ImageImage

2020 Badgers Football

Moderators: paulpressey25, MickeyDavis, humanrefutation

neiLz
Veteran
Posts: 2,772
And1: 790
Joined: Oct 04, 2011
Location: Riverwest
     

Re: 2020 Badgers Football - Cruickshank is Transferring 

Post#121 » by neiLz » Wed Jun 24, 2020 1:08 am

MikeIsGood wrote:
neiLz wrote:
Read on Twitter
?s=19


Just heard and came to post if no one else had yet.

This class is awesome so far.

Heard there still in on a few more 4 stars. Could push them into top ten and would be Badgers best class ever.
Formerly known as ArodpwnsFavre
Kfarm2711
Junior
Posts: 485
And1: 158
Joined: Nov 09, 2017
 

Re: 2020 Badgers Football - Cruickshank is Transferring 

Post#122 » by Kfarm2711 » Wed Jul 15, 2020 5:49 am

Braelen Allen committed.
User avatar
ReasonablySober
Retired Mod
Retired Mod
Posts: 77,862
And1: 17,922
Joined: Dec 02, 2001
Location: Cheap dinner. Watch basketball. Bone down.
Contact:
         

Re: 2020 Badgers Football - Cruickshank is Transferring 

Post#123 » by ReasonablySober » Wed Jul 15, 2020 4:18 pm

Kfarm2711 wrote:Braelen Allen committed.


LMAO. This morning he was the 116th ranked player on 247. This afternoon after the commit he's the 202nd.
Magic Giannison wrote:TRADE GIANNIS

User avatar
Sky Bucks
Sixth Man
Posts: 1,604
And1: 1,230
Joined: Jan 05, 2014
Location: Whitewater
     

Re: 2020 Badgers Football - Cruickshank is Transferring 

Post#124 » by Sky Bucks » Wed Jul 15, 2020 5:33 pm

ReasonablySober wrote:
Kfarm2711 wrote:Braelen Allen committed.


LMAO. This morning he was the 116th ranked player on 247. This afternoon after the commit he's the 202nd.

Yup sounds about right haha, but they put him as an ILB instead of S, so maybe that had partial reason :dontknow:
#Make'em Believe On Wisconsin
User avatar
Kerb Hohl
RealGM
Posts: 29,770
And1: 2,308
Joined: Jun 17, 2005
Location: Hmmmm...how many 1sts would Jason Richardson cost...?

Re: 2020 Badgers Football - Cruickshank is Transferring 

Post#125 » by Kerb Hohl » Tue Jul 21, 2020 9:07 pm

Read on Twitter


Hmmmmmm
User avatar
ReasonablySober
Retired Mod
Retired Mod
Posts: 77,862
And1: 17,922
Joined: Dec 02, 2001
Location: Cheap dinner. Watch basketball. Bone down.
Contact:
         

Re: 2020 Badgers Football - Cruickshank is Transferring 

Post#126 » by ReasonablySober » Mon Aug 31, 2020 4:46 pm

Read on Twitter


Interesting.
Magic Giannison wrote:TRADE GIANNIS

User avatar
humanrefutation
Forum Mod
Forum Mod
Posts: 27,192
And1: 9,864
Joined: Jun 05, 2006
       

Re: 2020 Badgers Football - Third of B1G Players Who Got COVID Now Have Heart Condition 

Post#127 » by humanrefutation » Thu Sep 3, 2020 5:04 pm

Yikes.

Read on Twitter
User avatar
ReasonablySober
Retired Mod
Retired Mod
Posts: 77,862
And1: 17,922
Joined: Dec 02, 2001
Location: Cheap dinner. Watch basketball. Bone down.
Contact:
         

Re: 2020 Badgers Football - Third of B1G Players Who Got COVID Now Have Heart Condition 

Post#129 » by ReasonablySober » Tue Sep 8, 2020 10:12 pm

Wow, Nolan Rucci commits to Wisconsin.
Magic Giannison wrote:TRADE GIANNIS

User avatar
MikeIsGood
RealGM
Posts: 27,319
And1: 4,050
Joined: Jul 10, 2003
Location: Vamos Rafa
     

Re: 2020 Badgers Football - Third of B1G Players Who Got COVID Now Have Heart Condition 

Post#130 » by MikeIsGood » Tue Sep 8, 2020 11:40 pm

ReasonablySober wrote:Wow, Nolan Rucci commits to Wisconsin.


