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George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2

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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#141 » by stuporman » Sat Sep 5, 2020 8:26 am

HarthorneWingo wrote:
stuporman wrote:
HarthorneWingo wrote:Lying ass mofo cops. The NYPD denied that the car belonged to it. Turns out, it does.

#DefundThePolice


I like David Doel but he may be wrong here.

Those are counter protesters, blue lives matter Trump supporters that cops escorted them to their car who appear to have bought a surplus police vehicle and have as a personal car but it isn't currently in service for the police.

Not completely confirmed yet but this is the story going around about the scenario for the incident.


I'm open to learning more facts. Do you have any links/sources?


I don't have specific links at the moment, the details are not quite in the MSM yet but this is what's being suggested from people who have more information that I don't have at my fingertips. I'm sure the exact nature of it will come out in the coming days but it seems reasonable enough.
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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#142 » by HarthorneWingo » Sat Sep 5, 2020 11:51 pm

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/white-supremacists-biggest-terror-threat-dhs_n_5f530fb0c5b6578026ce43b5

“White supremacist extremists will remain the most persistent and lethal threat" through 2021, according to Homeland Security draft reports obtained by Politico.
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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#143 » by HarthorneWingo » Sun Sep 6, 2020 7:18 am



_____________________________________

I highly recommend watching this video on the interpretations of body cam footage

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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#144 » by HarthorneWingo » Mon Sep 7, 2020 3:06 am

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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#145 » by Fat Kat » Tue Sep 8, 2020 9:27 am

HarthorneWingo wrote:

_____________________________________

I highly recommend watching this video on the interpretations of body cam footage



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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#146 » by HarthorneWingo » Tue Sep 8, 2020 7:53 pm

Utah police shot up an unarmed 13 year old autistic boy (In the back while he ran from police) whose mother had called police for assistance bc the child was having a mental health episode.

Police accused the boy of threatening them with “a weapon.” No weapon as of yet has been identified.

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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#147 » by Are We Ther Yet » Tue Sep 8, 2020 8:09 pm

HarthorneWingo wrote:https://www.huffpost.com/entry/white-supremacists-biggest-terror-threat-dhs_n_5f530fb0c5b6578026ce43b5

“White supremacist extremists will remain the most persistent and lethal threat" through 2021, according to Homeland Security draft reports obtained by Politico.


Really would love to see the stats to back up the claims. The only threat I see right now is the BLM/ANTIFA attacks on cities across the nation.
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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#148 » by Pointgod » Tue Sep 8, 2020 8:10 pm

HarthorneWingo wrote:Utah police shot up an unarmed 13 year old autistic boy (In the back while he ran from police) whose mother had called police for assistance bc the child was having a mental health episode.

Police accused the boy of threatening them with “a weapon.” No weapon as of yet has been identified.



https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/sep/08/linden-cameron-police-shooting-boy-autism-utah

“I said, ‘He’s unarmed, he doesn’t have anything, he just gets mad and he starts yelling and screaming,’” she said. “He’s a kid, he’s trying to get attention, he doesn’t know how to regulate.”

She added: “They’re supposed to come out and be able to de-escalate a situation using the most minimal force possible.”

Instead, she said, two officers went through the front door of the home and in less than five minutes were yelling “get down on the ground” before firing several shots.

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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#149 » by HarthorneWingo » Tue Sep 8, 2020 8:47 pm

Are We Ther Yet wrote:
HarthorneWingo wrote:https://www.huffpost.com/entry/white-supremacists-biggest-terror-threat-dhs_n_5f530fb0c5b6578026ce43b5

“White supremacist extremists will remain the most persistent and lethal threat" through 2021, according to Homeland Security draft reports obtained by Politico.


