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2021 Draft and College Basketball

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2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#1 » by bwgood77 » Tue Nov 24, 2020 7:34 pm

It definitely seems early, but guess what? This is the latest in the year we have EVER started the draft thread, but college basketball is starting this week.

With likely no pick in 2022, this will be our last draft...it's good we finally won't have to be focusing on the top 10 prospects (hopefully).

It's GoK time!

Cade Cunningham must be pretty good. http://www.tankathon.com/big_board

Some prospect info

Spoiler:
1. Cade Cunningham | 6-7, lead ballhandler | 19 years old, freshman | Oklahoma State
As mentioned above, I love the talent at the top of the 2021 NBA Draft. It’s a considerably deeper draft within the top half of the lottery than the 2020 iteration was. And yet, I still think of it as “The Cade Cunningham Draft” at this stage. He’s not only one of the best prospects I’ve evaluated at the high school level, but also one of my favorite players to watch. Everything about Cunningham looks likely to translate at a high level in the NBA, and he gets better every time I see him.

I wrote about Cunningham two-and-a-half years ago, back when I first saw him at Pangos All-American camp, and was stunned that he was considered just a borderline top-20 prospect in his recruiting class. That’s no longer the case. Over those nearly 30 months since I started writing about him, Cunningham has gone from being a future NBA wing with high feel for the game to a legit lead ballhandler who was the best player at the U19 World Cup as an underage player last year — while sharing a backcourt with 2020 lottery picks Kira Lewis Jr. and Tyrese Haliburton and emerging as the clear top dog.

He’s 6-foot-7 with a 7-foot wingspan, but plays point guard. His handle is very strong technically, and he’s rarely out of rhythm as a ballhandler. You can’t speed him up because of how well he plays through contact at his size. If you give him a ball screen and let him get downhill, he’ll go through guys at the rim and finish using his length to extend.

His best skill, though, is his passing ability. Cunningham can hit every read out of spread or side pick-and-rolls. He hits cross-corner kickouts and baseline drive-and-drifts with ease. He knows how to draw help defenders to hit the easy little drop off to his big. He whips one-handed passes with both his right and left hands. Everything is just so polished. In Oklahoma State’s spread offense under Mike Boynton, Cunningham is going to average seven assists per night with ease as long as his teammates hit shots.

On top of that, Cunningham is a diligent defender who really does an excellent job of reading what offensive players want to do, and making their life tough with his length. Unsurprisingly, he’s also great at using that length to create deflections and get into passing lanes.

The only real issue here is that he’s been a bit of an inconsistent shooter throughout his career. But a source at Oklahoma State told me that he’s come to preseason workouts and been the team’s second-best shooter behind 3-point marksman Ferron Flavors. If Cunningham is really a shooter now, it’s kind of a wrap for opponents because there isn’t really an easy way to stop him. I’d bet on Cunningham averaging something in the ballpark of 16 points, seven rebounds and seven assists at Oklahoma State this season, and being in the mix to win the national player of the year award. He is the big lead ballhandler that everyone is looking for, plus he has a real winner’s mentality that consistently leads to positive team play and good results.

2. Jalen Green | 6-5 guard | 18 years old | G League Ignite
Above all, Green is a live-wire athlete who mixes real quick-twitch and vertical pop with all sorts of body control and skill. He’s a highlight reel waiting to happen whenever he takes the court. That athleticism allows him to get separation at exceedingly high levels for step-backs as well as take off for massive dunks. Everything he does is just oozing with explosiveness.He also has a real skill level as a ballhandler and separator. The idea here is that he can be a legitimate three-level scorer because of his above-the-rim finishing and pull-up gifts.

On the AAU level, he got a bit inefficient and shot-happy at times, but he’s shown in Team USA settings that he can play within a scheme and either be the top dog as a scorer (as he showed when he won MVP of the 2018 U17 World Cup as a 16-year-old) or as more of a complementary piece (like he did at the 2019 U19 World Cup). He chose to pass on college basketball and will be training with the G League Ignite team in Walnut Creek, Calif.

3. Brandon Boston, Jr. | 6-7 wing | 19 years old, freshman | Kentucky
Boston is a super long scoring wing who has really emerged over the last 18 months as an elite, top-five level prospect. When Boston committed to Kentucky about a year ago, I wrote that I thought he was a creative wing who was very likely to hear his name called in the lottery, but that he needed to keep repping through his jumper to achieve his genuine top-five level upside. Over the last year, he’s worked tirelessly to improve that jumper and as he’s gotten stronger, it’s become easier for him to replicate his mechanics every time.

I think I’d bet on him being an average-plus shooter this year at Kentucky in terms of efficiency while taking difficult ones as opposed to being purely a volume guy. Beyond that, he’s a tough driver and ballhandler who can finish inside and plays with real aggressiveness when hunting his own shot. He’s going to average close to 20 per night at Kentucky this season as his mix of inside-out dribbles and crossovers going forward, paired with step-backs off the bounce, make him an impossible cover for college teams.

4. Jonathan Kuminga | 6-8 forward | 18 years old | G League Ignite
Kuminga is a terrific athlete with a great frame. He’s grown to be in the 6-foot-8 range with what looks to be a plus-four or plus-five wingspan. Thus far, he’s been productive at every level. He has an aggressive mindset out there every time he takes the floor, and can really create shots as a quick-twitch driver. he uses his leaping ability to finish well around the rim with ease. Again, the hope here is that he’s a three-level scorer who can be something of a centerpiece of a team if he continues on this trajectory offensively. He’s not just an offensive player, though. He’s also a terrific defender who alters shots from the weak side as a rim protector and who can switch onto multiple player types defensively. He’ll be with the G League Ignite after having bypassed college hoops this year.

5. Keon Johnson | 6-5 wing | 18 years old, freshman | Tennessee
Yeah, I’m just going to call my shot on this one. I think Johnson is an absolute stud despite the fact that he was ranked outside of the top-15 in his recruiting class. He’s one of the most explosive athletes in the country, a 6-foot-5 wing who can get wherever he wants on the court because of how sudden and powerful his movements are. Offensively, he’s a great driver and can finish way above the rim because of that quick-twitch athleticism. He’s also a developing shooter who clearly seems to have made some strides there, and he also plays unselfishly with solid passing ability. Defensively, he plays exceptionally hard and tries to impact the game by switching across the positional spectrum 1 through 3. He has a real desire to be great on defense. He’s the guy in this class that I expect to burst onto the scene and become something of a surprising top half of the lottery type of talent.

6. Evan Mobley | 7-0 center | 19 years old, freshman | USC
Mobley is one of the most interesting big prospects to come across college basketball in a while because of how easy it is to imagine him developing into a modern big while maintaining some real interior talent. He’s long and defends on the interior, plus has good enough feet to where he looks projectable as a perimeter and ball-screen defender. He really wants to be a force on that end, too, contesting everything. Offensively, he has great touch out to the midrange already and is developing his 3-point shot. He can face up and drive with ease and has a handle to get by defenders. He’s still working his way into his frame and developing his overall game. It’s going to take some time with Mobley. But he’s going to be very productive in college this year on both ends of the floor, and the ceiling is immensely high as long as he keeps working to develop all the flashes he has into consistent moments.

7. Ziaire Williams | 6-7 wing | 19 years old, freshman | Stanford
At 6-foot-7 with a 6-foot-11 wingspan, Williams has all the tools you look for in a prototypical two-way wing. He can defend multiple positions because of his athleticism and quickness. He gives a lot of effort on that end and generally is regarded as one of the most mature elite prospects in the class. On offense, he’s a high-flyer who really can get out on the break and finish, but more than that has real skills as a playmaking scorer. He loves to drive and play through contact despite the fact that he’s still extremely skinny. His first step is terrific and allows him to blow by, even if he’s still developing his versatility off the bounce. I’m also a believer in him becoming a consistent shooter because the mechanics are quite good and he can get to them off the pull-up with ease (even if the results weren’t always there in high school). More than anything though, he just doesn’t play like a goofball. He plays hard on both ends, he constantly moves on offense, and he plays unselfishly despite his skill.

8. Terrence Clarke | 6-7 wing | 19 years old, freshman | Kentucky
Clarke is a super slasher on the wing. He has a great first step and can get into the paint at will. He’s known as an above-the-rim finisher who has great lift off of one foot, but he also already has an impressive array of floater/touch shots from within eight feet. Kentucky really empowers guys to take those little midrange floaters, so I’d expect it to be a big part of his arsenal this year. He’s also a really impressive passer for his size. He sees over the defense and finds passing lanes that other guys just don’t.

The problems right now are that he’s an inconsistent shooter from outside of 15 feet, and he sometimes gets way over-aggressive and commits some wild turnovers. Whereas Boston will be the scoring phenom at Kentucky this year, I’d expect Clarke to be something of a problem solver due to the nature of his game. He can do a little bit of offensive initiation, he can defend guys at high levels, and he can go get a bucket when necessary. If the jumper comes, Clarke has real upside beyond even this level in 2021.

9. Scottie Barnes | 6-8 forward | 19 years old, freshman | Florida State
The prototypical “everything but the jumper” skill package. Elite-level potential on defense. He plays with an exceptional motor and has elite measurements at 6-8 with a 7-foot-2 wingspan. One of the very rare prospects who have actual 1 through 5 switchable potential on defense. Genuinely has All-Defensive Team upside at some point already at just 19 years old because of his ability to slide with quicker players. The key will be deriving enough value on offense to stay on the floor.

Generally, I think he can do that because he’s not a total non-factor on that end. He’s a really smart passer and playmaker for others, both from a standstill and on the move. He actually is expected to play some point guard this year at Florida State, although I see him more as a secondary guy at the NBA level. He moves well without the ball, and does a great job of intuitively taking advantage of 4 on 3 situations when he sees open teammates. Ultimately, he needs to show that he can do anything as a shooter at all, otherwise this might be too high for him. Given the importance of defensive versatility, though, I like Barnes to become a good NBA player.

10. Usman Garuba | 6-8 forward/center | 18 years old | Real Madrid
Garuba is this season’s early-career producer in Euroleague. He is a part-time starter for Real Madrid, one of the top teams in the world outside of the NBA. The big thing he brings to the table is defensive versatility. He’s one of the better teenage defensive prospects to emerge out of Europe in recent years. He has quick feet with slides in ball screen coverages, and his 7-foot-2 wingspan and body control on shot contests on the interior allows him to affect a ton of shots.

Offensively, he’s not particularly an explosive leaper and he doesn’t get downhill all that well as a roller, but he has great dexterity with the ball for his age and is a really underrated passer. The big key for him is continuing to develop the 3-point shot. Real Madrid has really allowed him to explore the studio space in ACB play this season, and he’s shooting just 4-for-25 from 3. If he were a better 3-point shooter, I would say that I think he’s a legit top-half of the lottery guy. But until we see that ironed out, he’s more just your baseline lottery big who can move his feet and help you in multiple ways.

11. Jalen Suggs | 6-5 guard | 19 years old, freshman | Gonzaga
Suggs has a shot to be the leading scorer on a Gonzaga team that is currently the favorite to win the national title this season. The 6-foot-5 guard is a tremendous scorer with fluid body control and great touch around the basket. He can also shoot it at a high level from deep. There is also some combo guard to his game as well, as he can make high-level dump-off passes and same-side kickouts after collapsing the defense as a driver. Unfortunately, there is a downside here, though: you’re going to get tired very quickly of hearing how he was a high school quarterback who won Minnesota’s Mr. Football award in addition to its Mr. Basketball award.

12. Caleb Love | 6-3 guard | 19 years old, freshman | North Carolina
Another scoring combo/lead guard here with Love. His handle is extremely tight and he can create plays with or without ball-screens. If a defender goes under a ball-screen with him, he has the ability to easily stop and pop from behind the 3-point line. But if you overplay him, he’ll beat you off the bounce with ease and get into the lane with quickness and tremendous footwork. Everything about his pull-up game is on-point right now for a teenage guard. It would be great for him to keep improving as a distributor and playmaker for others. That’s where his upside lies. But he might have enough talent as a scorer to where he just sticks regardless of the passing ability.