2021 class is wild (for us :) ).
User avatar
ReasonablySober
Retired Mod
Retired Mod
Posts: 77,862
And1: 17,922
Joined: Dec 02, 2001
Location: Cheap dinner. Watch basketball. Bone down.
Contact:
         

Re: 2020 Badgers Football 

Post#131 » by ReasonablySober » Tue Sep 15, 2020 3:57 pm

Word is announcement of Big Ten football being back comes tonight.
Magic Giannison wrote:TRADE GIANNIS

User avatar
Kerb Hohl
RealGM
Posts: 29,770
And1: 2,308
Joined: Jun 17, 2005
Location: Hmmmm...how many 1sts would Jason Richardson cost...?

Re: 2020 Badgers Football 

Post#132 » by Kerb Hohl » Tue Sep 15, 2020 6:23 pm

I am laughing my ass off at the Big 10/PAC 12 right now. It was pretty clear the PSU doc thing would be corrected hours later.

We have hundreds and hundreds of athletes that have tested positive for COVID, all being strictly monitored by doctors. There are a few college linemen that had some heart concerns, most have already been cleared to return...and we have Eduardo Rodriguez.

So myocarditis pretty clearly is about a ~1% result, if that. Other viruses also carry myocarditis.

The NFL had 171 cases with no myocarditis.

How was it possible that 35% of PSU guys did? I realize that story is old but it was comical from the start.

You don't need to run a big study. We're watching one in real time.

This isn't to say that there is zero risk of heart issues. I do take that seriously, don't get me wrong. But at this point, we're far enough into this to have some real-time data where even if we have to say, "well, it's novel and we don't know yet," common sense can guide you. We can't wait for months or years for answers like this.

Also, not playing football games, while I realize there is a contact tracing issue with games, does not leave players immune from COVID. The schools themselves told them to come back to campus and they've been practicing for weeks, so I don't really understand how much worse playing games makes things.
User avatar
ReasonablySober
Retired Mod
Retired Mod
Posts: 77,862
And1: 17,922
Joined: Dec 02, 2001
Location: Cheap dinner. Watch basketball. Bone down.
Contact:
         

Re: 2020 Badgers Football 

Post#133 » by ReasonablySober » Tue Sep 15, 2020 6:38 pm

Kerb Hohl wrote:I am laughing my ass off at the Big 10/PAC 12 right now. It was pretty clear the PSU doc thing would be corrected hours later.

We have hundreds and hundreds of athletes that have tested positive for COVID, all being strictly monitored by doctors.


Ehhh does anyone really believe that?

Read on Twitter


Kerb Hohl wrote:This isn't to say that there is zero risk of heart issues. I do take that seriously, don't get me wrong. But at this point, we're far enough into this to have some real-time data where even if we have to say, "well, it's novel and we don't know yet," common sense can guide you. We can't wait for months or years for answers like this.


Of course you can. In a normal, functioning society you wouldn't be playing football or sending kids to campuses until there's a working vaccine and more was known about the long term effects of the disease.

But whatever, people need their sports (and dollars) apparently.
Magic Giannison wrote:TRADE GIANNIS

User avatar
Kerb Hohl
RealGM
Posts: 29,770
And1: 2,308
Joined: Jun 17, 2005
Location: Hmmmm...how many 1sts would Jason Richardson cost...?