Really would love to see the stats to back up the claims. The only threat I see right now is the BLM/ANTIFA attacks on cities across the nation.



https://www.csis.org/analysis/escalating-terrorism-problem-united-states

The Escalating Terrorism Problem in the United States
CSIS Briefs
June 17, 2020

THE ISSUE

The United States faces a growing terrorism problem that will likely worsen over the next year. Based on a CSIS data set of terrorist incidents, the most significant threat likely comes from white supremacists, though anarchists and religious extremists inspired by the Islamic State and al-Qaeda could present a potential threat as well. Over the rest of 2020, the terrorist threat in the United States will likely rise based on several factors, including the November 2020 presidential election.

On June 3, 2020, federal authorities arrested three individuals allegedly associated with the “boogaloo” movement, a loosely-organized group of extremists preparing for a civil war, for conspiring to cause violence in Las Vegas and possessing an improvised incendiary device.1 Less than a week later, law enforcement officials near Richmond, VA, arrested Harry H. Rogers, a member of the Ku Klux Klan, for driving a vehicle into peaceful protesters. Around the same time, members of a Brooklyn anarchist group urged its supporters to conduct “rebellion” against the government.2 Extremists from all sides flooded social media with disinformation, conspiracy theories, and incitements to violence in response to the protests following the death of George Floyd, swamping Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, and other platforms.3

This CSIS brief examines the state of terrorism in the United States. It asks two sets of questions. First, what are the most significant types of terrorism in the United States, and how has the terrorism threat in the U.S. homeland evolved over time? Second, what are the implications for terrorism over the next year? To answer these questions, this analysis compiles and analyzes an original data set of 893 terrorist plots and attacks in the United States between January 1994 and May 2020.

This analysis makes several arguments. First, far-right terrorism has significantly outpaced terrorism from other types of perpetrators, including from far-left networks and individuals inspired by the Islamic State and al-Qaeda. Right-wing attacks and plots account for the majority of all terrorist incidents in the United States since 1994, and the total number of right-wing attacks and plots has grown significantly during the past six years. Right-wing extremists perpetrated two thirds of the attacks and plots in the United States in 2019 and over 90 percent between January 1 and May 8, 2020. Second, terrorism in the United States will likely increase over the next year in response to several factors. One of the most concerning is the 2020 U.S. presidential election, before and after which extremists may resort to violence, depending on the outcome of the election. Far-right and far-left networks have used violence against each other at protests, raising the possibility of escalating violence during the election period.

The rest of this brief is divided into the following sections. The first defines terrorism and its main types. The second section analyzes terrorism trends in the United States since 1994. The third examines far-right, far-left, and religious networks. The fourth section highlights the terrorism threat over the next year.
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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#150 » by HarthorneWingo » Tue Sep 8, 2020 8:50 pm

Are We There Yet wrote:
HarthorneWingo wrote:https://www.huffpost.com/entry/white-supremacists-biggest-terror-threat-dhs_n_5f530fb0c5b6578026ce43b5

Must I do everything?

“White supremacist extremists will remain the most persistent and lethal threat" through 2021, according to Homeland Security draft reports obtained by Politico.


Really would love to see the stats to back up the claims. The only threat I see right now is the BLM/ANTIFA attacks on cities across the nation.


https://www.politico.com/news/2020/09/04/white-supremacists-terror-threat-dhs-409236

DHS draft document: White supremacists are greatest terror threat
The documents are slightly different drafts of the same annual threat assessment, which is not yet published.

By BETSY WOODRUFF SWAN
09/04/2020 05:45 PM EDT

White supremacists present the gravest terror threat to the United States, according to a draft report from the Department of Homeland Security.

Two later draft versions of the same document — all of which were reviewed by POLITICO — describe the threat from white supremacists in slightly different language. But all three drafts describe the threat from white supremacists as the deadliest domestic terror threat facing the U.S., listed above the immediate danger from foreign terrorist groups.

“Foreign terrorist organizations will continue to call for Homeland attacks but probably will remain constrained in their ability to direct such plots over the next year,” all three documents say.

Russia “probably will be the primary covert foreign influence actor and purveyor of disinformation and misinformation in the Homeland,” the documents also say.