13. Daishen Nix | 6-5 guard | 18 years old | G League Ignite
Nix was one of the best passers and playmakers for others in the 2020 recruiting class, a big lead guard with great vision who constantly finds his teammates in advantageous spots. He’s also an impressive finisher at the rim. Despite not being a particularly explosive athlete, he plays at his own pace, changes speeds, and has absolutely elite footwork to maneuver around defenders in traffic. Loves the Euro step move at the rim to finish. The big question that he’ll need to answer is whether he can consistently separate from opposing players. Having said that though, I think I buy into his jumper from distance keeping defenders off-balance enough to help him get into the paint.

14. Keyontae Johnson | 6-5 wing | 21 years old, junior | Florida
NBA evaluators were surprised when Johnson decided not to enter the 2020 NBA Draft, as many thought he had a chance to turn into a late first-round pick after going through even the truncated process. Again, NBA teams are constantly on the lookout for wings who do two things: defend multiple positions and shoot. At 6-foot-5, 230 pounds, Johnson is a tank who can hit shots from distance, and then guard 1 through 4 at the collegiate level. By the end of SEC play last year, Johnson was one of the five best players in the conference and clearly earned All-SEC honors. Look for more of the same this year, and I’d expect he goes in round one in 2021.

15. Greg Brown | 6-8 forward | 19 years old, freshman | Texas
Brown is one of the more explosive athletes you’ll find in the 2021 class as a leaper. He’s a highlight reel waiting to happen as a dunker, but he is more than that. He has a great face-up game as a driver, and has some chance to shoot it off the catch as he continues to work through his mechanics. Defensively, he does a great job as a 4-man protecting the weak side of the rim. The key with Brown will be to keep working on upping his skill level overall beyond just being a crazy athlete, but he already has enough talent to get him into conversations for the lottery.

16. Moses Moody | 6-6 wing | 18 years old, freshman | Arkansas
This is the third player in my top 16 who played for Montverde Academy last season, along with Cunningham and Barnes. Yeah, there is a good reason they got discussed as potentially the best high school team in history. Moody is the prototypical 3-and-D guy, a high-level shooter from distance with great length who takes on tough wing defensive assignments. He could stand to improve his lateral quickness a bit, but Moody should average up over 15 points per game while hitting between 37 and 41 percent from 3 in Eric Musselman’s wide-open offensive attack.

17. Josh Christopher | 6-4 guard | 19 years old, freshman | Arizona State
Christopher is a three-level scoring guard who has one of the most polished repertoires of any incoming freshman in the country. His footwork is superb, and he can get to his spots with ease. He’s also very competitive and seems to really care about winning. Having said that, he’s probably not a good enough athlete to be a true creator at the NBA level, so his defensive effort needs to become more consistent. There is a role for him as a 3-and-D 2-guard at the next level, but he has to be willing to embrace that.

18. D.J. Steward | 6-3 guard | 19 years old, freshman | Duke
Steward is a fearless, high-scoring freshman out of Chicago who I would expect to lead Duke in scoring this season. He creates shots at will on offense. His pull-up game is pretty polished and sick, with sudden moves allowing him to create feet of separation going backward. He’s improved a lot as a jump shooter over the last year, too, to the point that he should be reliable as a central offensive figure in terms of efficiency. He’s just 6-foot-3, and he’s quite skinny, so he’d be best off putting on some weight and improving a bit as a distributor for others, but Steward’s scoring is so ridiculous that it puts him in the conversation to be a potential top 20 guy.

19. Jalen Johnson | 6-8 forward | 18 years old, freshman | Duke
Johnson is seen as the top recruit coming into Duke this season, and indeed I’d anticipate him having the biggest impact among its freshmen because his game will work well at the college level. He’s hyper-smart and plays with great feel. His best skill is his passing ability, as he’s always under control and keeps his head up to make plays for others. His body control and balance is terrific. The things that worry me here, though, are that Johnson is not a particularly high-level athlete, and while he has a reputation of being a good shooter, I don’t really love the mechanics because it’s a straight line drive jumper with a hitch. Still, he’s a smart player trending toward being a first-round pick.

20. James Bouknight | 6-5 wing | 20 years old, sophomore | Connecticut
Was one of the most impactful scoring freshmen in college basketball by the time late January rolled around in 2020. In his final 13 games, Bouknight averaged 17.2 points while shooting 45 percent from the field and 36 percent from 3. He’s an elite-level athlete in terms of leaping ability, and he has a real knowledge of how to get separation from defenders. He’s a live wire highlight waiting to happen in transition, plus has already proven he can knock down 3s. Hop aboard the Bouknight Bandwagon, because the train is leaving the station quickly.

21. Josh Giddey | 6-7 wing | 18 years old | Adelaide
Giddey has shot up the board for NBA teams over the last year and is considered a potential first-round pick as a Next Star in Australia. He’s 6-foot-7 and extremely skinny still, but his feel for the game is superb and he makes an impact across the board because he just knows how to play the game. He’s the youngest player to debut for the Australian national team since Ben Simmons. His passing ability — which is genuinely very high-level for his size — has seen him fashioned as something of a lead guard at youth levels in Australia, but I see him as more of a secondary playmaking wing long-term. He doesn’t quite have the necessary game off the bounce yet to create plays. Maybe it’ll come, but the good news is that Giddey should profile into that secondary playmaking role nicely because of his burgeoning shooting ability.

22. Chris Smith | 6-9 wing | 20 years old, senior | UCLA
Smith was very close to entering the 2020 NBA Draft, but returned to UCLA. He finally is starting to realize his immense potential, having morphed into an interesting shot-maker and defensive wing at his size. He can handle the ball comfortably at 6-foot-9, and his jump shot off the catch is real. The idea here is that he has the upside of someone like a Trevor Ariza as a big wing with some shooting and enough game off the bounce to keep defenses honest, while also playing solid defense himself. This will probably be the highest you’ll see Smith on a draft board, but I’m a believer in him being a high-level character kid who will continue to improve now that his confidence is right.

23. David Johnson | 6-5 guard | 20 years old, sophomore | Louisville
Johnson was one of my favorite prospects to emerge over the course of the 2019-20 season, as he made an immediate impact upon getting healthy for Louisville as a freshman. At 6-foot-5, he’s a high-level playmaker as a passer, making every live-dribble read that you can find in the book. He’s also a high-level defensive player who can swallow up opposing lead guards with his length. The critical input here will be the jump shot, as it’s still a bit too inconsistent at this stage. He spent the offseason repping out jumpers though, so we’ll see how it looks once he gets back. If Johnson is a threat as a jump shooter, I expect he’ll be one of the breakouts of the college hoops season and a first-round pick.

24. Roko Prkacin | 6-9 forward/center | 18 years old | Cibona
Prkacin is a weird big prospect in that he’s something of a multi-skilled and polished big man for his age, but doesn’t appear to have a particularly high ceiling despite his obvious talent. On the plus side, he clearly has a great feel for the game and a very polished skillset that allowed him to be productive even at Adriatic League level before turning 18. He has great dexterity with the ball, making plays as a passer and driver. Defensively, he wants to make an impact. The problem is that he’s a heavy-footed 6-foot-9 forward who may struggle a bit to defend in space at the NBA level. He’s also working through his jumper at this stage, a skill that will be essential to his NBA success. He’s too productive at too high of a level not to have here as a late first-, early second-rounder. I just wonder how it keeps translating as he moves up levels as a big.

25. Aaron Henry | 6-5 wing | 21 years old, junior | Michigan State
I’ve been a fan of Henry for a few years now, as he has a game that should translate nicely to the pros as soon as he starts to become more consistent with his performances. That started to come late in the season for Michigan State, as he became a more confident driver and attack-oriented player, averaging 12 points, six rebounds and three assists over his last eight games. Had the season not been suspended, he might be in the NBA right now. He’ll move into a more primary role this year for the Spartans, and I’d expect that as long as the jumper continues to be consistent, he’ll get a guaranteed deal in the NBA in 2021.

26. Ayo Dosunmu | 6-5 guard | 21 years old, junior | Illinois
Expected to leave school throughout the majority of his sophomore season, Dosunmu decided to return after leading Illinois to a terrific season that had it poised to make an NCAA Tournament run. Now, Illinois is (or at least should be) considered the favorite to win the Big Ten with a loaded roster returning. Dosunmu was arguably the most clutch player in college hoops last season, and while the 3-point number may point to regression, he actually got more comfortable as a shooter last year from the midrange area. The keys for Dosunmu are extending that range beyond the 3-point line, and continuing to refine his halfcourt game offensively. He’s considered an elite character kid, so evaluators want to buy into him. He just needs to keep improving the jumper and not stagnate. He’s one of my favorites for first-team All-America this year.

27. Corey Kispert | 6-7 wing | 22 years old, senior | Gonzaga
Had Kispert decided to turn pro after his junior season, he would have certainly gotten a guaranteed deal from an NBA team. In the end, he decided he wanted a final collegiate shot at the immortality of being the leader of Gonzaga’s first national champion. The translation for him to the NBA is pretty simple. He’s an elite-level shooter. He averaged 14 points per game while shooting 44 percent from 3 last season. His mechanics on the jump shot are absolutely pristine. I think he’s one of the safest bets of any returning player in college hoops to be a top-45 pick in this class.

28. Moussa Cisse | 6-10 center | 18 years old, freshman | Memphis
Cisse is just an absolutely ridiculous shot-blocker. Has a chance to be among the nation’s leaders this season, as he contests and affects nearly everything around the rim while maintaining his athleticism away from the hoop defensively. He has to figure out what to do on offense because right now he doesn’t process the game quick enough to be anything other than a catch-and-finish guy at the rim. He needs to be able to not get flustered and turn the ball over. But with a 7-foot-4 wingspan, he has the tools NBA teams look for in a prospect.

29. Jared Butler | 6-3 guard | 20 years old, junior | Baylor
I want to have Butler higher, but there wasn’t quite as much enthusiasm for him as I’d have hoped as he went through the pre-draft process this year before returning to Baylor. He didn’t get any assurances that he would be a guaranteed pick. So I have Butler at No. 29, as I think he’s going to have an absolutely monster season as a scorer. He has one of the most technically sound handles of any prospect I’ve seen, with the ability to get defenders off-balance with ease. He knocks down shots off the catch and off the bounce as a combo guard. I think he sticks as a bench guard in the NBA.

30. Terrence Shannon Jr. | 6-5 wing | 20 years old, sophomore | Texas Tech
Last season, word out of Texas Tech practices was that evaluators were more excited about the long-term potential of Shannon as opposed to that of one-and-done freshman Jahmi’us Ramsey. The latter had the All-Big 12 year, but I’d bet that those premonitions about Shannon end up getting proven right this draft cycle. He really struggled to shoot it as a freshman. However, he has all of the athletic tools that evaluators look for from the NBA wing position. He’s a lefty with high-flying leaping ability, great quick-twitch lateral athleticism, and the skills for dribbling, passing, shooting and defending.

31. Franz Wagner | 6-10 forward | 19 years old, sophomore | Michigan

32. Jeremiah Robinson-Earl | 6-10 forward | 20 years old, sophomore | Villanova

33. Isaiah Jackson | 6-10 center | 18 years old, freshman | Kentucky

34. Oscar Tshiebwe | 6-9 center | 20 years old, sophomore | West Virginia

35. Scottie Lewis | 6-5 wing | 20 years old, sophomore | Florida

36. Trendon Watford | 6-9 forward | 20 years old, sophomore | LSU

37. Marcus Garrett | 6-5 guard | 22 years old, senior | Kansas

38. Jaden Springer | 6-4 guard | 19 years old, freshman | Tennessee

39. Romeo Weems | 6-7 wing/forward | 20 years old, sophomore | DePaul

40. Trayce Jackson-Davis | 6-9 center | 20 years old, sophomore | Indiana

41. Matt Mitchell | 6-6 wing | 22 years old, senior | San Diego State

42. Carlos Alocen | 6-4 guard | 19 years old | Real Madrid

43. Marcus Zegarowski | 6-0 guard | 21 years old, junior | Creighton

44. Wendell Moore | 6-5 wing | 19 years old, sophomore | Duke

45. Cam Thomas | 6-3 guard | 18 years old, freshman | LSU

46. Miles McBride | 6-2 guard | 20 years old, sophomore | West Virginia

47. Yves Pons | 6-7 forward | 21 years old, senior | Tennessee

48. Matthew Hurt | 6-9 guard | 20 years old, sophomore | Duke

49. John Petty | 6-5 wing | 21 years old, senior | Alabama

50. Luka Garza | 6-11 center | 22 years old, junior | Iowa

51. Joe Wieskamp | 6-7 wing | 21 years old, junior | Iowa

52. Isaiah Todd | 6-9 forward | 19 years old | G League Ignite

53. Ibou Badji | 7-0 center | 18 years old | Barcelona

54. Aamir Simms | 6-8 forward | 22 years old, senior | Clemson

55. Chris Duarte | 6-5 guard | 22 years old, senior | Oregon

56. Samuell Williamson | 6-7 wing | 20 years old, sophomore | Louisville

57. AJ Lawson | 6-6 guard | 21 years old, junior | South Carolina

58. Joel Ayayi | 6-5 guard | 20 years old, junior | Gonzaga

59. Neemias Queta | 7-0 center | 21 years old, junior | Utah State

60. Derrick Alston Jr. | 6-9 wing | 22 years old, senior | Boise State
Bogyo
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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#2 » by Bogyo » Tue Nov 24, 2020 8:15 pm

Good thing this list goes on to the second round, becouse I'm pretty sure we'll pick somebody from there in the first round in the low 20s if you know what I mean ;)
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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#3 » by WeekapaugGroove » Tue Nov 24, 2020 8:18 pm

People who know more about this stuff than me all seem to LOVE this draft class.