Re: 2020 Badgers Football 

Post#134 » by Kerb Hohl » Tue Sep 15, 2020 6:55 pm

ReasonablySober wrote:
Kerb Hohl wrote:I am laughing my ass off at the Big 10/PAC 12 right now. It was pretty clear the PSU doc thing would be corrected hours later.

We have hundreds and hundreds of athletes that have tested positive for COVID, all being strictly monitored by doctors.


Ehhh does anyone really believe that?

Read on Twitter


Kerb Hohl wrote:This isn't to say that there is zero risk of heart issues. I do take that seriously, don't get me wrong. But at this point, we're far enough into this to have some real-time data where even if we have to say, "well, it's novel and we don't know yet," common sense can guide you. We can't wait for months or years for answers like this.


Of course you can. In a normal, functioning society you wouldn't be playing football or sending kids to campuses until there's a working vaccine and more was known about the long term effects of the disease.

But whatever, people need their sports (and dollars) apparently.


JerkoffMotion.gif on positive cases among college students/players themselves.

If there were serious long-term effects, we'd be seeing it already. Those players are monitored by doctors to return to play. There have been some faint, "this is a bit concerning" about hearts of players, but so far it appears that across all pro and college leagues and students themselves, there are no significant long-term issues.

If you have 10,000 positive cases and long-term issues are much more of a thing than most other viruses (especially for that age group), you'd be seeing tens or hundreds of them already back with the doctor expressing problems.

At no point in human history have we shut down everything to wait for a vaccine.

I understand the risk for the community and other ages, but to the age group of college football players there is essentially zero risk. Some of the best doctors in the world are clearing these guys to return and there don't seem to be many lingering issues.

I am fine leaving large gatherings shut down and some aspects of life, but it's a bit cavalier to say, "whatever, it's just like a year of your life and everything you've worked for/your livelihood. We may or may not have a vaccine in like 7 months (where the problem does not fully go away) though! So...maybe...you can do the stuff you love and/or earn money to do in like a year or two. Hold on there. No big deal!" "It's just college football, who cares."

Seriously. If you're getting worked up about positive cases among college-aged people and their specific health...change your perspective or you're never going to get your brain out of this.
User avatar
ReasonablySober
Retired Mod
Retired Mod
Posts: 77,862
And1: 17,922
Joined: Dec 02, 2001
Location: Cheap dinner. Watch basketball. Bone down.
Contact:
         

Re: 2020 Badgers Football 

Post#135 » by ReasonablySober » Tue Sep 15, 2020 7:09 pm

Kerb Hohl wrote:
ReasonablySober wrote:
Kerb Hohl wrote:I am laughing my ass off at the Big 10/PAC 12 right now. It was pretty clear the PSU doc thing would be corrected hours later.

We have hundreds and hundreds of athletes that have tested positive for COVID, all being strictly monitored by doctors.


Ehhh does anyone really believe that?

Read on Twitter


Kerb Hohl wrote:This isn't to say that there is zero risk of heart issues. I do take that seriously, don't get me wrong. But at this point, we're far enough into this to have some real-time data where even if we have to say, "well, it's novel and we don't know yet," common sense can guide you. We can't wait for months or years for answers like this.


Of course you can. In a normal, functioning society you wouldn't be playing football or sending kids to campuses until there's a working vaccine and more was known about the long term effects of the disease.

But whatever, people need their sports (and dollars) apparently.


JerkoffMotion.gif on positive cases among college students/players themselves.

If there were serious long-term effects, we'd be seeing it already. Those players are monitored by doctors to return to play. There have been some faint, "this is a bit concerning" about hearts of players, but so far it appears that across all pro and college leagues and students themselves, there are no significant long-term issues.

If you have 10,000 positive cases and long-term issues are much more of a thing than most other viruses (especially for that age group), you'd be seeing tens or hundreds of them already back with the doctor expressing problems.

At no point in human history have we shut down everything to wait for a vaccine.

I understand the risk for the community and other ages, but to the age group of college football players there is essentially zero risk. Some of the best doctors in the world are clearing these guys to return and there don't seem to be many lingering issues.

