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Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition - POLL UPDATE!)

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WHO SHOULD BE THE NEXT COACH?

Charles Lee (Bucks Assistant, 2018-present)
1
6%
David Blatt (Olympiacos HC, 2018-2019)
3
17%
David Vanterpool (Timberwolves Associate HC, 2019-present)
1
6%
Ime Udoka (Nets Assistant, 2020-present)
0
No votes
Jay Wright (Villanova HC, 2001-present)
6
33%
Kenny Atkinson (Clippers Assistant, 2020-present)
3
17%
Mitch Johnson (Spurs Assistant and G-League Assistant, 2017-present)
1
6%
Robert Pack (Wizards Assistant, 2018-present)
1
6%
Wes Unseld, Jr. (Nuggets Assistant, 2015-present)
2
11%
 
Total votes: 18

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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#21 » by Eli Babak » Thu Mar 18, 2021 2:53 pm

NatP4 wrote:
Eli Babak wrote:I wish they'd fire Brooks right now. Trade Lopez (and any other vet) and hopefully Bertans too. Figure things out with Westbrick and Beal in the summer. Tell the interim coach to put youngsters (Winston, Brown, Bonga) in rotation. And this time do a proper search for a coach instead of signing someone based on their reputation or just being a nice guy...


I want this too, but I am okay with tanking for a better pick. If you put all those guys into the rotation and hired a competent coach, they would start winning games.


Yep - you're right.

My guess is Ujiri stays in Toronto and Wiz (Ted & Tommy) end up offering Juwan Howard a huge contract. Or have they burned bridges with him or something? I don't know. :D
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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#22 » by NatP4 » Thu Mar 18, 2021 2:57 pm

Eli Babak wrote:
NatP4 wrote:
Eli Babak wrote:I wish they'd fire Brooks right now. Trade Lopez (and any other vet) and hopefully Bertans too. Figure things out with Westbrick and Beal in the summer. Tell the interim coach to put youngsters (Winston, Brown, Bonga) in rotation. And this time do a proper search for a coach instead of signing someone based on their reputation or just being a nice guy...


I want this too, but I am okay with tanking for a better pick. If you put all those guys into the rotation and hired a competent coach, they would start winning games.


Yep - you're right.

My guess is Ujiri stays in Toronto and Wiz (Ted & Tommy) end up offering Juwan Howard a huge contract. Or have they burned bridges with him or something? I don't know. :D


From watching Michigan play all year, that might not be a bad idea. They play really awesome spread out basketball with great ball movement and high level defense. Though, they did all of that before he got there and a lot of it is Franz Wagner being awesome.

I feel good about the Ujiri possibility after reading the raps board. They almost expect it at this point.
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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#23 » by nate33 » Thu Mar 18, 2021 3:05 pm

I'm reflexively skeptical of former NBA star players as coaches. My belief is that their coaching inevitably gets overrated due to nostalgia about their success as a player. In fact, it's usually the case that star players make lousy coaches because they don't know how to relate to most ordinary players who lack their elite athleticism, coordination or instincts.

I think former players can make good coaches, but it's typically the grinder role players with so-so athleticism who have had to outthink and out-scheme their opponent their entire career just to get on the floor.

The only caveat would be former star players whose NBA success was clearly and obviously due as much to their basketball IQ as their physical ability - guys like Tim Duncan, Chris Paul and Steve Nash.

Juwan Howard as a basketball player did nothing to make me believe he is one of the 30 best and brightest basketball minds on the planet, suitable to coach the NBA. I would prefer to grade him solely on his coaching success. He has done a nice job this season at Michigan, but I'd like to see his track record over a few more years before committing to him.

The thing I want most in a coach is a guy who can implement a player development plan. I want someone who is familiar with how they do it in San Antonio, Toronto or Miami, where we consistently see late draft picks steadily get better and better until they're quality starters.
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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#24 » by NatP4 » Thu Mar 18, 2021 3:15 pm

I would give Jay Wright an offer he can’t refuse. It was a rough season for Nova with injuries, still coached them to a respectable season. He’s more likely to leave after this year than ever before. I think he’s been the best coach in college basketball over the last decade. Consistently brings in lower recruited players and competes on the national stage and graduates players to the NBA, and not just to be marginal replacement level players, to be quality NBA players. All of his players play with effort and high basketball IQ. They play elite offensive basketball with the floor spread and ball movement. He is one of the highest character coaches that has brought a terrific culture to the program.

