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The Troy Brown Thread

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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#621 » by prime1time » Sun Nov 8, 2020 8:58 am

Ruzious wrote:
dckingsfan wrote:
payitforward wrote:Wow, dckingsfan -- did you bring back that table of data from a recent visit to the future?!?! :)

We played 72 games. Brown's 1782 minutes translate into 2030 minutes in a normal 82-game season.

He had a terrific year all in all, so I can't see any reason why his minutes would -- or should -- go down next season. Especially since, in the nature of things, you'd expect him to continue to improve: he played this season at the age of 20 !!

Yes, :meditate: things just came to me and the future appeared :lol:

I think his minutes go down because he plays behind Beal. This is my clairvoyant prediction... and you know who our coach is... I think we grab another wing in the draft who also slices into his minutes. And I think Bonga plays well and slices into his minutes.

Nevertheless (I feel like Maxwell Smart on this one asking for the cone of silence) he still plays much better.

TBJ at 21 is probably likely to add some weight and muscle to his 6'7 frame. I think of him more as a 3 than a guard. It's probably more important how they use him rather than what position he plays. With Beal and Wall (not to mention Napier/Ish), I don't buy the talk that they'll use him at the point. He almost has to play off the ball in half court offense and get more comfortable trying to be a catch and shoot player - and he's gotta buy into that to make it happen. He's excellent in transition basketball at the 3, and I hope to see him leading the break more. TBJ, embrace the opportunity to start with Wall and Beal - good things will happen if you do.

From what I heard from Sheppard the idea seems to be that they are moving away from the traditional “pg” role and are going to democratize the offense. Of the 3 wings we’ve drafted - Oubre, Porter and Brown - I’m highest on Brown.
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#622 » by prime1time » Sun Nov 8, 2020 9:01 am

dckingsfan wrote:
Ruzious wrote:
dckingsfan wrote:Yes, :meditate: things just came to me and the future appeared :lol:

I think his minutes go down because he plays behind Beal. This is my clairvoyant prediction... and you know who our coach is... I think we grab another wing in the draft who also slices into his minutes. And I think Bonga plays well and slices into his minutes.

Nevertheless (I feel like Maxwell Smart on this one asking for the cone of silence) he still plays much better.

TBJ at 21 is probably likely to add some weight and muscle to his 6'7 frame. I think of him more as a 3 than a guard. It's probably more important how they use him rather than what position he plays. With Beal and Wall (not to mention Napier/Ish), I don't buy the talk that they'll use him at the point. He almost has to play off the ball in half court offense and get more comfortable trying to be a catch and shoot player - and he's gotta buy into that to make it happen. He's excellent in transition basketball at the 3, and I hope to see him leading the break more. TBJ, embrace the opportunity to start with Wall and Beal - good things will happen if you do.

I agree, it is a bit of a problem because he is really an on the ball player now. But that doesn't mean he can't learn that skillset and then he has both.

But not exactly a "perfect" fit with Wall/Beal/Ish as it stands now.

What do you mean by not being a perfect fit? Also Ish Smith is an interloper. Imo the challenge is the way. Brown is developing his game around Wall and Beal. So even though right now things aren’t ideal, I can see Brown Jr. being a great compliment to those two in 2 or 3 years. Maybe I’m too optimistic but I can see Troy developing into a really good player. His head is on straight and he’s locked in.
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#623 » by prime1time » Sun Nov 8, 2020 9:02 am

Read on Twitter
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#624 » by nate33 » Sun Nov 8, 2020 1:51 pm

Am I imagining things, or does he look a bit leaner in this video? TBJ was never one of those super-lean sub-5% body fat guys. He wasn't heavy by any stretch, but you didn't see a lot of muscle definition either. His arms and legs look a bit thinner here. I wonder if he's trying to get quicker and lighter in an effort to be more of a full time guard.

This could be his breakout year. Lots of players really make the jump in their third season. Porter and Oubre did. It would be awesome if he became a legit starting-caliber player, even if he continues to come off the bench as a 3rd guard. Depth is a good thing.

For all our talk about the draft, the likelihood is that the team will be helped the most by improvements from Brown, Bonga and Hachimura.
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#625 » by dckingsfan » Sun Nov 8, 2020 2:05 pm

prime1time wrote:
dckingsfan wrote:
Ruzious wrote:TBJ at 21 is probably likely to add some weight and muscle to his 6'7 frame. I think of him more as a 3 than a guard. It's probably more important how they use him rather than what position he plays. With Beal and Wall (not to mention Napier/Ish), I don't buy the talk that they'll use him at the point. He almost has to play off the ball in half court offense and get more comfortable trying to be a catch and shoot player - and he's gotta buy into that to make it happen. He's excellent in transition basketball at the 3, and I hope to see him leading the break more. TBJ, embrace the opportunity to start with Wall and Beal - good things will happen if you do.

I agree, it is a bit of a problem because he is really an on the ball player now. But that doesn't mean he can't learn that skillset and then he has both.

But not exactly a "perfect" fit with Wall/Beal/Ish as it stands now.

What do you mean by not being a perfect fit? Also Ish Smith is an interloper. Imo the challenge is the way. Brown is developing his game around Wall and Beal. So even though right now things aren’t ideal, I can see Brown Jr. being a great compliment to those two in 2 or 3 years. Maybe I’m too optimistic but I can see Troy developing into a really good player. His head is on straight and he’s locked in.