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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#4 » by Ghost of Kleine » Wed Nov 25, 2020 3:10 am

bwgood77 wrote:It definitely seems early, but guess what? This is the latest in the year we have EVER started the draft thread, but college basketball is starting this week.

With likely no pick in 2022, this will be our last draft...it's good we finally won't have to be focusing on the top 10 prospects (hopefully).

It's GoK time!

Cade Cunningham must be pretty good. http://www.tankathon.com/big_board

Some prospect info

Spoiler:
1. Cade Cunningham | 6-7, lead ballhandler | 19 years old, freshman | Oklahoma State
As mentioned above, I love the talent at the top of the 2021 NBA Draft. It’s a considerably deeper draft within the top half of the lottery than the 2020 iteration was. And yet, I still think of it as “The Cade Cunningham Draft” at this stage. He’s not only one of the best prospects I’ve evaluated at the high school level, but also one of my favorite players to watch. Everything about Cunningham looks likely to translate at a high level in the NBA, and he gets better every time I see him.

I wrote about Cunningham two-and-a-half years ago, back when I first saw him at Pangos All-American camp, and was stunned that he was considered just a borderline top-20 prospect in his recruiting class. That’s no longer the case. Over those nearly 30 months since I started writing about him, Cunningham has gone from being a future NBA wing with high feel for the game to a legit lead ballhandler who was the best player at the U19 World Cup as an underage player last year — while sharing a backcourt with 2020 lottery picks Kira Lewis Jr. and Tyrese Haliburton and emerging as the clear top dog.

He’s 6-foot-7 with a 7-foot wingspan, but plays point guard. His handle is very strong technically, and he’s rarely out of rhythm as a ballhandler. You can’t speed him up because of how well he plays through contact at his size. If you give him a ball screen and let him get downhill, he’ll go through guys at the rim and finish using his length to extend.

His best skill, though, is his passing ability. Cunningham can hit every read out of spread or side pick-and-rolls. He hits cross-corner kickouts and baseline drive-and-drifts with ease. He knows how to draw help defenders to hit the easy little drop off to his big. He whips one-handed passes with both his right and left hands. Everything is just so polished. In Oklahoma State’s spread offense under Mike Boynton, Cunningham is going to average seven assists per night with ease as long as his teammates hit shots.

On top of that, Cunningham is a diligent defender who really does an excellent job of reading what offensive players want to do, and making their life tough with his length. Unsurprisingly, he’s also great at using that length to create deflections and get into passing lanes.

The only real issue here is that he’s been a bit of an inconsistent shooter throughout his career. But a source at Oklahoma State told me that he’s come to preseason workouts and been the team’s second-best shooter behind 3-point marksman Ferron Flavors. If Cunningham is really a shooter now, it’s kind of a wrap for opponents because there isn’t really an easy way to stop him. I’d bet on Cunningham averaging something in the ballpark of 16 points, seven rebounds and seven assists at Oklahoma State this season, and being in the mix to win the national player of the year award. He is the big lead ballhandler that everyone is looking for, plus he has a real winner’s mentality that consistently leads to positive team play and good results.

2. Jalen Green | 6-5 guard | 18 years old | G League Ignite
Above all, Green is a live-wire athlete who mixes real quick-twitch and vertical pop with all sorts of body control and skill. He’s a highlight reel waiting to happen whenever he takes the court. That athleticism allows him to get separation at exceedingly high levels for step-backs as well as take off for massive dunks. Everything he does is just oozing with explosiveness.He also has a real skill level as a ballhandler and separator. The idea here is that he can be a legitimate three-level scorer because of his above-the-rim finishing and pull-up gifts.

On the AAU level, he got a bit inefficient and shot-happy at times, but he’s shown in Team USA settings that he can play within a scheme and either be the top dog as a scorer (as he showed when he won MVP of the 2018 U17 World Cup as a 16-year-old) or as more of a complementary piece (like he did at the 2019 U19 World Cup). He chose to pass on college basketball and will be training with the G League Ignite team in Walnut Creek, Calif.

3. Brandon Boston, Jr. | 6-7 wing | 19 years old, freshman | Kentucky
Boston is a super long scoring wing who has really emerged over the last 18 months as an elite, top-five level prospect. When Boston committed to Kentucky about a year ago, I wrote that I thought he was a creative wing who was very likely to hear his name called in the lottery, but that he needed to keep repping through his jumper to achieve his genuine top-five level upside. Over the last year, he’s worked tirelessly to improve that jumper and as he’s gotten stronger, it’s become easier for him to replicate his mechanics every time.

I think I’d bet on him being an average-plus shooter this year at Kentucky in terms of efficiency while taking difficult ones as opposed to being purely a volume guy. Beyond that, he’s a tough driver and ballhandler who can finish inside and plays with real aggressiveness when hunting his own shot. He’s going to average close to 20 per night at Kentucky this season as his mix of inside-out dribbles and crossovers going forward, paired with step-backs off the bounce, make him an impossible cover for college teams.

4. Jonathan Kuminga | 6-8 forward | 18 years old | G League Ignite
Kuminga is a terrific athlete with a great frame. He’s grown to be in the 6-foot-8 range with what looks to be a plus-four or plus-five wingspan. Thus far, he’s been productive at every level. He has an aggressive mindset out there every time he takes the floor, and can really create shots as a quick-twitch driver. he uses his leaping ability to finish well around the rim with ease. Again, the hope here is that he’s a three-level scorer who can be something of a centerpiece of a team if he continues on this trajectory offensively. He’s not just an offensive player, though. He’s also a terrific defender who alters shots from the weak side as a rim protector and who can switch onto multiple player types defensively. He’ll be with the G League Ignite after having bypassed college hoops this year.

5. Keon Johnson | 6-5 wing | 18 years old, freshman | Tennessee
Yeah, I’m just going to call my shot on this one. I think Johnson is an absolute stud despite the fact that he was ranked outside of the top-15 in his recruiting class. He’s one of the most explosive athletes in the country, a 6-foot-5 wing who can get wherever he wants on the court because of how sudden and powerful his movements are. Offensively, he’s a great driver and can finish way above the rim because of that quick-twitch athleticism. He’s also a developing shooter who clearly seems to have made some strides there, and he also plays unselfishly with solid passing ability. Defensively, he plays exceptionally hard and tries to impact the game by switching across the positional spectrum 1 through 3. He has a real desire to be great on defense. He’s the guy in this class that I expect to burst onto the scene and become something of a surprising top half of the lottery type of talent.

6. Evan Mobley | 7-0 center | 19 years old, freshman | USC
Mobley is one of the most interesting big prospects to come across college basketball in a while because of how easy it is to imagine him developing into a modern big while maintaining some real interior talent. He’s long and defends on the interior, plus has good enough feet to where he looks projectable as a perimeter and ball-screen defender. He really wants to be a force on that end, too, contesting everything. Offensively, he has great touch out to the midrange already and is developing his 3-point shot. He can face up and drive with ease and has a handle to get by defenders. He’s still working his way into his frame and developing his overall game. It’s going to take some time with Mobley. But he’s going to be very productive in college this year on both ends of the floor, and the ceiling is immensely high as long as he keeps working to develop all the flashes he has into consistent moments.

7. Ziaire Williams | 6-7 wing | 19 years old, freshman | Stanford
At 6-foot-7 with a 6-foot-11 wingspan, Williams has all the tools you look for in a prototypical two-way wing. He can defend multiple positions because of his athleticism and quickness. He gives a lot of effort on that end and generally is regarded as one of the most mature elite prospects in the class. On offense, he’s a high-flyer who really can get out on the break and finish, but more than that has real skills as a playmaking scorer. He loves to drive and play through contact despite the fact that he’s still extremely skinny. His first step is terrific and allows him to blow by, even if he’s still developing his versatility off the bounce. I’m also a believer in him becoming a consistent shooter because the mechanics are quite good and he can get to them off the pull-up with ease (even if the results weren’t always there in high school). More than anything though, he just doesn’t play like a goofball. He plays hard on both ends, he constantly moves on offense, and he plays unselfishly despite his skill.

8. Terrence Clarke | 6-7 wing | 19 years old, freshman | Kentucky
Clarke is a super slasher on the wing. He has a great first step and can get into the paint at will. He’s known as an above-the-rim finisher who has great lift off of one foot, but he also already has an impressive array of floater/touch shots from within eight feet. Kentucky really empowers guys to take those little midrange floaters, so I’d expect it to be a big part of his arsenal this year. He’s also a really impressive passer for his size. He sees over the defense and finds passing lanes that other guys just don’t.

The problems right now are that he’s an inconsistent shooter from outside of 15 feet, and he sometimes gets way over-aggressive and commits some wild turnovers. Whereas Boston will be the scoring phenom at Kentucky this year, I’d expect Clarke to be something of a problem solver due to the nature of his game. He can do a little bit of offensive initiation, he can defend guys at high levels, and he can go get a bucket when necessary. If the jumper comes, Clarke has real upside beyond even this level in 2021.

9. Scottie Barnes | 6-8 forward | 19 years old, freshman | Florida State
The prototypical “everything but the jumper” skill package. Elite-level potential on defense. He plays with an exceptional motor and has elite measurements at 6-8 with a 7-foot-2 wingspan. One of the very rare prospects who have actual 1 through 5 switchable potential on defense. Genuinely has All-Defensive Team upside at some point already at just 19 years old because of his ability to slide with quicker players. The key will be deriving enough value on offense to stay on the floor.

Generally, I think he can do that because he’s not a total non-factor on that end. He’s a really smart passer and playmaker for others, both from a standstill and on the move. He actually is expected to play some point guard this year at Florida State, although I see him more as a secondary guy at the NBA level. He moves well without the ball, and does a great job of intuitively taking advantage of 4 on 3 situations when he sees open teammates. Ultimately, he needs to show that he can do anything as a shooter at all, otherwise this might be too high for him. Given the importance of defensive versatility, though, I like Barnes to become a good NBA player.

10. Usman Garuba | 6-8 forward/center | 18 years old | Real Madrid
Garuba is this season’s early-career producer in Euroleague. He is a part-time starter for Real Madrid, one of the top teams in the world outside of the NBA. The big thing he brings to the table is defensive versatility. He’s one of the better teenage defensive prospects to emerge out of Europe in recent years. He has quick feet with slides in ball screen coverages, and his 7-foot-2 wingspan and body control on shot contests on the interior allows him to affect a ton of shots.

Offensively, he’s not particularly an explosive leaper and he doesn’t get downhill all that well as a roller, but he has great dexterity with the ball for his age and is a really underrated passer. The big key for him is continuing to develop the 3-point shot. Real Madrid has really allowed him to explore the studio space in ACB play this season, and he’s shooting just 4-for-25 from 3. If he were a better 3-point shooter, I would say that I think he’s a legit top-half of the lottery guy. But until we see that ironed out, he’s more just your baseline lottery big who can move his feet and help you in multiple ways.