Just look at his talent evaluation. Saddiq Bey was a 3 star recruit. Divincenzo? Not in the top 100. Mikel Bridges was a low ranked 4 star at 81st in the country. Same thing with Josh Hart at 79th in the country.

You can’t name another program in the country that consistently finds non 5 star/top 50 talent and turns them into quality NBA players and competes for national championships.
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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#25 » by DCZards » Thu Mar 18, 2021 4:23 pm

Here's what Dame Lillard tweeted about Vanterpool after the T'Wolves recently passed over him to hire Chris Finch. Kinda where I'm coming from.

How the hell do you not hire David Vanterpool and he’s right there on the bench... and has been in front office SUCCESSFULLY and on the front of a bench of a winning team SUCCESSFULLY (7 years) ... and also has played a major role in the development of a dominant backcourt smdh!
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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#26 » by NatP4 » Thu Mar 18, 2021 4:29 pm

I wouldn’t hold it against them obviously, but former NBA playing experience/DC ties would not be factors for me at all.
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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#27 » by nate33 » Thu Mar 18, 2021 5:29 pm

NatP4 wrote:I wouldn’t hold it against them obviously, but former NBA playing experience/DC ties would not be factors for me at all.

I might actually hold it against them. We need a new philosophy around here because obviously the old way of thinking isn't working. The team hasn't won 50 games in 40 years.
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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#28 » by Kanyewest » Thu Mar 18, 2021 5:29 pm

nate33 wrote:I'm reflexively skeptical of former NBA star players as coaches. My belief is that their coaching inevitably gets overrated due to nostalgia about their success as a player. In fact, it's usually the case that star players make lousy coaches because they don't know how to relate to most ordinary players who lack their elite athleticism, coordination or instincts.

I think former players can make good coaches, but it's typically the grinder role players with so-so athleticism who have had to outthink and out-scheme their opponent their entire career just to get on the floor.

The only caveat would be former star players whose NBA success was clearly and obviously due as much to their basketball IQ as their physical ability - guys like Tim Duncan, Chris Paul and Steve Nash.

Juwan Howard as a basketball player did nothing to make me believe he is one of the 30 best and brightest basketball minds on the planet, suitable to coach the NBA. I would prefer to grade him solely on his coaching success. He has done a nice job this season at Michigan, but I'd like to see his track record over a few more years before committing to him.

The thing I want most in a coach is a guy who can implement a player development plan. I want someone who is familiar with how they do it in San Antonio, Toronto or Miami, where we consistently see late draft picks steadily get better and better until they're quality starters.


Howard did prove to be a grindy type of role player towards the end of his career. Crazy to think he played with Webber in the 1990s but also won two rings with the Heat and LeBron. And Howard was an assistant for several years with the Heat.
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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#29 » by nate33 » Thu Mar 18, 2021 5:33 pm

Kanyewest wrote:
nate33 wrote:I'm reflexively skeptical of former NBA star players as coaches. My belief is that their coaching inevitably gets overrated due to nostalgia about their success as a player. In fact, it's usually the case that star players make lousy coaches because they don't know how to relate to most ordinary players who lack their elite athleticism, coordination or instincts.

I think former players can make good coaches, but it's typically the grinder role players with so-so athleticism who have had to outthink and out-scheme their opponent their entire career just to get on the floor.

The only caveat would be former star players whose NBA success was clearly and obviously due as much to their basketball IQ as their physical ability - guys like Tim Duncan, Chris Paul and Steve Nash.

Juwan Howard as a basketball player did nothing to make me believe he is one of the 30 best and brightest basketball minds on the planet, suitable to coach the NBA. I would prefer to grade him solely on his coaching success. He has done a nice job this season at Michigan, but I'd like to see his track record over a few more years before committing to him.

The thing I want most in a coach is a guy who can implement a player development plan. I want someone who is familiar with how they do it in San Antonio, Toronto or Miami, where we consistently see late draft picks steadily get better and better until they're quality starters.


Howard did prove to be a grindy type of role player towards the end of his career. Crazy to think he played with Webber in the 1990s but also won two rings with the Heat and LeBron. And Howard was an assistant for several years with the Heat.

Agreed. Nothing in Howard's history disqualifies him as a potential coach, and I agree that he is steadily building a resume that may well put him on an NBA coaching path. I'd like to see sustained success in Michigan though. His 2nd year has indeed been very good.
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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#30 » by queridiculo » Thu Mar 18, 2021 5:44 pm

David Stern throwing Pollin a bone on the Howard deal is up there with some of the worst things that happened to the Bullets/Wizards over the last three decades but you can't fault Juwan for taking the money of after how poorly the Bullets negotiated his rookie deal.