I am fine leaving large gatherings shut down and some aspects of life, but it's a bit cavalier to say, "whatever, it's just like a year of your life and everything you've worked for/your livelihood. We may or may not have a vaccine in like 7 months (where the problem does not fully go away) though! So...maybe...you can do the stuff you love and/or earn money to do in like a year or two. Hold on there. No big deal!" "It's just college football, who cares."

Seriously. If you're getting worked up about positive cases among college-aged people and their specific health...change your perspective or you're never going to get your brain out of this.


I know you understand that the issue with a college kid getting sick doesn't end with just that student. It's teachers, family, coaches, janitors, cafeteria workers, the employees of the stores the students visit, people delivering food, and bartenders.

As for long term effects, here's the dang Mayo Clinic:

• Heart. Imaging tests taken months after recovery from COVID-19 have shown lasting damage to the heart muscle, even in people who experienced only mild COVID-19 symptoms. This may increase the risk of heart failure or other heart complications in the future.

• Lungs. The type of pneumonia often associated with COVID-19 can cause long-standing damage to the tiny air sac• s (alveoli) in the lungs. The resulting scar tissue can lead to long-term breathing problems.

•Brain. Even in young people, COVID-19 can cause strokes, seizures and Guillain-Barre syndrome — a condition that causes temporary paralysis. COVID-19 may also increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

Many long-term COVID-19 effects still unknown
Much is still unknown about how COVID-19 will affect people over time. However, researchers recommend that doctors closely monitor people who have had COVID-19 to see how their organs are functioning after recovery.

It's important to remember that most people who have COVID-19 recover quickly. But the potentially long-lasting problems from COVID-19 make it even more important to reduce the spread of the disease by following precautions such as wearing masks, avoiding crowds and keeping hands clean.
Magic Giannison wrote:TRADE GIANNIS

User avatar
Kerb Hohl
RealGM
Posts: 29,770
And1: 2,308
Joined: Jun 17, 2005
Location: Hmmmm...how many 1sts would Jason Richardson cost...?

Re: 2020 Badgers Football 

Post#136 » by Kerb Hohl » Tue Sep 15, 2020 7:13 pm

ReasonablySober wrote:
Kerb Hohl wrote:
ReasonablySober wrote:
Ehhh does anyone really believe that?

Read on Twitter




Of course you can. In a normal, functioning society you wouldn't be playing football or sending kids to campuses until there's a working vaccine and more was known about the long term effects of the disease.

But whatever, people need their sports (and dollars) apparently.


JerkoffMotion.gif on positive cases among college students/players themselves.

If there were serious long-term effects, we'd be seeing it already. Those players are monitored by doctors to return to play. There have been some faint, "this is a bit concerning" about hearts of players, but so far it appears that across all pro and college leagues and students themselves, there are no significant long-term issues.

If you have 10,000 positive cases and long-term issues are much more of a thing than most other viruses (especially for that age group), you'd be seeing tens or hundreds of them already back with the doctor expressing problems.

At no point in human history have we shut down everything to wait for a vaccine.

I understand the risk for the community and other ages, but to the age group of college football players there is essentially zero risk. Some of the best doctors in the world are clearing these guys to return and there don't seem to be many lingering issues.

I am fine leaving large gatherings shut down and some aspects of life, but it's a bit cavalier to say, "whatever, it's just like a year of your life and everything you've worked for/your livelihood. We may or may not have a vaccine in like 7 months (where the problem does not fully go away) though! So...maybe...you can do the stuff you love and/or earn money to do in like a year or two. Hold on there. No big deal!" "It's just college football, who cares."

Seriously. If you're getting worked up about positive cases among college-aged people and their specific health...change your perspective or you're never going to get your brain out of this.


I know you understand that the issue with a college kid getting sick doesn't end with just that student. It's teachers, family, coaches, janitors, cafeteria workers, the employees of the stores the students visit, people delivering food, and bartenders.