Former acting DHS Sec. Kevin McAleenan last year directed the department to start producing annual homeland threat assessments. POLITICO reviewed three drafts of this year’s report — titled DHS’s State of the Homeland Threat Assessment 2020 — all of which were produced in August. Ben Wittes, the editor in chief of the national security site Lawfare, obtained the documents and shared them with POLITICO. The first such assessment has not been released publicly, and a DHS spokesperson declined to comment on “allegedly leaked documents,” and on when the document will be made public.

None of the drafts POLITICO reviewed referred to a threat from Antifa, the loose cohort of militant left-leaning agitators who senior Trump administration officials have described as domestic terrorists. Two of the drafts refer to extremists trying to exploit the “social grievances” driving lawful protests.

-more-



https://www.csis.org/analysis/escalating-terrorism-problem-united-states

The Escalating Terrorism Problem in the United States
CSIS Briefs
June 17, 2020

THE ISSUE

The United States faces a growing terrorism problem that will likely worsen over the next year. Based on a CSIS data set of terrorist incidents, the most significant threat likely comes from white supremacists, though anarchists and religious extremists inspired by the Islamic State and al-Qaeda could present a potential threat as well. Over the rest of 2020, the terrorist threat in the United States will likely rise based on several factors, including the November 2020 presidential election.

On June 3, 2020, federal authorities arrested three individuals allegedly associated with the “boogaloo” movement, a loosely-organized group of extremists preparing for a civil war, for conspiring to cause violence in Las Vegas and possessing an improvised incendiary device.1 Less than a week later, law enforcement officials near Richmond, VA, arrested Harry H. Rogers, a member of the Ku Klux Klan, for driving a vehicle into peaceful protesters. Around the same time, members of a Brooklyn anarchist group urged its supporters to conduct “rebellion” against the government.2 Extremists from all sides flooded social media with disinformation, conspiracy theories, and incitements to violence in response to the protests following the death of George Floyd, swamping Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, and other platforms.3

This CSIS brief examines the state of terrorism in the United States. It asks two sets of questions. First, what are the most significant types of terrorism in the United States, and how has the terrorism threat in the U.S. homeland evolved over time? Second, what are the implications for terrorism over the next year? To answer these questions, this analysis compiles and analyzes an original data set of 893 terrorist plots and attacks in the United States between January 1994 and May 2020.

This analysis makes several arguments. First, far-right terrorism has significantly outpaced terrorism from other types of perpetrators, including from far-left networks and individuals inspired by the Islamic State and al-Qaeda. Right-wing attacks and plots account for the majority of all terrorist incidents in the United States since 1994, and the total number of right-wing attacks and plots has grown significantly during the past six years. Right-wing extremists perpetrated two thirds of the attacks and plots in the United States in 2019 and over 90 percent between January 1 and May 8, 2020. Second, terrorism in the United States will likely increase over the next year in response to several factors. One of the most concerning is the 2020 U.S. presidential election, before and after which extremists may resort to violence, depending on the outcome of the election. Far-right and far-left networks have used violence against each other at protests, raising the possibility of escalating violence during the election period.

The rest of this brief is divided into the following sections. The first defines terrorism and its main types. The second section analyzes terrorism trends in the United States since 1994. The third examines far-right, far-left, and religious networks. The fourth section highlights the terrorism threat over the next year.

-more-

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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#151 » by HarthorneWingo » Tue Sep 8, 2020 8:52 pm

Pointgod wrote:
HarthorneWingo wrote:Utah police shot up an unarmed 13 year old autistic boy (In the back while he ran from police) whose mother had called police for assistance bc the child was having a mental health episode.

Police accused the boy of threatening them with “a weapon.” No weapon as of yet has been identified.



https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/sep/08/linden-cameron-police-shooting-boy-autism-utah

“I said, ‘He’s unarmed, he doesn’t have anything, he just gets mad and he starts yelling and screaming,’” she said. “He’s a kid, he’s trying to get attention, he doesn’t know how to regulate.”