I wouldn't mind if the Wizards gave Howard a shot.

He's seen it all and he's a basketball lifer that's always applied himself 100% whatever his role.

The league needs more black headcoaches, I would root for Howard to succeed with Washington.
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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#31 » by Kanyewest » Thu Mar 18, 2021 5:46 pm

NatP4 wrote:I would give Jay Wright an offer he can’t refuse. It was a rough season for Nova with injuries, still coached them to a respectable season. He’s more likely to leave after this year than ever before. I think he’s been the best coach in college basketball over the last decade. Consistently brings in lower recruited players and competes on the national stage and graduates players to the NBA, and not just to be marginal replacement level players, to be quality NBA players. All of his players play with effort and high basketball IQ. They play elite offensive basketball with the floor spread and ball movement. He is one of the highest character coaches that has brought a terrific culture to the program.

Just look at his talent evaluation. Saddiq Bey was a 3 star recruit. Divincenzo? Not in the top 100. Mikel Bridges was a low ranked 4 star at 81st in the country. Same thing with Josh Hart at 79th in the country.

You can’t name another program in the country that consistently finds non 5 star/top 50 talent and turns them into quality NBA players and competes for national championships.


Wright also currently has the #3 recruiting class incoming for 2021 and that doesn't include a 5 star recruit that is considering Villanova. It appears he's turn down overtures from the 76ers so it would probably have to be a very big offer for Wright to even consider it.
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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#32 » by Kanyewest » Thu Mar 18, 2021 5:48 pm

queridiculo wrote:David Stern throwing Pollin a bone on the Howard deal is up there with some of the worst things that happened to the Bullets/Wizards over the last three decades but you can't fault Juwan for taking the money of after how poorly the Bullets negotiated his rookie deal.

I wouldn't mind if the Wizards gave Howard a shot.

He's seen it all and he's a basketball lifer that's always applied himself 100% whatever his role.

The league needs more black headcoaches, I would root for Howard to succeed with Washington.


The Bullets would have screwed it up anyways. IIRC they traded Rasheed Wallace for Strickland during the interim when they thought they had lost Juwan Howard.
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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#33 » by queridiculo » Thu Mar 18, 2021 6:00 pm

nate33 wrote:I'm reflexively skeptical of former NBA star players as coaches. My belief is that their coaching inevitably gets overrated due to nostalgia about their success as a player. In fact, it's usually the case that star players make lousy coaches because they don't know how to relate to most ordinary players who lack their elite athleticism, coordination or instincts.

I think former players can make good coaches, but it's typically the grinder role players with so-so athleticism who have had to outthink and out-scheme their opponent their entire career just to get on the floor.

The only caveat would be former star players whose NBA success was clearly and obviously due as much to their basketball IQ as their physical ability - guys like Tim Duncan, Chris Paul and Steve Nash.

Juwan Howard as a basketball player did nothing to make me believe he is one of the 30 best and brightest basketball minds on the planet, suitable to coach the NBA. I would prefer to grade him solely on his coaching success. He has done a nice job this season at Michigan, but I'd like to see his track record over a few more years before committing to him.

The thing I want most in a coach is a guy who can implement a player development plan. I want someone who is familiar with how they do it in San Antonio, Toronto or Miami, where we consistently see late draft picks steadily get better and better until they're quality starters.


Eh, I get what you're saying, but my recall about Howard may be quite a bit different than yours.

The Howard I remember wasn't a guy that was exceptionally blessed athletically or physically gifted, or somebody I would consider a star.

He built an 18 year NBA career on hard work and dedication, despite playing the majority of it out of position and at a physical disadvantage for his position.

I'll take guys like that all day long, and being part of that Heat culture he knows exactly what it takes to succeed on this level.

This piece on Howard if you haven't read yet provides some insight into how he ticks, it paints a picture quite different than the one you are painting about star players.

https://www.si.com/college/2021/03/15/juwan-howard-michigan-donnie-kirksey-daily-cover

As Juwan reached his 30s, his skills and playing time declining, Jenine wanted him to retire. Donnie teased Jenine that Juwan would never walk away, that he would play as long as he could and then coach. Jenine jokes, “I wanted to kill him,” but of course Donnie was right. Juwan retired from the Heat and became an assistant coach, working for the team whose ethos most suits his own. In that role, he could handle the losses. But he got frustrated by entitled players who didn’t work hard, who did not value the game as he did. He wanted young Juwan Howards, and he wanted to be their Donnie Kirksey. Juwan and Donnie both loved basketball, of course, but a lot of people in Chicago loved basketball. Donnie loved players who took the game seriously, and Juwan was drawn to the work.