Well, he has been most effective when he is "on the ball". Not a "perfect fit" with Wall/Beal. To this point he hasn't been a great 3 point shooter. Not a great fit with Wall/Beal (I LIKE the tweet above, his 3 point looks much more effortless). He hasn't been a great defender especially at the guard spot ((I LIKE the tweet above, he looks leaner). Lastly, he really isn't a SF (just a bit undersized) even if rebounds like a PF.

That was my point - weak as it is... :D
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#626 » by doclinkin » Sun Nov 8, 2020 2:31 pm

nate33 wrote:Am I imagining things, or does he look a bit leaner in this video? TBJ was never one of those super-lean sub-5% body fat guys. He wasn't heavy by any stretch, but you didn't see a lot of muscle definition either. His arms and legs look a bit thinner here. I wonder if he's trying to get quicker and lighter in an effort to be more of a full time guard.

This could be his breakout year. Lots of players really make the jump in their third season. Porter and Oubre did. It would be awesome if he became a legit starting-caliber player, even if he continues to come off the bench as a 3rd guard. Depth is a good thing.

For all our talk about the draft, the likelihood is that the team will be helped the most by improvements from Brown, Bonga and Hachimura.


TBJ has been working non-stop year round. I sift the interwebs for video and tidbits about the Wiz and TBJ shows up all the time working out. He and Bryant are consistent in that. Brown said Ian Mahinmi was instrumental in teaching him the importance of staying in shape and being a year round professional in and out of the locker room. Interesting, I think it was in that same article which was translated from french and I now can't find, he said he is working on two key things this offseason: stretching his range and working on his lateral footspeed to better defend on the perimeter. A byproduct of working on your quicks and cardio and shiftiness is bound to be a bit of slimming up. This video is nice to see, but really seeing him getting in run against other players has been even better. He actually works on his defense even in pick up games and his handle even looks tighter in traffic. If he can play as a back-up guard subbing in for either Beal or Wall, that won't hurt. Best if he is switchable 1-3. We will see if hard work and smarts can overcome 2nd tier athleticism. But the hard work part is there.

Looking for good things from TBJ and Bryant both. Hachi I cannot find much about til just now. He's been in japan I suppose, maybe? Harder to search with kanji than key words for me. I'll post the video.
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#627 » by Ruzious » Sun Nov 8, 2020 10:10 pm

prime1time wrote:
Read on Twitter
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I think he feels more comfortable shooting off the dribble. And I'm sure he's diligently working on catching and shooting 3's - which he's going to have to do if he's playing with both Wall and Beal.
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#628 » by prime1time » Mon Nov 9, 2020 5:17 am

Ruzious wrote:
prime1time wrote:
Read on Twitter
?s=21

I think he feels more comfortable shooting off the dribble. And I'm sure he's diligently working on catching and shooting 3's - which he's going to have to do if he's playing with both Wall and Beal.

I agree. But I also think that he can grow into the other role. Sheppard has repeatedly said that he wants an offense where multiple guys are equipped to serve as the pg.
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#629 » by prime1time » Tue Nov 10, 2020 4:53 am

https://www.basketballnews.com/stories/nba-troy-brown-jr-washington-wizards-bubble-dc-make-jump-john-wall-bradley-beal-2020-2021-season

Essay from Troy Brown Jr.
When I entered the NBA, I was an 18-year-old kid from Las Vegas moving to the East Coast in a city that I knew nothing about. Going from being a student that got a $2,500 stipend at most to being a professional basketball player making all this money, that’s a big jump -- from both a monetary and responsibility perspective.

But you have to be able to adjust and become a man in that sort of situation, and thanks to how my parents raised me, that’s what I did. I got used to Washington D.C. and became comfortable with my surroundings. From there, I've been able to take care of myself.

My vets have helped me tremendously in that aspect, too. Ian Mahinmi has taught me so much off the court, just about life. CJ Miles isn’t on the Wizards anymore, but he’s a really good vet and someone I still love and talk to today. Even though Garrett Temple was never my teammate, he used to be a part of this team and does amazing work with the NBPA. Guys like that are straight shooters; they go about their business with the utmost professionalism, and that’s been big for me to pick up from them.

On the floor, I feel like I’ve made so many strides since my rookie year; I don’t even feel like the same player. I was naive and didn’t really know anything back then. In my second season, I really learned the game and improved my basketball IQ. Looking at the numbers and just how much more I’m able to do, I definitely believe I took a jump.

In the last 10 games or so of this past year, we were in the bubble and the game really slowed down for me. Since I was playing big minutes, I was comfortable and poised whenever I hit the court because I was in control of my own game. When you don’t play as much and don’t have a consistent spot in the rotation, it makes it difficult for you to understand your role and what you’re capable of doing.

While we were in the bubble, it meant so much to me that the Wizards had a lot of confidence in me. They believed in me to take that opportunity and run with it, and to publicly back me up in that fashion gave me the confidence to get the job done. Before the season resumed, the team told us that the primary focus was going to be gaining experience and developing our game. They told me to go out there and play and not worry about the outcome or consequences. For me, they wanted to see how I could perform on that kind of stage. Everybody worked so hard to be prepared for the restart during quarantine, so I had to make sure that I honed-in on maintaining my body and worked on my game to be ready to play.

Being in the bubble itself, it was a controlled environment. The bubble brought our team closer together; for example, when you wanted to grab a bite to eat, who else would you get food with other than your teammates and coaches? We were all we had when we were in there.

I don’t know if a lot of players would admit this, but even though it wasn’t the best situation, I feel like it actually kinda helped. We didn’t have to travel and there weren’t many outside distractions, so we were just there to do our jobs. It definitely helped guys lock-in and take their game to another level.