11. Jalen Suggs | 6-5 guard | 19 years old, freshman | Gonzaga
Suggs has a shot to be the leading scorer on a Gonzaga team that is currently the favorite to win the national title this season. The 6-foot-5 guard is a tremendous scorer with fluid body control and great touch around the basket. He can also shoot it at a high level from deep. There is also some combo guard to his game as well, as he can make high-level dump-off passes and same-side kickouts after collapsing the defense as a driver. Unfortunately, there is a downside here, though: you’re going to get tired very quickly of hearing how he was a high school quarterback who won Minnesota’s Mr. Football award in addition to its Mr. Basketball award.

12. Caleb Love | 6-3 guard | 19 years old, freshman | North Carolina
Another scoring combo/lead guard here with Love. His handle is extremely tight and he can create plays with or without ball-screens. If a defender goes under a ball-screen with him, he has the ability to easily stop and pop from behind the 3-point line. But if you overplay him, he’ll beat you off the bounce with ease and get into the lane with quickness and tremendous footwork. Everything about his pull-up game is on-point right now for a teenage guard. It would be great for him to keep improving as a distributor and playmaker for others. That’s where his upside lies. But he might have enough talent as a scorer to where he just sticks regardless of the passing ability.

13. Daishen Nix | 6-5 guard | 18 years old | G League Ignite
Nix was one of the best passers and playmakers for others in the 2020 recruiting class, a big lead guard with great vision who constantly finds his teammates in advantageous spots. He’s also an impressive finisher at the rim. Despite not being a particularly explosive athlete, he plays at his own pace, changes speeds, and has absolutely elite footwork to maneuver around defenders in traffic. Loves the Euro step move at the rim to finish. The big question that he’ll need to answer is whether he can consistently separate from opposing players. Having said that though, I think I buy into his jumper from distance keeping defenders off-balance enough to help him get into the paint.

14. Keyontae Johnson | 6-5 wing | 21 years old, junior | Florida
NBA evaluators were surprised when Johnson decided not to enter the 2020 NBA Draft, as many thought he had a chance to turn into a late first-round pick after going through even the truncated process. Again, NBA teams are constantly on the lookout for wings who do two things: defend multiple positions and shoot. At 6-foot-5, 230 pounds, Johnson is a tank who can hit shots from distance, and then guard 1 through 4 at the collegiate level. By the end of SEC play last year, Johnson was one of the five best players in the conference and clearly earned All-SEC honors. Look for more of the same this year, and I’d expect he goes in round one in 2021.

15. Greg Brown | 6-8 forward | 19 years old, freshman | Texas
Brown is one of the more explosive athletes you’ll find in the 2021 class as a leaper. He’s a highlight reel waiting to happen as a dunker, but he is more than that. He has a great face-up game as a driver, and has some chance to shoot it off the catch as he continues to work through his mechanics. Defensively, he does a great job as a 4-man protecting the weak side of the rim. The key with Brown will be to keep working on upping his skill level overall beyond just being a crazy athlete, but he already has enough talent to get him into conversations for the lottery.

16. Moses Moody | 6-6 wing | 18 years old, freshman | Arkansas
This is the third player in my top 16 who played for Montverde Academy last season, along with Cunningham and Barnes. Yeah, there is a good reason they got discussed as potentially the best high school team in history. Moody is the prototypical 3-and-D guy, a high-level shooter from distance with great length who takes on tough wing defensive assignments. He could stand to improve his lateral quickness a bit, but Moody should average up over 15 points per game while hitting between 37 and 41 percent from 3 in Eric Musselman’s wide-open offensive attack.

17. Josh Christopher | 6-4 guard | 19 years old, freshman | Arizona State
Christopher is a three-level scoring guard who has one of the most polished repertoires of any incoming freshman in the country. His footwork is superb, and he can get to his spots with ease. He’s also very competitive and seems to really care about winning. Having said that, he’s probably not a good enough athlete to be a true creator at the NBA level, so his defensive effort needs to become more consistent. There is a role for him as a 3-and-D 2-guard at the next level, but he has to be willing to embrace that.

18. D.J. Steward | 6-3 guard | 19 years old, freshman | Duke
Steward is a fearless, high-scoring freshman out of Chicago who I would expect to lead Duke in scoring this season. He creates shots at will on offense. His pull-up game is pretty polished and sick, with sudden moves allowing him to create feet of separation going backward. He’s improved a lot as a jump shooter over the last year, too, to the point that he should be reliable as a central offensive figure in terms of efficiency. He’s just 6-foot-3, and he’s quite skinny, so he’d be best off putting on some weight and improving a bit as a distributor for others, but Steward’s scoring is so ridiculous that it puts him in the conversation to be a potential top 20 guy.

19. Jalen Johnson | 6-8 forward | 18 years old, freshman | Duke
Johnson is seen as the top recruit coming into Duke this season, and indeed I’d anticipate him having the biggest impact among its freshmen because his game will work well at the college level. He’s hyper-smart and plays with great feel. His best skill is his passing ability, as he’s always under control and keeps his head up to make plays for others. His body control and balance is terrific. The things that worry me here, though, are that Johnson is not a particularly high-level athlete, and while he has a reputation of being a good shooter, I don’t really love the mechanics because it’s a straight line drive jumper with a hitch. Still, he’s a smart player trending toward being a first-round pick.

20. James Bouknight | 6-5 wing | 20 years old, sophomore | Connecticut
Was one of the most impactful scoring freshmen in college basketball by the time late January rolled around in 2020. In his final 13 games, Bouknight averaged 17.2 points while shooting 45 percent from the field and 36 percent from 3. He’s an elite-level athlete in terms of leaping ability, and he has a real knowledge of how to get separation from defenders. He’s a live wire highlight waiting to happen in transition, plus has already proven he can knock down 3s. Hop aboard the Bouknight Bandwagon, because the train is leaving the station quickly.

21. Josh Giddey | 6-7 wing | 18 years old | Adelaide
Giddey has shot up the board for NBA teams over the last year and is considered a potential first-round pick as a Next Star in Australia. He’s 6-foot-7 and extremely skinny still, but his feel for the game is superb and he makes an impact across the board because he just knows how to play the game. He’s the youngest player to debut for the Australian national team since Ben Simmons. His passing ability — which is genuinely very high-level for his size — has seen him fashioned as something of a lead guard at youth levels in Australia, but I see him as more of a secondary playmaking wing long-term. He doesn’t quite have the necessary game off the bounce yet to create plays. Maybe it’ll come, but the good news is that Giddey should profile into that secondary playmaking role nicely because of his burgeoning shooting ability.

22. Chris Smith | 6-9 wing | 20 years old, senior | UCLA
Smith was very close to entering the 2020 NBA Draft, but returned to UCLA. He finally is starting to realize his immense potential, having morphed into an interesting shot-maker and defensive wing at his size. He can handle the ball comfortably at 6-foot-9, and his jump shot off the catch is real. The idea here is that he has the upside of someone like a Trevor Ariza as a big wing with some shooting and enough game off the bounce to keep defenses honest, while also playing solid defense himself. This will probably be the highest you’ll see Smith on a draft board, but I’m a believer in him being a high-level character kid who will continue to improve now that his confidence is right.

23. David Johnson | 6-5 guard | 20 years old, sophomore | Louisville
Johnson was one of my favorite prospects to emerge over the course of the 2019-20 season, as he made an immediate impact upon getting healthy for Louisville as a freshman. At 6-foot-5, he’s a high-level playmaker as a passer, making every live-dribble read that you can find in the book. He’s also a high-level defensive player who can swallow up opposing lead guards with his length. The critical input here will be the jump shot, as it’s still a bit too inconsistent at this stage. He spent the offseason repping out jumpers though, so we’ll see how it looks once he gets back. If Johnson is a threat as a jump shooter, I expect he’ll be one of the breakouts of the college hoops season and a first-round pick.

24. Roko Prkacin | 6-9 forward/center | 18 years old | Cibona
Prkacin is a weird big prospect in that he’s something of a multi-skilled and polished big man for his age, but doesn’t appear to have a particularly high ceiling despite his obvious talent. On the plus side, he clearly has a great feel for the game and a very polished skillset that allowed him to be productive even at Adriatic League level before turning 18. He has great dexterity with the ball, making plays as a passer and driver. Defensively, he wants to make an impact. The problem is that he’s a heavy-footed 6-foot-9 forward who may struggle a bit to defend in space at the NBA level. He’s also working through his jumper at this stage, a skill that will be essential to his NBA success. He’s too productive at too high of a level not to have here as a late first-, early second-rounder. I just wonder how it keeps translating as he moves up levels as a big.

25. Aaron Henry | 6-5 wing | 21 years old, junior | Michigan State
I’ve been a fan of Henry for a few years now, as he has a game that should translate nicely to the pros as soon as he starts to become more consistent with his performances. That started to come late in the season for Michigan State, as he became a more confident driver and attack-oriented player, averaging 12 points, six rebounds and three assists over his last eight games. Had the season not been suspended, he might be in the NBA right now. He’ll move into a more primary role this year for the Spartans, and I’d expect that as long as the jumper continues to be consistent, he’ll get a guaranteed deal in the NBA in 2021.

26. Ayo Dosunmu | 6-5 guard | 21 years old, junior | Illinois
Expected to leave school throughout the majority of his sophomore season, Dosunmu decided to return after leading Illinois to a terrific season that had it poised to make an NCAA Tournament run. Now, Illinois is (or at least should be) considered the favorite to win the Big Ten with a loaded roster returning. Dosunmu was arguably the most clutch player in college hoops last season, and while the 3-point number may point to regression, he actually got more comfortable as a shooter last year from the midrange area. The keys for Dosunmu are extending that range beyond the 3-point line, and continuing to refine his halfcourt game offensively. He’s considered an elite character kid, so evaluators want to buy into him. He just needs to keep improving the jumper and not stagnate. He’s one of my favorites for first-team All-America this year.

27. Corey Kispert | 6-7 wing | 22 years old, senior | Gonzaga
Had Kispert decided to turn pro after his junior season, he would have certainly gotten a guaranteed deal from an NBA team. In the end, he decided he wanted a final collegiate shot at the immortality of being the leader of Gonzaga’s first national champion. The translation for him to the NBA is pretty simple. He’s an elite-level shooter. He averaged 14 points per game while shooting 44 percent from 3 last season. His mechanics on the jump shot are absolutely pristine. I think he’s one of the safest bets of any returning player in college hoops to be a top-45 pick in this class.

28. Moussa Cisse | 6-10 center | 18 years old, freshman | Memphis
Cisse is just an absolutely ridiculous shot-blocker. Has a chance to be among the nation’s leaders this season, as he contests and affects nearly everything around the rim while maintaining his athleticism away from the hoop defensively. He has to figure out what to do on offense because right now he doesn’t process the game quick enough to be anything other than a catch-and-finish guy at the rim. He needs to be able to not get flustered and turn the ball over. But with a 7-foot-4 wingspan, he has the tools NBA teams look for in a prospect.

29. Jared Butler | 6-3 guard | 20 years old, junior | Baylor
I want to have Butler higher, but there wasn’t quite as much enthusiasm for him as I’d have hoped as he went through the pre-draft process this year before returning to Baylor. He didn’t get any assurances that he would be a guaranteed pick. So I have Butler at No. 29, as I think he’s going to have an absolutely monster season as a scorer. He has one of the most technically sound handles of any prospect I’ve seen, with the ability to get defenders off-balance with ease. He knocks down shots off the catch and off the bounce as a combo guard. I think he sticks as a bench guard in the NBA.

30. Terrence Shannon Jr. | 6-5 wing | 20 years old, sophomore | Texas Tech
Last season, word out of Texas Tech practices was that evaluators were more excited about the long-term potential of Shannon as opposed to that of one-and-done freshman Jahmi’us Ramsey. The latter had the All-Big 12 year, but I’d bet that those premonitions about Shannon end up getting proven right this draft cycle. He really struggled to shoot it as a freshman. However, he has all of the athletic tools that evaluators look for from the NBA wing position. He’s a lefty with high-flying leaping ability, great quick-twitch lateral athleticism, and the skills for dribbling, passing, shooting and defending.