Even now, with Michigan on anybody’s short list of national-title contenders, some people don’t get it. There are whispers that assistant Phil Martelli, the longtime head coach at St. Joseph’s, does the coaching and Howard does the publicity and the recruiting (he has the nation’s No. 1 class coming in next season). There are racist undertones there: Howard, the only Black head coach in the Big Ten, surely must need a white guy to show him the way.

But anybody close to the program knows better. On most days, Howard gets up at 5:30 and makes a coffee on his Nespresso machine and adds two packets of raw sugar as Jenine makes him breakfast. It’s her chance to see him, but also her chance to make sure he consumes food before basketball consumes him. So she does it right: avocado toast on Ezekiel bread with smoked salmon and truffle oil, or his favorite, turkey sausages. He is out the door by 6:30, breakfast in hand. It is often the last thing he eats before he gets home at night; he then grabs a bite and goes back to work.

This is typical behavior for a major-college basketball coach. But it is not typical for somebody who made more than $150 million playing in the NBA. The parts of the job that people thought Howard would hate are what he loves most. He looks forward to every practice. He encourages college players with a fraction of his résumé to pause practice if they have something to teach a teammate. He likes recruiting. Sometimes, when he sees Michigan’s women’s team running through the school’s Player Development Center, he stops practice to give the head women’s coach, Kim Barnes Arico, a high-five. When Michigan needs to call a play late in the game, Howard draws it up. Juwan has told Jenine the only part of the job he really doesn’t enjoy is dealing with the media—not because he gets criticized, but because it’s repetitive.
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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#34 » by queridiculo » Thu Mar 18, 2021 6:01 pm

nate33 wrote:
Kanyewest wrote:
nate33 wrote:I'm reflexively skeptical of former NBA star players as coaches. My belief is that their coaching inevitably gets overrated due to nostalgia about their success as a player. In fact, it's usually the case that star players make lousy coaches because they don't know how to relate to most ordinary players who lack their elite athleticism, coordination or instincts.

I think former players can make good coaches, but it's typically the grinder role players with so-so athleticism who have had to outthink and out-scheme their opponent their entire career just to get on the floor.

The only caveat would be former star players whose NBA success was clearly and obviously due as much to their basketball IQ as their physical ability - guys like Tim Duncan, Chris Paul and Steve Nash.

Juwan Howard as a basketball player did nothing to make me believe he is one of the 30 best and brightest basketball minds on the planet, suitable to coach the NBA. I would prefer to grade him solely on his coaching success. He has done a nice job this season at Michigan, but I'd like to see his track record over a few more years before committing to him.

The thing I want most in a coach is a guy who can implement a player development plan. I want someone who is familiar with how they do it in San Antonio, Toronto or Miami, where we consistently see late draft picks steadily get better and better until they're quality starters.


Howard did prove to be a grindy type of role player towards the end of his career. Crazy to think he played with Webber in the 1990s but also won two rings with the Heat and LeBron. And Howard was an assistant for several years with the Heat.

Agreed. Nothing in Howard's history disqualifies him as a potential coach, and I agree that he is steadily building a resume that may well put him on an NBA coaching path. I'd like to see sustained success in Michigan though. His 2nd year has indeed been very good.


Sure, but sometimes you just have to take a shot before somebody else does.

How much longer should Danny Ainge have waited for Brett Stevens?
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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#35 » by DCZards » Thu Mar 18, 2021 6:07 pm

nate33 wrote:
NatP4 wrote:I wouldn’t hold it against them obviously, but former NBA playing experience/DC ties would not be factors for me at all.

I might actually hold it against them. We need a new philosophy around here because obviously the old way of thinking isn't working. The team hasn't won 50 games in 40 years.

I totally agree that NBA playing experience and DC ties should not be factors in selecting a new Zards coach. But I see absolutely no reason to hold those things against a candidate for the job.

It's not like Vanterpool has ever coached for the Zards or been in the FO. He played in 22 games for them 20 years ago.

Vanterpool and Juwan Howard should be judged on their own merits...not some artificial barriers rooted in what has happened in the past.
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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#36 » by doclinkin » Thu Mar 18, 2021 6:19 pm

I like Jay Wright because I think his 4 out 1 in motion offense would be a good fit for players like Deni and Rui. The system likes face-up forwards who can handle on the attack. I get the feeling he would be good for both the confidence of both and the development of their games. Deni is not a stand in the corner and wait to shoot sort of guy. He is an offensive mismatch if a PF has to chase him to the outside. Rui too prefers to be a face-up sorta big. He's always face-up and sorta big. Both seem like they would fit in his scrambling pressing hard work defense.