With that being said, it’s over and done with now, so my attention turns to Year 3. I feel like for me, personally, it’s one of those things where there’s no excuses next season. I have to get the job done.

This offseason, I’m keying-in on improving my three-point shooting; I definitely have to get better at that. I know my percentage took a leap from my rookie to sophomore season, but improving to around that 40-percent mark would elevate my game so much more. Defensively, I want to sharpen my lateral quickness, which would be a huge step for me. If I can get those two things down pat, I feel like I can be in the league for a very long time.

From a physical standpoint, I’m working on my body to be able to guard wings consistently on a nightly basis. One of the toughest things about transitioning from college to the pros is learning how to handle the workload. You go from playing 30-something games to 82! I’ve found out how crucial it is to take the recovery aspect seriously, as well as my diet. I know how to take care of my body now.

Off the court, I’ve settled in too. It’s very strange that anyone can just look up your salary when you’re in the NBA; when people try to be cool with you, you don’t really know their intentions. That’s why I mainly surround myself with my family and closest friends (as you’ve seen in my vlogs).

People ask me which players I model my game after, and honestly, it’s not about the players themselves, but rather their skill sets. CJ McCollum has a high skill level that is predicated on his knowledge of the game more than his athleticism; I’m a huge fan of his. I watch a lot of Khris Middleton because we’re kind of the same height; he has a lot of poise and has a knack for getting to his spots. Jayson Tatum is another guy I study in terms of great offense in the low post. It’s not just the player, I try to take certain aspects of each guy’s skill set.

Of course, having an All-Star duo on your team always helps, too. Let me just say: we’re really excited to get John Wall back. He just looks really motivated, and with all the accolades he has, it’s awesome to see that he still has his hunger for the game. We’re still a rather young team, so John is very important in that vocal-leadership role to navigate us in the right direction. Getting him back with Bradley Beal, we already know what those two can do when they’re both healthy. It was hard in the past because either one or the other would be healthy, but not both. We could have one of the best backcourts in the NBA all over again.

D.C., we should be making a huge jump as a team next year, and our No. 1 goal and expectation is making the playoffs. As a team, our main focus is addressing the defensive end of the floor. If we’re going to be playing in the postseason, we can’t have the second-worst defensive rating in the league. I mean, our offense was in the top-10 last year. We’re scoring the basketball at such a high level, but we’re not getting stops on the other side.

We’re gonna be really good. We’ll make it all work together, and it’s my job to make sure I can complement John and Brad. When you’re playing with those guys, it makes things easier. But it also makes some things harder at the same time; for example, they’re going to take so much pressure off of me, but I have to figure out my role, find my niche and do what I’m good at. It’s almost like a give-and-take thing, but they’re taking for the right reasons.

With those guys playing at that level, you have to have that same level of confidence 100 percent of the time and be secure in your position. You have to know how good you are no matter what the ups and downs are. And most importantly, you have to be able to adjust and be versatile. Being versatile is super important; it makes you valuable in every aspect. The more versatile you are, the more playing time you’ll get because there’s nothing holding your coach back from putting you in a game.

It’s exciting to think about my third year because all I want to do is get better and improve in every aspect. The only thing that’s on my mind is the Wizards being in the playoffs. Personally, I don’t have any set agendas; maybe one day I want to be an NBA All-Star.

But for right now, I’m just taking things day-by-day.
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#630 » by WizarDynasty » Tue Nov 10, 2020 5:16 am

Ruzious wrote:
prime1time wrote:
Read on Twitter
?s=21

I think he feels more comfortable shooting off the dribble. And I'm sure he's diligently working on catching and shooting 3's - which he's going to have to do if he's playing with both Wall and Beal.



Just really bad form. His dribble power is horrible. When he is rising into his shot, his elbow is flat and not even at 45 degrees. he isn't even aiming his elbow at the basket. His back is not arched when he catches the ball of the bounce. He catches the ball with his elbow pointing to the ground instead of already aiming at the rim. He doesn't power dribble the ball before his catches it so that he doesn't have to lift the ball with his hands. the ball should be pushing your hands upward with bounce force. He has alot of mechanical issues. He is aiming his raising his elbow has he is rising into the shot, the elbow is suppose to already be raised before you even begin to rise into your shot, his back is not arched before he rises into his shot. Just a mess. But that's why Wizard don't manage their assets correctly. Gil would have had a much longer career here in Washington if front office could see these problems and correct them before they invest substantial resources.
I guess it's the players job to fix his mechanics since they are basically working on contracts? Why would Leonsis care if his players shot with correct mechanics. I would assume that if you spent a draft pick on a player, you would want to get has much high quality production as possible. You wouldn't want your player entering the building over weight, why would you want your player using improper mechanics? They both hurt your performance?
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#631 » by DCZards » Tue Nov 10, 2020 5:35 am

WizarDynasty wrote:Just really bad form. His dribble power is horrible. When he is rising into his shot, his elbow is flat and not even at 45 degrees. he isn't even aiming his elbow at the basket. His back is not arched when he catches the ball of the bounce. He catches the ball with his elbow pointing to the ground instead of already aiming at the rim. He doesn't power dribble the ball before his catches it so that he doesn't have to lift the ball with his hands. the ball should be pushing your hands upward with bounce force. He has alot of mechanical issues. He is aiming his raising his elbow has he is rising into the shot, the elbow is suppose to already be raised before you even begin to rise into your shot, his back is not arched before he rises into his shot. Just a mess. But that's why Wizard don't manage their assets correctly. Gil would have had a much longer career here in Washington if front office could see these problems and correct them before they invest substantial resources.
I guess it's the players job to fix his mechanics since they are basically working on contracts? Why would Leonsis care if his players shot with correct mechanics. I would assume that if you spent a draft pick on a player, you would want to get has much high quality production as possible. You wouldn't want your player entering the building over weight, why would you want your player using improper mechanics? They both hurt your performance?