She added: “They’re supposed to come out and be able to de-escalate a situation using the most minimal force possible.”

Instead, she said, two officers went through the front door of the home and in less than five minutes were yelling “get down on the ground” before firing several shots.


They should all be arrested for attempted murder.
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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#152 » by BallSacBounce » Wed Sep 9, 2020 11:31 am

HarthorneWingo wrote:
Pointgod wrote:
HarthorneWingo wrote:Utah police shot up an unarmed 13 year old autistic boy (In the back while he ran from police) whose mother had called police for assistance bc the child was having a mental health episode.

Police accused the boy of threatening them with “a weapon.” No weapon as of yet has been identified.



https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/sep/08/linden-cameron-police-shooting-boy-autism-utah

“I said, ‘He’s unarmed, he doesn’t have anything, he just gets mad and he starts yelling and screaming,’” she said. “He’s a kid, he’s trying to get attention, he doesn’t know how to regulate.”

She added: “They’re supposed to come out and be able to de-escalate a situation using the most minimal force possible.”

Instead, she said, two officers went through the front door of the home and in less than five minutes were yelling “get down on the ground” before firing several shots.


They should all be arrested for attempted murder.

Depraved indifference to life is a recurring theme for some of these guys.
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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#153 » by Stannis » Fri Sep 11, 2020 7:44 pm

Not looking good tbh...

This account is reporting what what's going on in the court:

Read on Twitter
?s=20

There's much more tweets if you want to read
I believe he wasn't educated on the situation. Many people could have been harmed not only financially, physically, emotionally, spiritually. We do have freedom of speech, but there can be a lot of negative that comes with that

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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#154 » by Stannis » Fri Sep 11, 2020 7:47 pm

I'm not a lawyer or know anything about law, but I don't get the "drugs" angle? The knee to the neck was still the causation of death? If that doesn't happen Floyd lives...
I believe he wasn't educated on the situation. Many people could have been harmed not only financially, physically, emotionally, spiritually. We do have freedom of speech, but there can be a lot of negative that comes with that

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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#155 » by Stannis » Fri Sep 11, 2020 7:48 pm

Read on Twitter
?s=20
I believe he wasn't educated on the situation. Many people could have been harmed not only financially, physically, emotionally, spiritually. We do have freedom of speech, but there can be a lot of negative that comes with that

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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#156 » by BallSacBounce » Sat Sep 12, 2020 3:04 am

Stannis wrote:I'm not a lawyer or know anything about law, but I don't get the "drugs" angle? The knee to the neck was still the causation of death? If that doesn't happen Floyd lives...


He wasn't pronounced dead for at least an hour after the knee. So the defense is arguing drugs were a contributing factor at the least. Supposedly he had a "lethal" dose of fentanyl in his system but if course some people are more tolerant than others and I don't trust the police to be completely forthright in this type of situation. They protect their own of course.

Also apparently George Floyd had a prior arrest as an accused drug dealer where he allegedly tried to distract the officers, crying etc., while he ate the drugs. The judge disallowed this evidence.

So I suppose the officers were trying to argue given his past history, and his statements prior to the knee that he was having trouble breathing, they could possibly say in a way by harshly restraining they were trying to prevent a man who had already said he was having trouble breathing from ingesting more drugs.

My best guess.
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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#157 » by BallSacBounce » Sat Sep 12, 2020 3:16 am

HarthorneWingo wrote:Mayor of Rochester promises police reform after Daniel Prude murder.

https://www.inquirer.com/news/nation-world/rochester-mayor-promises-police-reform-daniel-prude-20200906.html

What do you think should be done in a Daniel Prude case? I have a tough time successfully configuring a clear path to dealing with a case like that.