I like Penny Hardaway because I can't figure out why he has top 3 best defense in the NCAA two years running despite losing his interior defenders every year. Moussa Cisse look like he may be pretty good, top 100 in rebounding and blocks, DeAndre Williams can steal the ball, is that enough? Penny was a superstar but has poise smarts and gravitas.

I like all players and coaches from the San Antonio talent tree. Asst coach Mitch Johnson is a Stanford guy who coached their G-League team to a championship, and the Spurs have always used their developmental league teams to shape their players. Becky Hammond. Tim Duncan is one of the brighter guys to have played the game, and knows how to emphasize the synergy between bigs and guards. Manu just seems to have the temperament and mindset, and was commonly a coach on the floor when he played. I have no doubt Tony Parker would be good if he decided to run a team. Though I think he wants to be a GM, and doesn't he own a Euro team?

I want a coach who has a sense of the moment, and in whom you can look at the line-ups and the bench every night and know we have a chance because the guy in that chair is both prepared and knows how to read the energy of the game. We look at the ducler line-ups to see if we have a mismatch in our favor, I'd love to be able to look at the coaching position and know night after night we have a mismatch in that seat as well.
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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#37 » by NatP4 » Thu Mar 18, 2021 6:26 pm

This is a terrific video of the 4 out 1 in motion offense in big games. Every NBA team should be running something like this, but ESPECIALLY a team with guys like Brown Jr/Avdija/Rui/Bonga/Beal/Winston. A handful of secondary playmakers that can make plays with the ball in their hands. No ball dominant players, the ball never sticks. Everyone is a passer or shooter off the catch.

Watch this and picture Rui in the role of Kris Jenkins(#2), and a guy like Neemius Queta(3 assists per 36) or Thomas Bryant in the role of Daniel Ochefu(#23)

Add in another non ball dominant guard like Suggs/Butler and good things will happen. Perfect fit.

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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#38 » by NatP4 » Thu Mar 18, 2021 6:34 pm

Last Wright post. Awesome interview with the real key piece being about needing “tough players that will battle inside while being undersized” guys like Divincenzo, Brunson, Hart all fit this description. A guy like Jalen Suggs is a textbook example of a player that would thrive under Wright.

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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#39 » by nate33 » Thu Mar 18, 2021 6:53 pm

queridiculo wrote:Sure, but sometimes you just have to take a shot before somebody else does.

How much longer should Danny Ainge have waited for Brett Stevens?

You can apply that same logic to any moderately successful college coach. Just because someone is somewhat successful in college, doesn't mean they're the next Brad Stevens. I mean, c'mon, Howard's Michigan team was just .500 last year. He has had one good season. Stevens broke the NCAA record for most wins in his first 3 years. He was the 2nd youngest coach to make an NCAA Championship game. He was the youngest coach to make it to two Final Fours. And he still had to put in 6 years as an NCAA assistant coach and 6 years as a head coach before he was hired.

The only reason Howard's resume would make anyone consider hiring him as a head coach position this summer is because he was once a star player. It's not because of his coaching track record.
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Re: Who should be the next Bullets head coach? (2021 Edition) 

Post#40 » by payitforward » Thu Mar 18, 2021 7:38 pm

I wouldn't have called Juwan a star, but I get your point. Still, I think there's something you might be missing:

Yes, of course, Juwan's past gave him the profile he has, it made people notice him. But, everybody successful does things that make people notice them. &, b/c Juwan Howard can't go back & change his past, if you factor out that past, then you're leaving the guy without anything much to recommend him.

While it's true that having been an NBA player is not a qualification to be a coach or a GM (display picture of Ernie Grunfeld), it's also worth mentioning that we tend to notice more when those guys fail -- yet, most guys fail as coaches or basketball executives, whatever their background.

Also, recall that Greg Popovich's first move as GM of the Spurs was to trade Dennis Rodman for Wil Perdue. :)

What's especially noticeable, weirdly so, is that not even success as an NBA coach is all that useful in predicting success as an NBA coach next time around. Coaches matter of course, but really most success is b/c of the players. Better players will always mean a better team. A better coach can't really make a bad player into a good one (less bad, sure... why not?).
Remember -- if you don't like the post above: blame Doc not me.

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