So you're suggesting that if Troy listened to you he would have made 11 of 11 of these threes rather than 10 of 11?

Frankly, WizD, I don't think you have any idea what you're talking about when you opine on player's bodies, movements, mechanics, etc.

But it's often entertaining. :)
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#632 » by Ruzious » Tue Nov 10, 2020 8:15 am

Otoh, while I wouldn't put it the way that WizNas did, there definitely isn't an economy of movement on TBJ's 3. The release is good, but the rest of his mechanics are somewhat questionable. Then again, 10 of 11 is nothing to complain about.
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#633 » by nate33 » Tue Nov 10, 2020 2:16 pm

prime1time wrote:https://www.basketballnews.com/stories/nba-troy-brown-jr-washington-wizards-bubble-dc-make-jump-john-wall-bradley-beal-2020-2021-season

Essay from Troy Brown Jr.
Spoiler:
When I entered the NBA, I was an 18-year-old kid from Las Vegas moving to the East Coast in a city that I knew nothing about. Going from being a student that got a $2,500 stipend at most to being a professional basketball player making all this money, that’s a big jump -- from both a monetary and responsibility perspective.

But you have to be able to adjust and become a man in that sort of situation, and thanks to how my parents raised me, that’s what I did. I got used to Washington D.C. and became comfortable with my surroundings. From there, I've been able to take care of myself.

My vets have helped me tremendously in that aspect, too. Ian Mahinmi has taught me so much off the court, just about life. CJ Miles isn’t on the Wizards anymore, but he’s a really good vet and someone I still love and talk to today. Even though Garrett Temple was never my teammate, he used to be a part of this team and does amazing work with the NBPA. Guys like that are straight shooters; they go about their business with the utmost professionalism, and that’s been big for me to pick up from them.

On the floor, I feel like I’ve made so many strides since my rookie year; I don’t even feel like the same player. I was naive and didn’t really know anything back then. In my second season, I really learned the game and improved my basketball IQ. Looking at the numbers and just how much more I’m able to do, I definitely believe I took a jump.

In the last 10 games or so of this past year, we were in the bubble and the game really slowed down for me. Since I was playing big minutes, I was comfortable and poised whenever I hit the court because I was in control of my own game. When you don’t play as much and don’t have a consistent spot in the rotation, it makes it difficult for you to understand your role and what you’re capable of doing.

While we were in the bubble, it meant so much to me that the Wizards had a lot of confidence in me. They believed in me to take that opportunity and run with it, and to publicly back me up in that fashion gave me the confidence to get the job done. Before the season resumed, the team told us that the primary focus was going to be gaining experience and developing our game. They told me to go out there and play and not worry about the outcome or consequences. For me, they wanted to see how I could perform on that kind of stage. Everybody worked so hard to be prepared for the restart during quarantine, so I had to make sure that I honed-in on maintaining my body and worked on my game to be ready to play.

Being in the bubble itself, it was a controlled environment. The bubble brought our team closer together; for example, when you wanted to grab a bite to eat, who else would you get food with other than your teammates and coaches? We were all we had when we were in there.

I don’t know if a lot of players would admit this, but even though it wasn’t the best situation, I feel like it actually kinda helped. We didn’t have to travel and there weren’t many outside distractions, so we were just there to do our jobs. It definitely helped guys lock-in and take their game to another level.

With that being said, it’s over and done with now, so my attention turns to Year 3. I feel like for me, personally, it’s one of those things where there’s no excuses next season. I have to get the job done.

This offseason, I’m keying-in on improving my three-point shooting; I definitely have to get better at that. I know my percentage took a leap from my rookie to sophomore season, but improving to around that 40-percent mark would elevate my game so much more. Defensively, I want to sharpen my lateral quickness, which would be a huge step for me. If I can get those two things down pat, I feel like I can be in the league for a very long time.

From a physical standpoint, I’m working on my body to be able to guard wings consistently on a nightly basis. One of the toughest things about transitioning from college to the pros is learning how to handle the workload. You go from playing 30-something games to 82! I’ve found out how crucial it is to take the recovery aspect seriously, as well as my diet. I know how to take care of my body now.

Spoiler:
Off the court, I’ve settled in too. It’s very strange that anyone can just look up your salary when you’re in the NBA; when people try to be cool with you, you don’t really know their intentions. That’s why I mainly surround myself with my family and closest friends (as you’ve seen in my vlogs).

People ask me which players I model my game after, and honestly, it’s not about the players themselves, but rather their skill sets. CJ McCollum has a high skill level that is predicated on his knowledge of the game more than his athleticism; I’m a huge fan of his. I watch a lot of Khris Middleton because we’re kind of the same height; he has a lot of poise and has a knack for getting to his spots. Jayson Tatum is another guy I study in terms of great offense in the low post. It’s not just the player, I try to take certain aspects of each guy’s skill set.

Of course, having an All-Star duo on your team always helps, too. Let me just say: we’re really excited to get John Wall back. He just looks really motivated, and with all the accolades he has, it’s awesome to see that he still has his hunger for the game. We’re still a rather young team, so John is very important in that vocal-leadership role to navigate us in the right direction. Getting him back with Bradley Beal, we already know what those two can do when they’re both healthy. It was hard in the past because either one or the other would be healthy, but not both. We could have one of the best backcourts in the NBA all over again.