31. Franz Wagner | 6-10 forward | 19 years old, sophomore | Michigan

32. Jeremiah Robinson-Earl | 6-10 forward | 20 years old, sophomore | Villanova

33. Isaiah Jackson | 6-10 center | 18 years old, freshman | Kentucky

34. Oscar Tshiebwe | 6-9 center | 20 years old, sophomore | West Virginia

35. Scottie Lewis | 6-5 wing | 20 years old, sophomore | Florida

36. Trendon Watford | 6-9 forward | 20 years old, sophomore | LSU

37. Marcus Garrett | 6-5 guard | 22 years old, senior | Kansas

38. Jaden Springer | 6-4 guard | 19 years old, freshman | Tennessee

39. Romeo Weems | 6-7 wing/forward | 20 years old, sophomore | DePaul

40. Trayce Jackson-Davis | 6-9 center | 20 years old, sophomore | Indiana

41. Matt Mitchell | 6-6 wing | 22 years old, senior | San Diego State

42. Carlos Alocen | 6-4 guard | 19 years old | Real Madrid

43. Marcus Zegarowski | 6-0 guard | 21 years old, junior | Creighton

44. Wendell Moore | 6-5 wing | 19 years old, sophomore | Duke

45. Cam Thomas | 6-3 guard | 18 years old, freshman | LSU

46. Miles McBride | 6-2 guard | 20 years old, sophomore | West Virginia

47. Yves Pons | 6-7 forward | 21 years old, senior | Tennessee

48. Matthew Hurt | 6-9 guard | 20 years old, sophomore | Duke

49. John Petty | 6-5 wing | 21 years old, senior | Alabama

50. Luka Garza | 6-11 center | 22 years old, junior | Iowa

51. Joe Wieskamp | 6-7 wing | 21 years old, junior | Iowa

52. Isaiah Todd | 6-9 forward | 19 years old | G League Ignite

53. Ibou Badji | 7-0 center | 18 years old | Barcelona

54. Aamir Simms | 6-8 forward | 22 years old, senior | Clemson

55. Chris Duarte | 6-5 guard | 22 years old, senior | Oregon

56. Samuell Williamson | 6-7 wing | 20 years old, sophomore | Louisville

57. AJ Lawson | 6-6 guard | 21 years old, junior | South Carolina

58. Joel Ayayi | 6-5 guard | 20 years old, junior | Gonzaga

59. Neemias Queta | 7-0 center | 21 years old, junior | Utah State

60. Derrick Alston Jr. | 6-9 wing | 22 years old, senior | Boise State


Lol! That it is man. :wink:
But I'm going to perhaps shock a few people here and hold off on the draft speculation ( in majority) until we near the end of the season, And see how our depth benefits us. I will pose the question to you though man. Where would you GUESTIMATE us finishing ( draft range) if everything plays out best outcome for us? My guess will be in the 18- 24 range.

Also, If prioritizing a long term guard prospect outside of the lottery, Do you have any specific favorites in that range if the mid to late lottery? Nembhard? Nix? Roach? Or perhaps even Giddy? ( Intriguing size at 6'8) solid IQ, solid passer? I'm really intrigued to see how things play out, But will also be looking to see which positions ( guard/ wing/ center) will require long term consideration the most. :D
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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#5 » by bwgood77 » Wed Nov 25, 2020 4:38 am

Ghost of Kleine wrote:
bwgood77 wrote:It definitely seems early, but guess what? This is the latest in the year we have EVER started the draft thread, but college basketball is starting this week.

With likely no pick in 2022, this will be our last draft...it's good we finally won't have to be focusing on the top 10 prospects (hopefully).

It's GoK time!

Cade Cunningham must be pretty good. http://www.tankathon.com/big_board

Some prospect info

Spoiler:
1. Cade Cunningham | 6-7, lead ballhandler | 19 years old, freshman | Oklahoma State
As mentioned above, I love the talent at the top of the 2021 NBA Draft. It’s a considerably deeper draft within the top half of the lottery than the 2020 iteration was. And yet, I still think of it as “The Cade Cunningham Draft” at this stage. He’s not only one of the best prospects I’ve evaluated at the high school level, but also one of my favorite players to watch. Everything about Cunningham looks likely to translate at a high level in the NBA, and he gets better every time I see him.

I wrote about Cunningham two-and-a-half years ago, back when I first saw him at Pangos All-American camp, and was stunned that he was considered just a borderline top-20 prospect in his recruiting class. That’s no longer the case. Over those nearly 30 months since I started writing about him, Cunningham has gone from being a future NBA wing with high feel for the game to a legit lead ballhandler who was the best player at the U19 World Cup as an underage player last year — while sharing a backcourt with 2020 lottery picks Kira Lewis Jr. and Tyrese Haliburton and emerging as the clear top dog.

He’s 6-foot-7 with a 7-foot wingspan, but plays point guard. His handle is very strong technically, and he’s rarely out of rhythm as a ballhandler. You can’t speed him up because of how well he plays through contact at his size. If you give him a ball screen and let him get downhill, he’ll go through guys at the rim and finish using his length to extend.

His best skill, though, is his passing ability. Cunningham can hit every read out of spread or side pick-and-rolls. He hits cross-corner kickouts and baseline drive-and-drifts with ease. He knows how to draw help defenders to hit the easy little drop off to his big. He whips one-handed passes with both his right and left hands. Everything is just so polished. In Oklahoma State’s spread offense under Mike Boynton, Cunningham is going to average seven assists per night with ease as long as his teammates hit shots.

On top of that, Cunningham is a diligent defender who really does an excellent job of reading what offensive players want to do, and making their life tough with his length. Unsurprisingly, he’s also great at using that length to create deflections and get into passing lanes.

The only real issue here is that he’s been a bit of an inconsistent shooter throughout his career. But a source at Oklahoma State told me that he’s come to preseason workouts and been the team’s second-best shooter behind 3-point marksman Ferron Flavors. If Cunningham is really a shooter now, it’s kind of a wrap for opponents because there isn’t really an easy way to stop him. I’d bet on Cunningham averaging something in the ballpark of 16 points, seven rebounds and seven assists at Oklahoma State this season, and being in the mix to win the national player of the year award. He is the big lead ballhandler that everyone is looking for, plus he has a real winner’s mentality that consistently leads to positive team play and good results.

2. Jalen Green | 6-5 guard | 18 years old | G League Ignite
Above all, Green is a live-wire athlete who mixes real quick-twitch and vertical pop with all sorts of body control and skill. He’s a highlight reel waiting to happen whenever he takes the court. That athleticism allows him to get separation at exceedingly high levels for step-backs as well as take off for massive dunks. Everything he does is just oozing with explosiveness.He also has a real skill level as a ballhandler and separator. The idea here is that he can be a legitimate three-level scorer because of his above-the-rim finishing and pull-up gifts.

On the AAU level, he got a bit inefficient and shot-happy at times, but he’s shown in Team USA settings that he can play within a scheme and either be the top dog as a scorer (as he showed when he won MVP of the 2018 U17 World Cup as a 16-year-old) or as more of a complementary piece (like he did at the 2019 U19 World Cup). He chose to pass on college basketball and will be training with the G League Ignite team in Walnut Creek, Calif.

3. Brandon Boston, Jr. | 6-7 wing | 19 years old, freshman | Kentucky
Boston is a super long scoring wing who has really emerged over the last 18 months as an elite, top-five level prospect. When Boston committed to Kentucky about a year ago, I wrote that I thought he was a creative wing who was very likely to hear his name called in the lottery, but that he needed to keep repping through his jumper to achieve his genuine top-five level upside. Over the last year, he’s worked tirelessly to improve that jumper and as he’s gotten stronger, it’s become easier for him to replicate his mechanics every time.

I think I’d bet on him being an average-plus shooter this year at Kentucky in terms of efficiency while taking difficult ones as opposed to being purely a volume guy. Beyond that, he’s a tough driver and ballhandler who can finish inside and plays with real aggressiveness when hunting his own shot. He’s going to average close to 20 per night at Kentucky this season as his mix of inside-out dribbles and crossovers going forward, paired with step-backs off the bounce, make him an impossible cover for college teams.

4. Jonathan Kuminga | 6-8 forward | 18 years old | G League Ignite
Kuminga is a terrific athlete with a great frame. He’s grown to be in the 6-foot-8 range with what looks to be a plus-four or plus-five wingspan. Thus far, he’s been productive at every level. He has an aggressive mindset out there every time he takes the floor, and can really create shots as a quick-twitch driver. he uses his leaping ability to finish well around the rim with ease. Again, the hope here is that he’s a three-level scorer who can be something of a centerpiece of a team if he continues on this trajectory offensively. He’s not just an offensive player, though. He’s also a terrific defender who alters shots from the weak side as a rim protector and who can switch onto multiple player types defensively. He’ll be with the G League Ignite after having bypassed college hoops this year.

5. Keon Johnson | 6-5 wing | 18 years old, freshman | Tennessee
Yeah, I’m just going to call my shot on this one. I think Johnson is an absolute stud despite the fact that he was ranked outside of the top-15 in his recruiting class. He’s one of the most explosive athletes in the country, a 6-foot-5 wing who can get wherever he wants on the court because of how sudden and powerful his movements are. Offensively, he’s a great driver and can finish way above the rim because of that quick-twitch athleticism. He’s also a developing shooter who clearly seems to have made some strides there, and he also plays unselfishly with solid passing ability. Defensively, he plays exceptionally hard and tries to impact the game by switching across the positional spectrum 1 through 3. He has a real desire to be great on defense. He’s the guy in this class that I expect to burst onto the scene and become something of a surprising top half of the lottery type of talent.

6. Evan Mobley | 7-0 center | 19 years old, freshman | USC
Mobley is one of the most interesting big prospects to come across college basketball in a while because of how easy it is to imagine him developing into a modern big while maintaining some real interior talent. He’s long and defends on the interior, plus has good enough feet to where he looks projectable as a perimeter and ball-screen defender. He really wants to be a force on that end, too, contesting everything. Offensively, he has great touch out to the midrange already and is developing his 3-point shot. He can face up and drive with ease and has a handle to get by defenders. He’s still working his way into his frame and developing his overall game. It’s going to take some time with Mobley. But he’s going to be very productive in college this year on both ends of the floor, and the ceiling is immensely high as long as he keeps working to develop all the flashes he has into consistent moments.

7. Ziaire Williams | 6-7 wing | 19 years old, freshman | Stanford
At 6-foot-7 with a 6-foot-11 wingspan, Williams has all the tools you look for in a prototypical two-way wing. He can defend multiple positions because of his athleticism and quickness. He gives a lot of effort on that end and generally is regarded as one of the most mature elite prospects in the class. On offense, he’s a high-flyer who really can get out on the break and finish, but more than that has real skills as a playmaking scorer. He loves to drive and play through contact despite the fact that he’s still extremely skinny. His first step is terrific and allows him to blow by, even if he’s still developing his versatility off the bounce. I’m also a believer in him becoming a consistent shooter because the mechanics are quite good and he can get to them off the pull-up with ease (even if the results weren’t always there in high school). More than anything though, he just doesn’t play like a goofball. He plays hard on both ends, he constantly moves on offense, and he plays unselfishly despite his skill.

8. Terrence Clarke | 6-7 wing | 19 years old, freshman | Kentucky
Clarke is a super slasher on the wing. He has a great first step and can get into the paint at will. He’s known as an above-the-rim finisher who has great lift off of one foot, but he also already has an impressive array of floater/touch shots from within eight feet. Kentucky really empowers guys to take those little midrange floaters, so I’d expect it to be a big part of his arsenal this year. He’s also a really impressive passer for his size. He sees over the defense and finds passing lanes that other guys just don’t.

The problems right now are that he’s an inconsistent shooter from outside of 15 feet, and he sometimes gets way over-aggressive and commits some wild turnovers. Whereas Boston will be the scoring phenom at Kentucky this year, I’d expect Clarke to be something of a problem solver due to the nature of his game. He can do a little bit of offensive initiation, he can defend guys at high levels, and he can go get a bucket when necessary. If the jumper comes, Clarke has real upside beyond even this level in 2021.