As for long term effects, here's the dang Mayo Clinic:

• Heart. Imaging tests taken months after recovery from COVID-19 have shown lasting damage to the heart muscle, even in people who experienced only mild COVID-19 symptoms. This may increase the risk of heart failure or other heart complications in the future.

• Lungs. The type of pneumonia often associated with COVID-19 can cause long-standing damage to the tiny air sac• s (alveoli) in the lungs. The resulting scar tissue can lead to long-term breathing problems.

•Brain. Even in young people, COVID-19 can cause strokes, seizures and Guillain-Barre syndrome — a condition that causes temporary paralysis. COVID-19 may also increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

Many long-term COVID-19 effects still unknown
Much is still unknown about how COVID-19 will affect people over time. However, researchers recommend that doctors closely monitor people who have had COVID-19 to see how their organs are functioning after recovery.

It's important to remember that most people who have COVID-19 recover quickly. But the potentially long-lasting problems from COVID-19 make it even more important to reduce the spread of the disease by following precautions such as wearing masks, avoiding crowds and keeping hands clean.


Yes, I understand that there is risk to others in the community...but to fully protect those communities it may be a matter of years. Risk/reward = sorry, younger people will have to live some aspect of normal life. Not all, but at least something.

There are studies/articles that lungs/heart are showing improvement in severely affected patients as we begin to gather more data.

You're aware that basically all other viruses carry these risks to some degree as well, right? This isn't a new thing.
User avatar
ReasonablySober
Retired Mod
Retired Mod
Posts: 77,862
And1: 17,922
Joined: Dec 02, 2001
Location: Cheap dinner. Watch basketball. Bone down.
Contact:
         

Re: 2020 Badgers Football 

Post#137 » by ReasonablySober » Tue Sep 15, 2020 7:15 pm

Kerb Hohl wrote:
ReasonablySober wrote:
Kerb Hohl wrote:
JerkoffMotion.gif on positive cases among college students/players themselves.

If there were serious long-term effects, we'd be seeing it already. Those players are monitored by doctors to return to play. There have been some faint, "this is a bit concerning" about hearts of players, but so far it appears that across all pro and college leagues and students themselves, there are no significant long-term issues.

If you have 10,000 positive cases and long-term issues are much more of a thing than most other viruses (especially for that age group), you'd be seeing tens or hundreds of them already back with the doctor expressing problems.

At no point in human history have we shut down everything to wait for a vaccine.

I understand the risk for the community and other ages, but to the age group of college football players there is essentially zero risk. Some of the best doctors in the world are clearing these guys to return and there don't seem to be many lingering issues.

I am fine leaving large gatherings shut down and some aspects of life, but it's a bit cavalier to say, "whatever, it's just like a year of your life and everything you've worked for/your livelihood. We may or may not have a vaccine in like 7 months (where the problem does not fully go away) though! So...maybe...you can do the stuff you love and/or earn money to do in like a year or two. Hold on there. No big deal!" "It's just college football, who cares."

Seriously. If you're getting worked up about positive cases among college-aged people and their specific health...change your perspective or you're never going to get your brain out of this.


I know you understand that the issue with a college kid getting sick doesn't end with just that student. It's teachers, family, coaches, janitors, cafeteria workers, the employees of the stores the students visit, people delivering food, and bartenders.

As for long term effects, here's the dang Mayo Clinic:

• Heart. Imaging tests taken months after recovery from COVID-19 have shown lasting damage to the heart muscle, even in people who experienced only mild COVID-19 symptoms. This may increase the risk of heart failure or other heart complications in the future.

• Lungs. The type of pneumonia often associated with COVID-19 can cause long-standing damage to the tiny air sac• s (alveoli) in the lungs. The resulting scar tissue can lead to long-term breathing problems.