D.C., we should be making a huge jump as a team next year, and our No. 1 goal and expectation is making the playoffs. As a team, our main focus is addressing the defensive end of the floor. If we’re going to be playing in the postseason, we can’t have the second-worst defensive rating in the league. I mean, our offense was in the top-10 last year. We’re scoring the basketball at such a high level, but we’re not getting stops on the other side.

We’re gonna be really good. We’ll make it all work together, and it’s my job to make sure I can complement John and Brad. When you’re playing with those guys, it makes things easier. But it also makes some things harder at the same time; for example, they’re going to take so much pressure off of me, but I have to figure out my role, find my niche and do what I’m good at. It’s almost like a give-and-take thing, but they’re taking for the right reasons.

With those guys playing at that level, you have to have that same level of confidence 100 percent of the time and be secure in your position. You have to know how good you are no matter what the ups and downs are. And most importantly, you have to be able to adjust and be versatile. Being versatile is super important; it makes you valuable in every aspect. The more versatile you are, the more playing time you’ll get because there’s nothing holding your coach back from putting you in a game.

It’s exciting to think about my third year because all I want to do is get better and improve in every aspect. The only thing that’s on my mind is the Wizards being in the playoffs. Personally, I don’t have any set agendas; maybe one day I want to be an NBA All-Star.

But for right now, I’m just taking things day-by-day.


Kinda confirms my observations from the video. Brown looks a bit slimmer and quicker, because he's trying to improve his defense against wings.

You gotta love the guy's attitude. I sincerely hope that this is a breakout year for him. I see him as a 3rd guard for now, but maybe he'll be in the crunch time lineup at SF. He can also get extra minutes at PG if they load manage Wall so that Wall sits out 10-12 games or so.
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#634 » by WizarDynasty » Tue Nov 10, 2020 3:36 pm

DCZards wrote:
WizarDynasty wrote:Just really bad form. His dribble power is horrible. When he is rising into his shot, his elbow is flat and not even at 45 degrees. he isn't even aiming his elbow at the basket. His back is not arched when he catches the ball of the bounce. He catches the ball with his elbow pointing to the ground instead of already aiming at the rim. He doesn't power dribble the ball before his catches it so that he doesn't have to lift the ball with his hands. the ball should be pushing your hands upward with bounce force. He has alot of mechanical issues. He is aiming his raising his elbow has he is rising into the shot, the elbow is suppose to already be raised before you even begin to rise into your shot, his back is not arched before he rises into his shot. Just a mess. But that's why Wizard don't manage their assets correctly. Gil would have had a much longer career here in Washington if front office could see these problems and correct them before they invest substantial resources.
I guess it's the players job to fix his mechanics since they are basically working on contracts? Why would Leonsis care if his players shot with correct mechanics. I would assume that if you spent a draft pick on a player, you would want to get has much high quality production as possible. You wouldn't want your player entering the building over weight, why would you want your player using improper mechanics? They both hurt your performance?

So you're suggesting that if Troy listened to you he would have made 11 of 11 of these threes rather than 10 of 11?

Frankly, WizD, I don't think you have any idea what you're talking about when you opine on player's bodies, movements, mechanics, etc.

But it's often entertaining. :)


It's not about making the shot, it's about making the shot with a quick high release point, and landing from your shot with your momentum going backwards before you land.
Being able to make the shot and preserve your knees. NO arch in his back before he begins to rise that his knees won't last long because of his momentum while landing. He is generating an arch in his back midair and attempting to aim his elbow at the same time. Decreases accuracy tremendously because you have to adjust your arch and aim your elbow at the same time. Because his back isn't arch before he rises, he can't focuses on fine control over his elbow. His attention can't do two things at once which his arch your back and adjust your elbow and hence his elbow suffers. Low elbow means that he can't get that shot with a high release point. Low elbow also means he can't force his momentum backwards as he is shooting because he won't have enough arch on his shot. He needs generate more power with his hips. Right now he is generating most of the power of his shot with his shoulders. Look I am a fan of all wizards who put in work together. He definitely has good work ethic. But you have to measure success, not just with numbers, but with reducing wear and tear on your joints and creating a quick high release that is unguardable at the same time.

I think if he focuses on moving laterally while maintain a deep hip bend would be great for him. He has to learn to keep deep hip bend and move on the ball of your feet with a arched back. Its like boxing, you have right stance and a left stance. If he can switch your stance without breaking your hip bend, he will be well on his way. being able to jump rope for long periods of time by keeping a deep hip bend. Key is to never break your keep hip bend while you jump rope. you don't ever move your hips or knees during the jump rope, only bounce on your toes. That will really help him improve his lightness on he feet and lateral agility.

Then you gotta practice, keep a deep hip and literally moving laterally by bouncing left and right. He has to learn to moving with his feet spread apart. He needs like a 3 foot ruler tied between his ankles to force him keep them separated and then move sideways, and change directions. Really forces him to correctly and fluidly on his toes. Hope that helps him. I like his character.