9. Scottie Barnes | 6-8 forward | 19 years old, freshman | Florida State
The prototypical “everything but the jumper” skill package. Elite-level potential on defense. He plays with an exceptional motor and has elite measurements at 6-8 with a 7-foot-2 wingspan. One of the very rare prospects who have actual 1 through 5 switchable potential on defense. Genuinely has All-Defensive Team upside at some point already at just 19 years old because of his ability to slide with quicker players. The key will be deriving enough value on offense to stay on the floor.

Generally, I think he can do that because he’s not a total non-factor on that end. He’s a really smart passer and playmaker for others, both from a standstill and on the move. He actually is expected to play some point guard this year at Florida State, although I see him more as a secondary guy at the NBA level. He moves well without the ball, and does a great job of intuitively taking advantage of 4 on 3 situations when he sees open teammates. Ultimately, he needs to show that he can do anything as a shooter at all, otherwise this might be too high for him. Given the importance of defensive versatility, though, I like Barnes to become a good NBA player.

10. Usman Garuba | 6-8 forward/center | 18 years old | Real Madrid
Garuba is this season’s early-career producer in Euroleague. He is a part-time starter for Real Madrid, one of the top teams in the world outside of the NBA. The big thing he brings to the table is defensive versatility. He’s one of the better teenage defensive prospects to emerge out of Europe in recent years. He has quick feet with slides in ball screen coverages, and his 7-foot-2 wingspan and body control on shot contests on the interior allows him to affect a ton of shots.

Offensively, he’s not particularly an explosive leaper and he doesn’t get downhill all that well as a roller, but he has great dexterity with the ball for his age and is a really underrated passer. The big key for him is continuing to develop the 3-point shot. Real Madrid has really allowed him to explore the studio space in ACB play this season, and he’s shooting just 4-for-25 from 3. If he were a better 3-point shooter, I would say that I think he’s a legit top-half of the lottery guy. But until we see that ironed out, he’s more just your baseline lottery big who can move his feet and help you in multiple ways.

11. Jalen Suggs | 6-5 guard | 19 years old, freshman | Gonzaga
Suggs has a shot to be the leading scorer on a Gonzaga team that is currently the favorite to win the national title this season. The 6-foot-5 guard is a tremendous scorer with fluid body control and great touch around the basket. He can also shoot it at a high level from deep. There is also some combo guard to his game as well, as he can make high-level dump-off passes and same-side kickouts after collapsing the defense as a driver. Unfortunately, there is a downside here, though: you’re going to get tired very quickly of hearing how he was a high school quarterback who won Minnesota’s Mr. Football award in addition to its Mr. Basketball award.

12. Caleb Love | 6-3 guard | 19 years old, freshman | North Carolina
Another scoring combo/lead guard here with Love. His handle is extremely tight and he can create plays with or without ball-screens. If a defender goes under a ball-screen with him, he has the ability to easily stop and pop from behind the 3-point line. But if you overplay him, he’ll beat you off the bounce with ease and get into the lane with quickness and tremendous footwork. Everything about his pull-up game is on-point right now for a teenage guard. It would be great for him to keep improving as a distributor and playmaker for others. That’s where his upside lies. But he might have enough talent as a scorer to where he just sticks regardless of the passing ability.

13. Daishen Nix | 6-5 guard | 18 years old | G League Ignite
Nix was one of the best passers and playmakers for others in the 2020 recruiting class, a big lead guard with great vision who constantly finds his teammates in advantageous spots. He’s also an impressive finisher at the rim. Despite not being a particularly explosive athlete, he plays at his own pace, changes speeds, and has absolutely elite footwork to maneuver around defenders in traffic. Loves the Euro step move at the rim to finish. The big question that he’ll need to answer is whether he can consistently separate from opposing players. Having said that though, I think I buy into his jumper from distance keeping defenders off-balance enough to help him get into the paint.

14. Keyontae Johnson | 6-5 wing | 21 years old, junior | Florida
NBA evaluators were surprised when Johnson decided not to enter the 2020 NBA Draft, as many thought he had a chance to turn into a late first-round pick after going through even the truncated process. Again, NBA teams are constantly on the lookout for wings who do two things: defend multiple positions and shoot. At 6-foot-5, 230 pounds, Johnson is a tank who can hit shots from distance, and then guard 1 through 4 at the collegiate level. By the end of SEC play last year, Johnson was one of the five best players in the conference and clearly earned All-SEC honors. Look for more of the same this year, and I’d expect he goes in round one in 2021.

15. Greg Brown | 6-8 forward | 19 years old, freshman | Texas
Brown is one of the more explosive athletes you’ll find in the 2021 class as a leaper. He’s a highlight reel waiting to happen as a dunker, but he is more than that. He has a great face-up game as a driver, and has some chance to shoot it off the catch as he continues to work through his mechanics. Defensively, he does a great job as a 4-man protecting the weak side of the rim. The key with Brown will be to keep working on upping his skill level overall beyond just being a crazy athlete, but he already has enough talent to get him into conversations for the lottery.

16. Moses Moody | 6-6 wing | 18 years old, freshman | Arkansas
This is the third player in my top 16 who played for Montverde Academy last season, along with Cunningham and Barnes. Yeah, there is a good reason they got discussed as potentially the best high school team in history. Moody is the prototypical 3-and-D guy, a high-level shooter from distance with great length who takes on tough wing defensive assignments. He could stand to improve his lateral quickness a bit, but Moody should average up over 15 points per game while hitting between 37 and 41 percent from 3 in Eric Musselman’s wide-open offensive attack.

17. Josh Christopher | 6-4 guard | 19 years old, freshman | Arizona State
Christopher is a three-level scoring guard who has one of the most polished repertoires of any incoming freshman in the country. His footwork is superb, and he can get to his spots with ease. He’s also very competitive and seems to really care about winning. Having said that, he’s probably not a good enough athlete to be a true creator at the NBA level, so his defensive effort needs to become more consistent. There is a role for him as a 3-and-D 2-guard at the next level, but he has to be willing to embrace that.

18. D.J. Steward | 6-3 guard | 19 years old, freshman | Duke
Steward is a fearless, high-scoring freshman out of Chicago who I would expect to lead Duke in scoring this season. He creates shots at will on offense. His pull-up game is pretty polished and sick, with sudden moves allowing him to create feet of separation going backward. He’s improved a lot as a jump shooter over the last year, too, to the point that he should be reliable as a central offensive figure in terms of efficiency. He’s just 6-foot-3, and he’s quite skinny, so he’d be best off putting on some weight and improving a bit as a distributor for others, but Steward’s scoring is so ridiculous that it puts him in the conversation to be a potential top 20 guy.

19. Jalen Johnson | 6-8 forward | 18 years old, freshman | Duke
Johnson is seen as the top recruit coming into Duke this season, and indeed I’d anticipate him having the biggest impact among its freshmen because his game will work well at the college level. He’s hyper-smart and plays with great feel. His best skill is his passing ability, as he’s always under control and keeps his head up to make plays for others. His body control and balance is terrific. The things that worry me here, though, are that Johnson is not a particularly high-level athlete, and while he has a reputation of being a good shooter, I don’t really love the mechanics because it’s a straight line drive jumper with a hitch. Still, he’s a smart player trending toward being a first-round pick.

20. James Bouknight | 6-5 wing | 20 years old, sophomore | Connecticut
Was one of the most impactful scoring freshmen in college basketball by the time late January rolled around in 2020. In his final 13 games, Bouknight averaged 17.2 points while shooting 45 percent from the field and 36 percent from 3. He’s an elite-level athlete in terms of leaping ability, and he has a real knowledge of how to get separation from defenders. He’s a live wire highlight waiting to happen in transition, plus has already proven he can knock down 3s. Hop aboard the Bouknight Bandwagon, because the train is leaving the station quickly.

21. Josh Giddey | 6-7 wing | 18 years old | Adelaide
Giddey has shot up the board for NBA teams over the last year and is considered a potential first-round pick as a Next Star in Australia. He’s 6-foot-7 and extremely skinny still, but his feel for the game is superb and he makes an impact across the board because he just knows how to play the game. He’s the youngest player to debut for the Australian national team since Ben Simmons. His passing ability — which is genuinely very high-level for his size — has seen him fashioned as something of a lead guard at youth levels in Australia, but I see him as more of a secondary playmaking wing long-term. He doesn’t quite have the necessary game off the bounce yet to create plays. Maybe it’ll come, but the good news is that Giddey should profile into that secondary playmaking role nicely because of his burgeoning shooting ability.

22. Chris Smith | 6-9 wing | 20 years old, senior | UCLA
Smith was very close to entering the 2020 NBA Draft, but returned to UCLA. He finally is starting to realize his immense potential, having morphed into an interesting shot-maker and defensive wing at his size. He can handle the ball comfortably at 6-foot-9, and his jump shot off the catch is real. The idea here is that he has the upside of someone like a Trevor Ariza as a big wing with some shooting and enough game off the bounce to keep defenses honest, while also playing solid defense himself. This will probably be the highest you’ll see Smith on a draft board, but I’m a believer in him being a high-level character kid who will continue to improve now that his confidence is right.

23. David Johnson | 6-5 guard | 20 years old, sophomore | Louisville
Johnson was one of my favorite prospects to emerge over the course of the 2019-20 season, as he made an immediate impact upon getting healthy for Louisville as a freshman. At 6-foot-5, he’s a high-level playmaker as a passer, making every live-dribble read that you can find in the book. He’s also a high-level defensive player who can swallow up opposing lead guards with his length. The critical input here will be the jump shot, as it’s still a bit too inconsistent at this stage. He spent the offseason repping out jumpers though, so we’ll see how it looks once he gets back. If Johnson is a threat as a jump shooter, I expect he’ll be one of the breakouts of the college hoops season and a first-round pick.

24. Roko Prkacin | 6-9 forward/center | 18 years old | Cibona
Prkacin is a weird big prospect in that he’s something of a multi-skilled and polished big man for his age, but doesn’t appear to have a particularly high ceiling despite his obvious talent. On the plus side, he clearly has a great feel for the game and a very polished skillset that allowed him to be productive even at Adriatic League level before turning 18. He has great dexterity with the ball, making plays as a passer and driver. Defensively, he wants to make an impact. The problem is that he’s a heavy-footed 6-foot-9 forward who may struggle a bit to defend in space at the NBA level. He’s also working through his jumper at this stage, a skill that will be essential to his NBA success. He’s too productive at too high of a level not to have here as a late first-, early second-rounder. I just wonder how it keeps translating as he moves up levels as a big.

25. Aaron Henry | 6-5 wing | 21 years old, junior | Michigan State
I’ve been a fan of Henry for a few years now, as he has a game that should translate nicely to the pros as soon as he starts to become more consistent with his performances. That started to come late in the season for Michigan State, as he became a more confident driver and attack-oriented player, averaging 12 points, six rebounds and three assists over his last eight games. Had the season not been suspended, he might be in the NBA right now. He’ll move into a more primary role this year for the Spartans, and I’d expect that as long as the jumper continues to be consistent, he’ll get a guaranteed deal in the NBA in 2021.

26. Ayo Dosunmu | 6-5 guard | 21 years old, junior | Illinois
Expected to leave school throughout the majority of his sophomore season, Dosunmu decided to return after leading Illinois to a terrific season that had it poised to make an NCAA Tournament run. Now, Illinois is (or at least should be) considered the favorite to win the Big Ten with a loaded roster returning. Dosunmu was arguably the most clutch player in college hoops last season, and while the 3-point number may point to regression, he actually got more comfortable as a shooter last year from the midrange area. The keys for Dosunmu are extending that range beyond the 3-point line, and continuing to refine his halfcourt game offensively. He’s considered an elite character kid, so evaluators want to buy into him. He just needs to keep improving the jumper and not stagnate. He’s one of my favorites for first-team All-America this year.

27. Corey Kispert | 6-7 wing | 22 years old, senior | Gonzaga
Had Kispert decided to turn pro after his junior season, he would have certainly gotten a guaranteed deal from an NBA team. In the end, he decided he wanted a final collegiate shot at the immortality of being the leader of Gonzaga’s first national champion. The translation for him to the NBA is pretty simple. He’s an elite-level shooter. He averaged 14 points per game while shooting 44 percent from 3 last season. His mechanics on the jump shot are absolutely pristine. I think he’s one of the safest bets of any returning player in college hoops to be a top-45 pick in this class.