High as a kite, what do you do? On PCP, does that change things? Sliding scale of possible actions? Who decides?
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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#158 » by HarthorneWingo » Sat Sep 12, 2020 6:15 am

BallSacBounce wrote:
HarthorneWingo wrote:Mayor of Rochester promises police reform after Daniel Prude murder.

https://www.inquirer.com/news/nation-world/rochester-mayor-promises-police-reform-daniel-prude-20200906.html

What do you think should be done in a Daniel Prude case? I have a tough time successfully configuring a clear path to dealing with a case like that.

High as a kite, what do you do? On PCP, does that change things? Sliding scale of possible actions? Who decides?


You send a team of mental health emergency assessment professionals who are trained to deal with the situation. You certainly don’t put a spit bag over his head and suffocate him to death. I hope we can agree on this part of the incident.

I think the state AG’s office should conduct a criminal investigation of the officers. The PD also needs to do a very transparent investigation overseen by the Chief and the Mayor.

I think the officers should lose their jobs. Supervisors and dispatchers heads may be on the block too. I have a hard time believing that there is not enough evidence for a successful prosecution. There is certainly evidence of callous disregard for human life, criminal recklessness.

Then, after municipality pays the Prude estate a large sum of money, it needs to figure out a better process for responding to these mental health emergencies. That function should be taken away from the local police particularly if no weapon is alleged to be involved.

This is yet another example of why we need to defund the police. At the very least, the police are not competent to understand the nature of the behavior they’re witnessing and having to deal with. The police do one thing. They make arrests. They are not here to help you.

Did you see the police shooting of the autistic boy whose mother called 911 and asked for a mental health emergency response unit and told the dispatcher that that her son was not a danger and do not have a weapon? I believe I posted the story earlier in this thread. The PF sent the wrong unit which shot the boy up while was running scared from them.
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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#159 » by BallSacBounce » Sat Sep 12, 2020 11:33 am

HarthorneWingo wrote:
BallSacBounce wrote:
HarthorneWingo wrote:Mayor of Rochester promises police reform after Daniel Prude murder.

https://www.inquirer.com/news/nation-world/rochester-mayor-promises-police-reform-daniel-prude-20200906.html

What do you think should be done in a Daniel Prude case? I have a tough time successfully configuring a clear path to dealing with a case like that.

High as a kite, what do you do? On PCP, does that change things? Sliding scale of possible actions? Who decides?


You send a team of mental health emergency assessment professionals Who are trained to deal with the situation. You certainly don’t put a spit big over his head and suffocate him to death. I hope we can agree on this part of the incident.

I think the state AG’s office should conduct a criminal investigation of the officers. The PD also needs to do a very transparent investigation overseen by the Chief and the Mayor.

I think the officers should lose their jobs. Supervisors and dispatchers head may be on the block too. I have a hard time believing that there is not enough evidence for a successful prosecution. There is certainly evidence of callous disregard for human life, criminal recklessness.

Then, after municipality pays the Prude estate a large sum of money, it needs to figure out to better respond to these mental health emergencies. That function should be taken away from the local police. Particularly if no weapon is alleged to be involved.

This is yet another example of why we need to defund the police. At the very least, the police are not competent to understand the nature of the behavior they’re witnessing And having to deal with. The police do one thing. They make arrests. They are not here to help you.

Did you see the police shooting of the autistic boy whose mother called 911 and asked for a mental health emergency response unit and told the dispatcher that that her son was not a danger and do not have a weapon? I believe I posted the story earlier in this thread. The PF sent the wrong unit which shot the boy up while was running scared from them.

This wasn't a mental health issue. He was high. In either case you also have to send the police in case he becomes dangerous. But yeah, a different type of response needs to be given.

No reason for Daniel Prude or the autistic boy to have ended up dead.

If juries won't convict on regular charges maybe we need separate cop charges for these types of things. Something has to happen to them. Something substantial.
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Re: George Floyd (and aftermath): Part 2 

Post#160 » by DickGrayson » Sat Sep 12, 2020 12:12 pm

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