So again, when he catches that ball, that ball should be rising from the ground with so much force that its actually pushing his shooting hand upward.. he should never be lifting the ball, the ball should be pushing his hand upward. That tell me he needs more strength with his dribble. The second thing I see is that when he catches the ball, his elbow is pointing the ground behind him. Huge no no. That elbow should be pointing in front him when he catches the ball. He should be manipulating his body so that when the passes comes he catches it with his elbow in correct position. It's troy browns job to teach his team mates where to pass him the ball. It's his job to teach his trainer where to bounce the ball so that he catches in optimal form. The person passing you ball can help you get off a quick release or force you to shoot with bad mechanics. It's not like Troy Brown is playing pick up ball with people he doesn't know. If your trainer isn't skilled at passing then Troy Brown teaches how to pass the ball so that he catches it with great mechanics. I see the trainer passing the ball and forcing troy to be in an upright posture, the ball should be passes so that troy catch point allows him to be in a deep hip bend position.
The people you play with can reinforce bad habits. Playing with Talented passers, they can visualize where you catch the ball and force you into a good mechanics. just looking at the twitter video, the ball catch point should have been to Troy's outer hand with force and below his hip. the trainer past the ball right into Troy's chest. That's a horrible ball placement and reinforces bad mechanics. AGain Troy should have caught that ball with one hand extended out from his body like a hang dribble. It's Troy's fault, he either hires better passers or trains his assistants to pass the way an elite passer would pass to him.
A pass should never be passed into a player core, it should be passes so that he can catch the ball with one hand outside of his body and allows him to maintain a deep hip bend.
So again..fault Troy Brown for not being aware and maybe even fault john Wall since john is probably the one that will be passing to troy during the season. Wall should make sure that "warriors" have the right mechanics to get off quick release shots from his passes. All of john's passes should be made to force his players into deep hip bends as they receive the pass so that they are in explosive positions. Catching the ball with a deep hip bend means the player can either explode for quick shots or burst by his man. But if you don't practice passing to your team mates with a deep hip bend, then you can't do it during the games. John is the point guard, captain of the team, and controls where that ball is caught by his team mates. Wall alone can pass the ball and force his team mates into deep hip bend explosive stances.
So at the end of the day....it all Falls on Wall and Beal. They are two awesome character guys---with talent that we are lucky to have and hopefully for a long time.

Hint...think of your pass as ...where the ball should be when you crossover.... the ball should be at the end of crossover with hip deeply bent. As a passer, you force the player to extend that far our from his body and catch the ball with one hand. The more you practice delivering passes like that, the better your team mates will be at controlling the ball with force using one hand extended from their body. Wall alone has the ability to improve all of his team mates deep hip, mechanics,...everything. Point guard controls the receiving point of the ball to player he passes to. Ball as the ball on every possession. It's the fine points like this that takes your team to the next level. It's not like pick up basketball where you never know who you are playing with. So this is how Troy Brown gets better. Using these ideas.

Finally, go to any allen iverson crossover video and see where the ball is just before he crosses it. That's is where the ball should be aimed at when passing. A bounce pass to a team mate should be like a return crossover when AI is moving the ball from one hand to the other. the force and speed of the ball and how AI controls the ball. That's how trainers should pass the ball. Wizard should train their players to receive the ball with arm extended like AI crossover.
I can look at video and see that trainer is passing the ball directly into Troy's Brown chest. Up the skills of the trainer so that by forcing them to watch allen iverson video and tell them you want the ball placed at the same point that AI bounces the ball from one hand to other while keep a deep hip bend.
Wizard players like Troy Brown have to take improvement into their own hands. you can't rely on the organization's coaches to teach advanced techniques. You have to be executive and instruct them what needs to be done. I have laid on the blueprint, but its up to John Wall, Bradley Beal, and Troy Brown to force their trainers put these ideas into play.
If they don't do it, no one will, and they will stay mediocre.

and yet this is the final, Troy should never lift the ball up, that tell me you are not bouncing the ball strong enough on the bounce just before you shoot. You should time your dribble so that you catch the ball with a deep hip bend. I see Troy catch the ball and then do a deep hip bend, and don't rise up from the deep bend until your elbow is pointing at the basket. He is rising up with his elbow aimed at the ground. Huge no no.

ok promise, finally... your back lower back should be arched before you catch you last dribble...and your lower back should be arched before you catch the pass. Troy is going to have to make a mental effort to adjust his back before he catches his last dribble for a jumpshot... and make sure you back is arched and your shoulders are back...not leaning forward like i see it the video. before the ball hits your hands on a pass. He should never be dipping the ball when he catches it. His hips should already be deeply bent just as he catching the ball. He catches the ball, dips the ball and dips his hips. those hips should have been deeply dipped before the ball got there.

and he catches and controls the ball well below his waist. YOu power bounce the ball so that it rises to your "nipples" ..that' where the place where you catch the ball so that your elbow is correctly aligned. He should never bull the ball up from the ground.
His habit is so bad that when he catches the ball high, he still dips the ball downward because that's what he has trained his brain to do. when you handle is elite, you don't even need to grab the ball with two hands...the ball is pushing your hand up in the air...iyou don't have to lift the ball up or catch with two hands below your stomach. I think i covered everything.

AI was able to control the return force of the ball exceptionally. He bounced the ball so hard that the ball was actually pushing up against his hand which is why it hovers. Most players can't bounce the force and control the return force in their hand. The ball want to keep going up in the sky but AI prevents it from going up. So instead of going up, the ball pushes AI's hand up. It hovers and pushes his hand upward. AI can do all types of tricks with the ball as it is pushing his hand upward. Ai does elite foot movement work. Previous generations don't show this ability, maybe Tim Hardaway. the key idea is that if AI didn't stop the ball with his hand, the ball would bounce well over his head. He has mastered the bounce ball exceptionally hard and prevent it from rising. He absorbs the upward force with his hands and ball sticks to his hand like a magnet. You're welcome [url][/url]
Build your team with five shooters using Paul Pierce Form deeply bent hips and lower back arch at same time. before rising into shot. Elbow not pointing to the ground! } Avdija=young Paul Pierce
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#635 » by pcbothwel » Tue Nov 10, 2020 4:05 pm

nate33 wrote:
prime1time wrote:https://www.basketballnews.com/stories/nba-troy-brown-jr-washington-wizards-bubble-dc-make-jump-john-wall-bradley-beal-2020-2021-season

Essay from Troy Brown Jr.
Spoiler:
When I entered the NBA, I was an 18-year-old kid from Las Vegas moving to the East Coast in a city that I knew nothing about. Going from being a student that got a $2,500 stipend at most to being a professional basketball player making all this money, that’s a big jump -- from both a monetary and responsibility perspective.