28. Moussa Cisse | 6-10 center | 18 years old, freshman | Memphis
Cisse is just an absolutely ridiculous shot-blocker. Has a chance to be among the nation’s leaders this season, as he contests and affects nearly everything around the rim while maintaining his athleticism away from the hoop defensively. He has to figure out what to do on offense because right now he doesn’t process the game quick enough to be anything other than a catch-and-finish guy at the rim. He needs to be able to not get flustered and turn the ball over. But with a 7-foot-4 wingspan, he has the tools NBA teams look for in a prospect.

29. Jared Butler | 6-3 guard | 20 years old, junior | Baylor
I want to have Butler higher, but there wasn’t quite as much enthusiasm for him as I’d have hoped as he went through the pre-draft process this year before returning to Baylor. He didn’t get any assurances that he would be a guaranteed pick. So I have Butler at No. 29, as I think he’s going to have an absolutely monster season as a scorer. He has one of the most technically sound handles of any prospect I’ve seen, with the ability to get defenders off-balance with ease. He knocks down shots off the catch and off the bounce as a combo guard. I think he sticks as a bench guard in the NBA.

30. Terrence Shannon Jr. | 6-5 wing | 20 years old, sophomore | Texas Tech
Last season, word out of Texas Tech practices was that evaluators were more excited about the long-term potential of Shannon as opposed to that of one-and-done freshman Jahmi’us Ramsey. The latter had the All-Big 12 year, but I’d bet that those premonitions about Shannon end up getting proven right this draft cycle. He really struggled to shoot it as a freshman. However, he has all of the athletic tools that evaluators look for from the NBA wing position. He’s a lefty with high-flying leaping ability, great quick-twitch lateral athleticism, and the skills for dribbling, passing, shooting and defending.

31. Franz Wagner | 6-10 forward | 19 years old, sophomore | Michigan

32. Jeremiah Robinson-Earl | 6-10 forward | 20 years old, sophomore | Villanova

33. Isaiah Jackson | 6-10 center | 18 years old, freshman | Kentucky

34. Oscar Tshiebwe | 6-9 center | 20 years old, sophomore | West Virginia

35. Scottie Lewis | 6-5 wing | 20 years old, sophomore | Florida

36. Trendon Watford | 6-9 forward | 20 years old, sophomore | LSU

37. Marcus Garrett | 6-5 guard | 22 years old, senior | Kansas

38. Jaden Springer | 6-4 guard | 19 years old, freshman | Tennessee

39. Romeo Weems | 6-7 wing/forward | 20 years old, sophomore | DePaul

40. Trayce Jackson-Davis | 6-9 center | 20 years old, sophomore | Indiana

41. Matt Mitchell | 6-6 wing | 22 years old, senior | San Diego State

42. Carlos Alocen | 6-4 guard | 19 years old | Real Madrid

43. Marcus Zegarowski | 6-0 guard | 21 years old, junior | Creighton

44. Wendell Moore | 6-5 wing | 19 years old, sophomore | Duke

45. Cam Thomas | 6-3 guard | 18 years old, freshman | LSU

46. Miles McBride | 6-2 guard | 20 years old, sophomore | West Virginia

47. Yves Pons | 6-7 forward | 21 years old, senior | Tennessee

48. Matthew Hurt | 6-9 guard | 20 years old, sophomore | Duke

49. John Petty | 6-5 wing | 21 years old, senior | Alabama

50. Luka Garza | 6-11 center | 22 years old, junior | Iowa

51. Joe Wieskamp | 6-7 wing | 21 years old, junior | Iowa

52. Isaiah Todd | 6-9 forward | 19 years old | G League Ignite

53. Ibou Badji | 7-0 center | 18 years old | Barcelona

54. Aamir Simms | 6-8 forward | 22 years old, senior | Clemson

55. Chris Duarte | 6-5 guard | 22 years old, senior | Oregon

56. Samuell Williamson | 6-7 wing | 20 years old, sophomore | Louisville

57. AJ Lawson | 6-6 guard | 21 years old, junior | South Carolina

58. Joel Ayayi | 6-5 guard | 20 years old, junior | Gonzaga

59. Neemias Queta | 7-0 center | 21 years old, junior | Utah State

60. Derrick Alston Jr. | 6-9 wing | 22 years old, senior | Boise State


Lol! That it is man. :wink:
But I'm going to perhaps shock a few people here and hold off on the draft speculation ( in majority) until we near the end of the season, And see how our depth benefits us. I will pose the question to you though man. Where would you GUESTIMATE us finishing ( draft range) if everything plays out best outcome for us? My guess will be in the 18- 24 range.

Also, If prioritizing a long term guard prospect outside of the lottery, Do you have any specific favorites in that range if the mid to late lottery? Nembhard? Nix? Roach? Or perhaps even Giddy? ( Intriguing size at 6'8) solid IQ, solid passer? I'm really intrigued to see how things play out, But will also be looking to see which positions ( guard/ wing/ center) will require long term consideration the most. :D


I don't know these prospects at all, and of course anyone that is a freshman only has HS and mix tape stuff, which is mostly useless.

If anything, I will see what happens during the college season. I think it will be good to post #s and highlights throughout the season when prospects play their college, games, so we can see how they do against solid competition. It makes it easier to catch up than reading and in depth post and watching long videos of prospects at the end (which people can do too, but it's more of an overload).

Unfortunately, there could be a lot of college games canceled. It's good the conference play doesn't start until January, so hopefully things can be more under control with COVID by then, though it is the height of flu season. If I were them, I'd think about pushing conference play back to start in March and have May Madness....of course that normally would conflict with the NBA season but their playoffs will probably start near the end of May or something like that.

As far as where we finish, who knows? It really all depends on Paul's health. On paper our team looks great. I remember in the summer of 2004 Bill Simmons got access to a Suns scrimmage or practice and surprisingly picked them as like a 6 seed...keep in mind they were a bottom team in 03-04...he just said it gelled perfectly. I cannot remember the expectations that season overall from NBA pundits, but it obviously wasn't the #1 seed, and I don't even think it was any higher than Simmons' projection, because I remember enjoying seeing that.

No one knew much about D'Antoni then, we hadn't seen Nash who was good in Dallas but didn't put up eye popping stats...Joe Johnson was decent the year before but not great, and Q was not a huge flashy signing..Amare was in his 3rd year.

So the way I look at it, anything could happen. I've watched the Suns go from like 28 to 55 wins with KJ in his first full season and then like 29 to 62 in Nash's full season. Nash ended up having the better roster and system, and they were both tough playoff teams for years.

In ways this kind of reminds me of those two times. We added PGs and other pieces. Paul won't be as dynamic as either of those guys, bu has the experience and bbiq superior to what they had at those times.

If healthy, nothing would really surprise me...a 1 seed or a 7 seed, and if healthy the whole season, I think top 5 if the chemistry with him and others works out. I think a lot rests on Ayton too...we have so much depth everywhere else, how much more he develops is key. If he gets hurt, we are pretty thin, and Saric would probably have to start at the 5, which could be ok, but teams like the Lakers and other big teams would hurt us badly I think...we will probably have a tough time with them anyway especially with their depth improvement.

If CP3 misses 15-20 games, I wouldn't be surprised if we didn't make the playoffs, because we don't have enough of a steady PG behind him...it's too thin. I do think we have a few guys that can co-exist in the backcourt well with Booker, like Galloway and Moore, and to a lesser extent Carter...jury still out for me on what Payne will look like.

The West is deep and tough..so injuries to any team will be a big determining factor. We can withstand some, but to any of (in this order) CP3, Ayton, Booker or Bridges, will really hurt. Dallas is deep too, but they are missing KP...however with Doncic as the MVP favorite right now, likely only to get even better than last season, and the superstars on the other LA teams and Jokic/Murray leading Denver, all those teams will be very tough.

I am a little confused at why everyone is SO high on Portland. I do understand that with Nurkic AND Covington that makes them really tough, and I do like Hood, but maybe I'm missing another signing, because I am unsure of their depth and other starter.

Then people may be sleeping a bit on Utah. They did have a 3-1 lead on Denver, who knocked out the Clippers...and Mitchell was dropping 50..and I think Bojan was out for awhile.

I do expect us to be better than Utah but none are pushovers.

Then Memphis..Ja will only get better, as will JJJ and Clarke, and I think they had good draft additions and seem pretty deep.

If Zion is healthy who knows about the Pelicans? They did lose Jrue though, and Bledsoe is a big downgrade, but they do have Ball and now Kira Lewis, Jr too so they have depth, and shooting with Redick and then Ingram. I don't expect them to be as tough as Memphis though.

I think in all likelihood we could be around 4 with health behind the LA teams and Denver. It could depend on how often the Clips rest Kawhi and PG13 too. Dallas could compete with us, as I like the J-Rich signing...they do lose some shooting with Curry gone though. Might depend on how long KP is out.

I think the West could really finish all sorts of ways, but the Lakers will likely be the 1 seed....LeBron is on a mission and him with AD are just hard to stop. I thought the Clips were a tad better this year but it seems like the Lakers have more depth now...and of course the Clips choked to Denver in the playoffs....I don't view that as likely. Even if PG13 may have that rep, Kawhi is one of the only players in the NBA who is consistently much better in the playoffs..I doubt he lets that happen again. If they get the 2 or 3 seed, I expect a battle between the LA teams in the WCF. But it would be fun to meet one of them in the 2nd round to see how we do...and you never know.
Walt_Uoob
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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#6 » by Walt_Uoob » Wed Nov 25, 2020 8:10 pm

This is an absolutely ridiculous post but my mind went down a daydream rabbit hole that I guess I'll share:

After observing these last two off-seasons I think Jones is legitimately likely to trade Ayton unless his new more serious teammates rub off on him in a big way. So here's a wild but believable scenario: The Kings miss the playoffs and win the lottery, and Cade Cunningham is considered the no-brainer top pick, so after the lottery they're on the clock with Cunningham as the obvious pick but are in a bit of a pickle because they already have Fox and Haliburton as PGs. Meanwhile, Ayton has a really good season but doesn't knock Jones's socks off with his work ethic, while Jalen Smith works his butt off and shows he can be a starting-caliber NBA big.

I see the makings of a trade there. Fox is the most accomplished of the three Kings PGs, but the worst shooter, so I'm not sure he's Jones's type. Haliburton is a great fit for the Suns on paper, though obviously Jones preferred Smith, but maybe after a solid rookie year Jones warms up to him more (he did mention in an interview that the staff fell in love with a bunch of guys in this draft). So maybe Ayton for Fox, or Ayton for Haliburton + Bjelica, or Ayton + something for Cunningham.
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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#7 » by WeekapaugGroove » Wed Nov 25, 2020 8:55 pm

bwgood77 wrote:
Ghost of Kleine wrote:
bwgood77 wrote:It definitely seems early, but guess what? This is the latest in the year we have EVER started the draft thread, but college basketball is starting this week.

With likely no pick in 2022, this will be our last draft...it's good we finally won't have to be focusing on the top 10 prospects (hopefully).

It's GoK time!

Cade Cunningham must be pretty good. http://www.tankathon.com/big_board

Some prospect info

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Lol! That it is man. :wink:
But I'm going to perhaps shock a few people here and hold off on the draft speculation ( in majority) until we near the end of the season, And see how our depth benefits us. I will pose the question to you though man. Where would you GUESTIMATE us finishing ( draft range) if everything plays out best outcome for us? My guess will be in the 18- 24 range.

Also, If prioritizing a long term guard prospect outside of the lottery, Do you have any specific favorites in that range if the mid to late lottery? Nembhard? Nix? Roach? Or perhaps even Giddy? ( Intriguing size at 6'8) solid IQ, solid passer? I'm really intrigued to see how things play out, But will also be looking to see which positions ( guard/ wing/ center) will require long term consideration the most. :D


I don't know these prospects at all, and of course anyone that is a freshman only has HS and mix tape stuff, which is mostly useless.

If anything, I will see what happens during the college season. I think it will be good to post #s and highlights throughout the season when prospects play their college, games, so we can see how they do against solid competition. It makes it easier to catch up than reading and in depth post and watching long videos of prospects at the end (which people can do too, but it's more of an overload).

Unfortunately, there could be a lot of college games canceled. It's good the conference play doesn't start until January, so hopefully things can be more under control with COVID by then, though it is the height of flu season. If I were them, I'd think about pushing conference play back to start in March and have May Madness....of course that normally would conflict with the NBA season but their playoffs will probably start near the end of May or something like that.