•Brain. Even in young people, COVID-19 can cause strokes, seizures and Guillain-Barre syndrome — a condition that causes temporary paralysis. COVID-19 may also increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

Many long-term COVID-19 effects still unknown
Much is still unknown about how COVID-19 will affect people over time. However, researchers recommend that doctors closely monitor people who have had COVID-19 to see how their organs are functioning after recovery.

It's important to remember that most people who have COVID-19 recover quickly. But the potentially long-lasting problems from COVID-19 make it even more important to reduce the spread of the disease by following precautions such as wearing masks, avoiding crowds and keeping hands clean.


Yes, I understand that there is risk to others in the community...but to fully protect those communities it may be a matter of years. Risk/reward = sorry, younger people will have to live some aspect of normal life. Not all, but at least something.

There are studies/articles that lungs/heart are showing improvement in severely affected patients as we begin to gather more data.

You're aware that basically all other viruses carry these risks to some degree as well, right? This isn't a new thing.


Sure, but that doesn't mean I think it's a good idea to expose people to those viruses in the name of a game.
Magic Giannison wrote:TRADE GIANNIS

User avatar
Kerb Hohl
RealGM
Posts: 29,770
And1: 2,308
Joined: Jun 17, 2005
Location: Hmmmm...how many 1sts would Jason Richardson cost...?

Re: 2020 Badgers Football 

Post#138 » by Kerb Hohl » Tue Sep 15, 2020 7:18 pm

ReasonablySober wrote:
Kerb Hohl wrote:
ReasonablySober wrote:
I know you understand that the issue with a college kid getting sick doesn't end with just that student. It's teachers, family, coaches, janitors, cafeteria workers, the employees of the stores the students visit, people delivering food, and bartenders.

As for long term effects, here's the dang Mayo Clinic:



Yes, I understand that there is risk to others in the community...but to fully protect those communities it may be a matter of years. Risk/reward = sorry, younger people will have to live some aspect of normal life. Not all, but at least something.

There are studies/articles that lungs/heart are showing improvement in severely affected patients as we begin to gather more data.

You're aware that basically all other viruses carry these risks to some degree as well, right? This isn't a new thing.


Sure, but that doesn't mean I think it's a good idea to expose people to those viruses in the name of a game.


Have you ever attended a sporting event in your life? Concert? Classroom? Airplane? Played sports?

Congratulations. You probably played a part in transmitting a virus with long-term effects to somebody.

If we can be guaranteed of an effective, fully adopted, ready vaccine in like 6 months...then I'll admit that we were all too impatient even though a vaccine does not make this go away by any extent for years. Life has to continue in some capacity unless hospitals are overwhelmed or people are dying at a much higher clip.

Specifically on college sports, they provide jobs, scholarships, physical activity, a path to go pro, improvement to mental health, and scholarships if the athletic departments don't go bankrupt. There are also down-the-line economic impacts to shutting down everything non-essential that begin to cause essential problems in the economy. We can argue on a different day on college football/basketball player compensation, but this is just another thing in the list of, "whatever, it's not essential. We can't do it, there's a pandemic" that all begin to add up.
chonestown
Lead Assistant
Posts: 4,948
And1: 5,735
Joined: Mar 13, 2010
Location: Pants is a highly charged topic

Re: 2020 Badgers Football 

Post#139 » by chonestown » Wed Sep 16, 2020 5:15 am

When it comes to medical matters, I defer to the Mayo Clinic.

When it comes to fried chicken franchises, I defer to Popeye's. Love my chicken from Popeye's.
“I went to Toronto, I went to Atlanta/I used to drink Pepsi, but now I like Fanta.”

-Hannibal Burress's impression of Canadian music figure Drake
User avatar
BUCKnation
RealGM
Posts: 14,567
And1: 1,382
Joined: Jun 15, 2011
       

Re: 2020 Badgers Football 

Post#140 » by BUCKnation » Wed Sep 16, 2020 8:23 am

I just didn't see the harm in them attempting to play if possible. As long as they were testing, it's not likely they'd be anymore vulnerable b/c they aren't playing on saturdays.

Return to Green Bay Packers