk657 » Mon Jul 17, 2017 1:40 pm

I Would rephrase the question to this " Why most of GMS think that SFs can play as guards?"

Answer: BECAUSE THEY THINK THAT THEY CAN BRING AN ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM.

The hype that runs todays NBa and GMS mentality is that all starters need to be at least 6,7. This will explain a lot why Jimmy Butler for instance went to MN, or why Wiggins plays as a guard now. Why they force Khris MIddletoon and JR smith to play as 2. Even Sixers see B .Simmons future as a guard. There is an excuse of course for all this. Todays Guards cant shoot ****. So now the fashion is" I preffer to have a second SF who can be a better scorer and a better player and make him play as a guard rather than have a worse innefective pure SG/PG guard. But basketball doesnt change really. Teams still play with 40s and 50s systems(triangle offence).
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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#52 » by Joseph17 » Mon Jul 17, 2017 1:59 pm

We are basically in the age of positionless basketball so the answer would be none. When I first started watching basketball about 20 years ago there was a significant difference between the two positions. A prototypical SG would be someone like Reggie Miller and Ray Allen. Not great ball handling or playmaking ability, but great at coming off screens and shooting the ball. A prototypical small forward would be someone like Shawn Marion. Great all around player, but not a great playmaker or a great shooter. Can hit the 3 from time to time though. Just compare a prototypical SF like Marion to a prototypical SG like Allen and you'll see that that there used to be major differences between the two positions.
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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#53 » by whitehops » Mon Jul 17, 2017 2:10 pm

nba teams operate under the 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 terminology and those numbers have duties/roles in plays based on the ability of the player, not the size. 1 typically starts with the ball so you want to put a good ball handler in that position. if 2 doesn't have the ball there are a lot of sets that require them to run around screens off the ball (depending on the offense). 3 generally does a mix of everything. 4 historically was considered a big but now is really a perimeter player, like a watered-down 3. 5 is still considered the big, sets most of the ball screens, etc.

the reason basketball is becoming more position-less is not just some random thing that was made up, it's because you have these tall players that have developed the abilities to play the 3, 2, and sometimes 1.

essentially what i'm trying to say is that the 2 and 3 roles in basketball are still different, players have just become so skilled and versatile that they can play more roles now than before.
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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#54 » by giordunk » Mon Jul 17, 2017 2:34 pm

No one is talking about the most practical application of positions... It's just for the sake of simplicity the 2 and 3 will do certain things on a certain play. 3 sets a screen for the 2 on this play. If the coach has to make a substitution the play is still portable to a different lineup because players know that they're a 2 or 3 on the play.
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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#55 » by GWVan » Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:15 pm

Here is a great write up on analytical determination of player types - it comes up with 11
https://medium.com/hanman/the-evolution-of-nba-player-positions-using-unsupervised-clustering-to-uncover-functional-roles-a1d07089935c
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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#56 » by madmaxmedia » Mon Jul 17, 2017 5:00 pm

Well, in today's NBA what is the difference between a PG and a C?

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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#57 » by Forbes » Mon Jul 17, 2017 5:10 pm

In today NBA in many cases there might not be a difference between SG and SF. A lot of players are able to play multiple positions. On both sides of the court.

I used to look at Jordan as the type of SG you want on your team. They score when they want and have enough handle where they can run the point for a bit.

Now you got 6'11 humans doing what I just described.
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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#58 » by dautjazz » Mon Jul 17, 2017 5:47 pm

Danny11 wrote:The sg is 2nd smallest the sf is 3rd


Usually, but more important, usually the shorter of the two wings would be the SG.

I think PG would usually go to your best playmaker (Lebron and Bird are those rare exceptions), then there are the wings, then your bigs. I would say usually a SF is not a SG because he can hit the boards a little more than the SG. Shooting guard I think is traditionally your off the ball short player, and at the same time he'd be expected to be trying to get open for shots all the time (like R.Miller, R.Hamilton, K.Korver, etc..). SF would ideally be 6'8" or and taller, but probably too lean to play PF. Center ideally would be your best rim protector, which usually ends up being your taller big, and your 2nd biggest body (starting material obviously) would your PF.
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im 20, and i did grow up watching MJ play in the 90's.
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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#59 » by infintybeyond » Mon Jul 17, 2017 5:47 pm

When i grew up watching,
PG 6'0" - 6'4"
SG 6'5" - 6'7"
SF 6'7" - 6'9"
PF 6'9" - 6'12"
C 6'11" - 6'18"

Today's NBA is almost position less with everyone sharing the same skill sets (shooting, dribbling, rebounding, little shot blocking, no post game). Small ball lineups get rid of big centers and essentially run 5 players that can dribble and shoot the 3 ball.

Back to the original question, I don't see a difference anymore.
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Re: In today's NBA what is the difference between a SG and a SF? 

Post#60 » by nk657 » Mon Jul 17, 2017 9:59 pm

Its funny that the team who dominates the leauge the last 3 years plays the "least positionless" basketball of all" isnt it?

Aka Golden State Warriors. Modernism doesnt mean success necessarily. Ask jose mourinho..

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