As far as where we finish, who knows? It really all depends on Paul's health. On paper our team looks great. I remember in the summer of 2004 Bill Simmons got access to a Suns scrimmage or practice and surprisingly picked them as like a 6 seed...keep in mind they were a bottom team in 03-04...he just said it gelled perfectly. I cannot remember the expectations that season overall from NBA pundits, but it obviously wasn't the #1 seed, and I don't even think it was any higher than Simmons' projection, because I remember enjoying seeing that.

No one knew much about D'Antoni then, we hadn't seen Nash who was good in Dallas but didn't put up eye popping stats...Joe Johnson was decent the year before but not great, and Q was not a huge flashy signing..Amare was in his 3rd year.

So the way I look at it, anything could happen. I've watched the Suns go from like 28 to 55 wins with KJ in his first full season and then like 29 to 62 in Nash's full season. Nash ended up having the better roster and system, and they were both tough playoff teams for years.

In ways this kind of reminds me of those two times. We added PGs and other pieces. Paul won't be as dynamic as either of those guys, bu has the experience and bbiq superior to what they had at those times.

If healthy, nothing would really surprise me...a 1 seed or a 7 seed, and if healthy the whole season, I think top 5 if the chemistry with him and others works out. I think a lot rests on Ayton too...we have so much depth everywhere else, how much more he develops is key. If he gets hurt, we are pretty thin, and Saric would probably have to start at the 5, which could be ok, but teams like the Lakers and other big teams would hurt us badly I think...we will probably have a tough time with them anyway especially with their depth improvement.

If CP3 misses 15-20 games, I wouldn't be surprised if we didn't make the playoffs, because we don't have enough of a steady PG behind him...it's too thin. I do think we have a few guys that can co-exist in the backcourt well with Booker, like Galloway and Moore, and to a lesser extent Carter...jury still out for me on what Payne will look like.

The West is deep and tough..so injuries to any team will be a big determining factor. We can withstand some, but to any of (in this order) CP3, Ayton, Booker or Bridges, will really hurt. Dallas is deep too, but they are missing KP...however with Doncic as the MVP favorite right now, likely only to get even better than last season, and the superstars on the other LA teams and Jokic/Murray leading Denver, all those teams will be very tough.

I am a little confused at why everyone is SO high on Portland. I do understand that with Nurkic AND Covington that makes them really tough, and I do like Hood, but maybe I'm missing another signing, because I am unsure of their depth and other starter.

Then people may be sleeping a bit on Utah. They did have a 3-1 lead on Denver, who knocked out the Clippers...and Mitchell was dropping 50..and I think Bojan was out for awhile.

I do expect us to be better than Utah but none are pushovers.

Then Memphis..Ja will only get better, as will JJJ and Clarke, and I think they had good draft additions and seem pretty deep.

If Zion is healthy who knows about the Pelicans? They did lose Jrue though, and Bledsoe is a big downgrade, but they do have Ball and now Kira Lewis, Jr too so they have depth, and shooting with Redick and then Ingram. I don't expect them to be as tough as Memphis though.

I think in all likelihood we could be around 4 with health behind the LA teams and Denver. It could depend on how often the Clips rest Kawhi and PG13 too. Dallas could compete with us, as I like the J-Rich signing...they do lose some shooting with Curry gone though. Might depend on how long KP is out.

I think the West could really finish all sorts of ways, but the Lakers will likely be the 1 seed....LeBron is on a mission and him with AD are just hard to stop. I thought the Clips were a tad better this year but it seems like the Lakers have more depth now...and of course the Clips choked to Denver in the playoffs....I don't view that as likely. Even if PG13 may have that rep, Kawhi is one of the only players in the NBA who is consistently much better in the playoffs..I doubt he lets that happen again. If they get the 2 or 3 seed, I expect a battle between the LA teams in the WCF. But it would be fun to meet one of them in the 2nd round to see how we do...and you never know.
Also have to factor in we're still in a pandemic and it's very possible a team or two have their season super **** over by Covid. Hopefully not the Suns.

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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#8 » by bwgood77 » Thu Nov 26, 2020 3:14 am

WeekapaugGroove wrote:People who know more about this stuff than me all seem to LOVE this draft class.


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Yes, this was the intro to an article by Vecenie in The Athletic:

The 2021 NBA Draft process begins in earnest this week as college basketball teams tip off games and scouts look on knowing that the 2021 class looks, throughout the lottery, to have much more upside than the 2020 one did. And indeed, this is a draft worth tanking for. I’d ballpark it at five players who are currently tracking ahead of anyone in the 2020 NBA Draft and thus would have been likely to be selected at No. 1 in that class. And realistically, there are even more players than those who are particularly interesting and seem to have higher upsides.

But more importantly, this draft is absolutely loaded with wings. NBA teams are constantly on the lookout for players who can morph into athletic, multi-positional and multi-role two-way wings, and this draft has more of them than any that I can remember scouting in the last seven years. After a draft where bigs ended up being selected in 12 of the top 35 picks, I’d expect much more of a reversion next year toward the way the NBA game actually looks in reality now, where versatile wings are the most important thing that you can find. In an era where defensive versatility and athleticism are prized by NBA coaches, this is the draft that will provide a significant influx of flexible, lineup-altering players who will allow teams to play skilled and switchable without losing a ton of size.

I just want to note one final thing: Many around the league and those with public-facing jobs have called this one of the deepest drafts in recent memory. Through the lottery, I generally agree that this draft projects as strong. Because of that strength at the top, this projects to be a much, much stronger draft overall.


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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#9 » by DirtyDez » Sun Nov 29, 2020 3:27 am

bwgood77 wrote:
WeekapaugGroove wrote:People who know more about this stuff than me all seem to LOVE this draft class.


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Yes, this was the intro to an article by Vecenie in The Athletic:

The 2021 NBA Draft process begins in earnest this week as college basketball teams tip off games and scouts look on knowing that the 2021 class looks, throughout the lottery, to have much more upside than the 2020 one did. And indeed, this is a draft worth tanking for. I’d ballpark it at five players who are currently tracking ahead of anyone in the 2020 NBA Draft and thus would have been likely to be selected at No. 1 in that class. And realistically, there are even more players than those who are particularly interesting and seem to have higher upsides.

But more importantly, this draft is absolutely loaded with wings. NBA teams are constantly on the lookout for players who can morph into athletic, multi-positional and multi-role two-way wings, and this draft has more of them than any that I can remember scouting in the last seven years. After a draft where bigs ended up being selected in 12 of the top 35 picks, I’d expect much more of a reversion next year toward the way the NBA game actually looks in reality now, where versatile wings are the most important thing that you can find. In an era where defensive versatility and athleticism are prized by NBA coaches, this is the draft that will provide a significant influx of flexible, lineup-altering players who will allow teams to play skilled and switchable without losing a ton of size.

I just want to note one final thing: Many around the league and those with public-facing jobs have called this one of the deepest drafts in recent memory. Through the lottery, I generally agree that this draft projects as strong. Because of that strength at the top, this projects to be a much, much stronger draft overall.


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fromthetop321 wrote:I got Lebron number 1, he is also leading defensive player of the year. Curry's game still reminds me of Jeremy Lin to much.
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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#10 » by bwgood77 » Sun Nov 29, 2020 3:34 am

DirtyDez wrote:
bwgood77 wrote:
WeekapaugGroove wrote:People who know more about this stuff than me all seem to LOVE this draft class.


Sent from my SM-G986U using RealGM mobile app


Yes, this was the intro to an article by Vecenie in The Athletic:

The 2021 NBA Draft process begins in earnest this week as college basketball teams tip off games and scouts look on knowing that the 2021 class looks, throughout the lottery, to have much more upside than the 2020 one did. And indeed, this is a draft worth tanking for. I’d ballpark it at five players who are currently tracking ahead of anyone in the 2020 NBA Draft and thus would have been likely to be selected at No. 1 in that class. And realistically, there are even more players than those who are particularly interesting and seem to have higher upsides.

But more importantly, this draft is absolutely loaded with wings. NBA teams are constantly on the lookout for players who can morph into athletic, multi-positional and multi-role two-way wings, and this draft has more of them than any that I can remember scouting in the last seven years. After a draft where bigs ended up being selected in 12 of the top 35 picks, I’d expect much more of a reversion next year toward the way the NBA game actually looks in reality now, where versatile wings are the most important thing that you can find. In an era where defensive versatility and athleticism are prized by NBA coaches, this is the draft that will provide a significant influx of flexible, lineup-altering players who will allow teams to play skilled and switchable without losing a ton of size.

I just want to note one final thing: Many around the league and those with public-facing jobs have called this one of the deepest drafts in recent memory. Through the lottery, I generally agree that this draft projects as strong. Because of that strength at the top, this projects to be a much, much stronger draft overall.


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What’s his lottery look like?


It's in the OP.
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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#11 » by bwgood77 » Sun Nov 29, 2020 7:47 am

Jalen Johnson, #19 on that list, had 19 points on 8-8 shooting including a 3 and a couple free throws, 19 rebounds, 5 assists and 4 blocks tonight.

That's crazy for your first college game.

https://www.espn.com/mens-college-basketball/boxscore?gameId=401259835

Also Baylor won big, as Jared Butler, #29 on the list had a good game with 17, 4, 3, 3 and 1 with a few 3s. They also have a D. Mitchell and M. Teague with arguably better #s.

https://www.espn.com/mens-college-basketball/boxscore?gameId=401265777
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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#12 » by Djedefre » Sun Nov 29, 2020 1:40 pm

Not overly impressed by the top prospects we've seen so far. Many games got cancelled&postponed so we didn't have the chance to see Tennessee's duo, Scottie or Ziaire tho. Cade was okayish, but, paradoxically, Suggs showed much better passing and court vision in his first 2 games. Cunningham wasn't bad or anything, but really nothing special so far.
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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#13 » by bwgood77 » Sun Nov 29, 2020 8:48 pm

Suggs seems like he'd be a great guy for the Suns to end up with. Unfortunately they probably won't have a shot at him if they get to the playoffs. However, maybe with the depth in the class and not many teams needing PGs, he falls. Maybe the Knicks get Cunningham if they can ever get lucky in the lottery, though maybe he isn't the #1 pick if he is not as good as he is hyped up to be.
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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#14 » by darealjuice » Mon Nov 30, 2020 4:47 am

My only concern with Cunningham so far is that he hasn't looked like a particularly explosive athlete. He's definitely skilled and fluid, but he will need to get stronger to play with his physicality in the NBA.

Suggs really impressed me in his debut against Kansas. I'll be interested to see how his outside shooting holds up throughout the season, but the athleticism and skill set are there. Jalen Johnson definitely has me curious after his first game too. He doesn't look like he's quite the athlete, playmaker, and ball handler that Ben Simmons is, but still an interesting skill set. Shooting will be key for both of them though.
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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#15 » by darealjuice » Tue Dec 1, 2020 4:01 am

Zaire Williams has been impressive tonight
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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#16 » by darealjuice » Thu Dec 3, 2020 12:46 am

Boy that Jalen Suggs injury did not look good
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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#17 » by bwgood77 » Thu Dec 3, 2020 1:39 am

darealjuice wrote:Boy that Jalen Suggs injury did not look good


Oh man he got injured? That sucks. Maybe he falls to us in the draft.
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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#18 » by Ghost of Kleine » Fri Dec 4, 2020 3:47 pm

Just wanted to say that IF this guy somehow falls to the mid to late first round, I'd really love to consider him for a backup center role to Ayton! :nod:
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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#19 » by Ghost of Kleine » Thu Dec 17, 2020 7:09 pm

Again, To reiterate. This is the prospect in the 2021 draft that I really want to help address our frontcourt defensive issues/ needs as our backup 4/5. ( backup 5 mainly). Also would be a tremendous defensive anchor, Should we decide to package Ayton in a trade for another star player IF IT COMES TO THAT???

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Re: 2021 Draft and College Basketball 

Post#20 » by Ghost of Kleine » Wed Dec 23, 2020 3:52 pm

This is a pretty solid stat line. And this kid might be somebody to keep an eye on as a potential late first/ early 2nd round prospect for our backup center needs.
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