But you have to be able to adjust and become a man in that sort of situation, and thanks to how my parents raised me, that’s what I did. I got used to Washington D.C. and became comfortable with my surroundings. From there, I've been able to take care of myself.

My vets have helped me tremendously in that aspect, too. Ian Mahinmi has taught me so much off the court, just about life. CJ Miles isn’t on the Wizards anymore, but he’s a really good vet and someone I still love and talk to today. Even though Garrett Temple was never my teammate, he used to be a part of this team and does amazing work with the NBPA. Guys like that are straight shooters; they go about their business with the utmost professionalism, and that’s been big for me to pick up from them.

On the floor, I feel like I’ve made so many strides since my rookie year; I don’t even feel like the same player. I was naive and didn’t really know anything back then. In my second season, I really learned the game and improved my basketball IQ. Looking at the numbers and just how much more I’m able to do, I definitely believe I took a jump.

In the last 10 games or so of this past year, we were in the bubble and the game really slowed down for me. Since I was playing big minutes, I was comfortable and poised whenever I hit the court because I was in control of my own game. When you don’t play as much and don’t have a consistent spot in the rotation, it makes it difficult for you to understand your role and what you’re capable of doing.

While we were in the bubble, it meant so much to me that the Wizards had a lot of confidence in me. They believed in me to take that opportunity and run with it, and to publicly back me up in that fashion gave me the confidence to get the job done. Before the season resumed, the team told us that the primary focus was going to be gaining experience and developing our game. They told me to go out there and play and not worry about the outcome or consequences. For me, they wanted to see how I could perform on that kind of stage. Everybody worked so hard to be prepared for the restart during quarantine, so I had to make sure that I honed-in on maintaining my body and worked on my game to be ready to play.

Being in the bubble itself, it was a controlled environment. The bubble brought our team closer together; for example, when you wanted to grab a bite to eat, who else would you get food with other than your teammates and coaches? We were all we had when we were in there.

I don’t know if a lot of players would admit this, but even though it wasn’t the best situation, I feel like it actually kinda helped. We didn’t have to travel and there weren’t many outside distractions, so we were just there to do our jobs. It definitely helped guys lock-in and take their game to another level.

With that being said, it’s over and done with now, so my attention turns to Year 3. I feel like for me, personally, it’s one of those things where there’s no excuses next season. I have to get the job done.

This offseason, I’m keying-in on improving my three-point shooting; I definitely have to get better at that. I know my percentage took a leap from my rookie to sophomore season, but improving to around that 40-percent mark would elevate my game so much more. Defensively, I want to sharpen my lateral quickness, which would be a huge step for me. If I can get those two things down pat, I feel like I can be in the league for a very long time.

From a physical standpoint, I’m working on my body to be able to guard wings consistently on a nightly basis. One of the toughest things about transitioning from college to the pros is learning how to handle the workload. You go from playing 30-something games to 82! I’ve found out how crucial it is to take the recovery aspect seriously, as well as my diet. I know how to take care of my body now.

Spoiler:
Off the court, I’ve settled in too. It’s very strange that anyone can just look up your salary when you’re in the NBA; when people try to be cool with you, you don’t really know their intentions. That’s why I mainly surround myself with my family and closest friends (as you’ve seen in my vlogs).

People ask me which players I model my game after, and honestly, it’s not about the players themselves, but rather their skill sets. CJ McCollum has a high skill level that is predicated on his knowledge of the game more than his athleticism; I’m a huge fan of his. I watch a lot of Khris Middleton because we’re kind of the same height; he has a lot of poise and has a knack for getting to his spots. Jayson Tatum is another guy I study in terms of great offense in the low post. It’s not just the player, I try to take certain aspects of each guy’s skill set.

Of course, having an All-Star duo on your team always helps, too. Let me just say: we’re really excited to get John Wall back. He just looks really motivated, and with all the accolades he has, it’s awesome to see that he still has his hunger for the game. We’re still a rather young team, so John is very important in that vocal-leadership role to navigate us in the right direction. Getting him back with Bradley Beal, we already know what those two can do when they’re both healthy. It was hard in the past because either one or the other would be healthy, but not both. We could have one of the best backcourts in the NBA all over again.

D.C., we should be making a huge jump as a team next year, and our No. 1 goal and expectation is making the playoffs. As a team, our main focus is addressing the defensive end of the floor. If we’re going to be playing in the postseason, we can’t have the second-worst defensive rating in the league. I mean, our offense was in the top-10 last year. We’re scoring the basketball at such a high level, but we’re not getting stops on the other side.

We’re gonna be really good. We’ll make it all work together, and it’s my job to make sure I can complement John and Brad. When you’re playing with those guys, it makes things easier. But it also makes some things harder at the same time; for example, they’re going to take so much pressure off of me, but I have to figure out my role, find my niche and do what I’m good at. It’s almost like a give-and-take thing, but they’re taking for the right reasons.

With those guys playing at that level, you have to have that same level of confidence 100 percent of the time and be secure in your position. You have to know how good you are no matter what the ups and downs are. And most importantly, you have to be able to adjust and be versatile. Being versatile is super important; it makes you valuable in every aspect. The more versatile you are, the more playing time you’ll get because there’s nothing holding your coach back from putting you in a game.

It’s exciting to think about my third year because all I want to do is get better and improve in every aspect. The only thing that’s on my mind is the Wizards being in the playoffs. Personally, I don’t have any set agendas; maybe one day I want to be an NBA All-Star.

But for right now, I’m just taking things day-by-day.


Kinda confirms my observations from the video. Brown looks a bit slimmer and quicker, because he's trying to improve his defense against wings.

You gotta love the guy's attitude. I sincerely hope that this is a breakout year for him. I see him as a 3rd guard for now, but maybe he'll be in the crunch time lineup at SF. He can also get extra minutes at PG if they load manage Wall so that Wall sits out 10-12 games or so.


Im telling you, Troy is going to hit. He reminds of Brad in some ways, but I just see an overall professional. Improvements on defense along with a more consistent shot, and the guy will be the legit Otto replacement we were searching for.

I dont think people appreciate how good Brown is for his age. For context, It took CJ McCollum until his 3rd season at age 24 and Kris Middleton his 3rd season at age 23 to breakout and be better than Troy Brown was in his 2nd year at age 20.
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#636 » by prime1time » Tue Nov 10, 2020 4:29 pm

I like Troy. I also like the culture that Brad has created. What do you guys see as his role this year? Does he start at the 3? IMO, I like him more coming off the bench as a 6th man and closing games.
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#637 » by nate33 » Tue Nov 10, 2020 5:07 pm

prime1time wrote:I like Troy. I also like the culture that Brad has created. What do you guys see as his role this year? Does he start at the 3? IMO, I like him more coming off the bench as a 6th man and closing games.

I kinda like Bonga as a starter, even if it's only for the first 6 minutes of each half to pester the opposition's best wing on D while standing in the corner on offense. He can play at max effort and not worry about foul trouble. Meanwhile, Troy would be best utilized as a primary playmaker on the 2nd unit when Brad and/or Wall sit.

Later in games, when the opposition figures out our sets and it's time to improvise more on offense, it may make more sense to have Troy in the game at SF to take advantage of his playmaking skills.
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#638 » by payitforward » Tue Nov 10, 2020 10:25 pm

Can you please explain these point?

WizarDynasty wrote:...He catches the ball with his elbow pointing to the ground instead of already aiming at the rim....
How would you do that, I wonder? What if your back is to the rim when you catch the ball? What if it's at 90 degrees to the rim? 60 degrees? How would he "catch the ball with his elbow... already aiming at the rim"? Don't you have to catch the ball where it is? What if it's too high or low, or too far left or right, for you elbow to be aimed at the rim when you catch it?

WizarDynasty wrote:...He doesn't power dribble the ball before he catches it...

Hmmm... how can you dribble a ball before you catch it?

so that he doesn't have to lift the ball with his hands. the ball should be pushing your hands upward with bounce force. He has alot of mechanical issues.

WizarDynasty wrote:...He is aiming his raising his elbow has he is rising into the shot, the elbow is suppose to already be raised before you even begin to rise into your shot, his back is not arched before he rises into his shot....

Can you link to some video of a player who does those things the way you are suggesting they should be done: i.e., if I understand this correctly, first he raises his elbow, then he arches his back, then he rises into his shot.... I'd like to see what that looks like.

WizarDynasty wrote:...Wizard don't manage their assets correctly. ...why would you want your player using improper mechanics?
Remember -- if you don't like the post above: blame Doc not me.
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#639 » by WizarDynasty » Tue Nov 10, 2020 10:33 pm

payitforward wrote:Can you please explain these point?

WizarDynasty wrote:...He catches the ball with his elbow pointing to the ground instead of already aiming at the rim....
How would you do that, I wonder? What if your back is to the rim when you catch the ball? What if it's at 90 degrees to the rim? 60 degrees? How would he "catch the ball with his elbow... already aiming at the rim"? Don't you have to catch the ball where it is? What if it's too high or low, or too far left or right, for you elbow to be aimed at the rim when you catch it?

WizarDynasty wrote:...He doesn't power dribble the ball before he catches it...

Hmmm... how can you dribble a ball before you catch it?

so that he doesn't have to lift the ball with his hands. the ball should be pushing your hands upward with bounce force. He has alot of mechanical issues.

WizarDynasty wrote:...He is aiming his raising his elbow has he is rising into the shot, the elbow is suppose to already be raised before you even begin to rise into your shot, his back is not arched before he rises into his shot....

Can you link to some video of a player who does those things the way you are suggesting they should be done: i.e., if I understand this correctly, first he raises his elbow, then he arches his back, then he rises into his shot.... I'd like to see what that looks like.

WizarDynasty wrote:...Wizard don't manage their assets correctly. ...why would you want your player using improper mechanics?


Hey Pay...if we have the video playing, i could do timestamps to illustrate exactly what I discussing. If I get a bunch of time, I might try to compile something like that.
Build your team with five shooters using Paul Pierce Form deeply bent hips and lower back arch at same time. before rising into shot. Elbow not pointing to the ground! } Avdija=young Paul Pierce
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Re: The Troy Brown Thread 

Post#640 » by payitforward » Wed Nov 11, 2020 12:26 am

Would be great, man -- hope you do have the time.
Remember -- if you don't like the post above: blame Doc not me.

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