California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements

Moderators: zimpy27, bwgood77, BombsquadSammy, Yuri Vaultin, PockyCandy, Prez, ken6199, Dirk, Domejandro

NBAFan93
RealGM
Posts: 16,326
And1: 11,712
Joined: Dec 04, 2016

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#141 » by NBAFan93 » Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:03 pm

LKN wrote:
NBAFan93 wrote:
LKN wrote:
Students agreeing to outside contracts to sell their likeness has nothing to do with any of that.

It would be completely outside the NCAA and not impact their non-profit status.


But it would make the “professional athletes” if they can make and accept that money. Charging money to watch professional athletes competing against each other is what the NBA and NFL are...and those organizations pay taxes. It’s why it’s a big deal and it’s the crux of all this controversy.


Actually it wouldn't - you are completely misunderstanding this entire debate/discussion. Kids being allowed to earn money OFF the field/court by selling their likeness (or getting whatever job) would have nothing to do with the NCAA at all. There would be no impact on the non-profit status of the NCAA (and FWIW, somehow the NFL maintained non-profit status until a few years ago so it's not like it's that hard to keep).

https://time.com/3839164/nfl-tax-exempt-status/

You can donate your time to a non-profit organization - or even work at one and also have another job that is for-profit and it will have no impact on that non-profit organization.


I believe that article is talking about the governing/administrative body - not the teams themselves...
User avatar
LKN
Assistant Coach
Posts: 4,214
And1: 4,925
Joined: Jun 04, 2018
       

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#142 » by LKN » Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:09 pm

NBAFan93 wrote:
LKN wrote:
NBAFan93 wrote:
But it would make the “professional athletes” if they can make and accept that money. Charging money to watch professional athletes competing against each other is what the NBA and NFL are...and those organizations pay taxes. It’s why it’s a big deal and it’s the crux of all this controversy.


Actually it wouldn't - you are completely misunderstanding this entire debate/discussion. Kids being allowed to earn money OFF the field/court by selling their likeness (or getting whatever job) would have nothing to do with the NCAA at all. There would be no impact on the non-profit status of the NCAA (and FWIW, somehow the NFL maintained non-profit status until a few years ago so it's not like it's that hard to keep).

https://time.com/3839164/nfl-tax-exempt-status/

You can donate your time to a non-profit organization - or even work at one and also have another job that is for-profit and it will have no impact on that non-profit organization.


I believe that article is talking about the governing/administrative body - not the teams themselves...


What exactly do you think the NCAA is?

Again - the universities won't be paying anyone. The NCAA won't be paying anyone.

If a kid goes and does a car commercial for the local car dealer in Clemson or Tuscaloosa that has no impact on the school or the NCAA. It literally has nothing to do with them and it certainly doesn't make the kid a professional athlete
User avatar
clyde21
RealGM
Posts: 35,999
And1: 40,822
Joined: Aug 20, 2014
   

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#143 » by clyde21 » Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:10 pm

NBAFan93 wrote:
clyde21 wrote:
mademan wrote:
The overall point is simple; money and value is being created. People that are integral to the creation of said money and value not only receive no real dollar tangible remuneration for it, they are forbidden to even negotiate for it. Theyre not even allowed to make money outside of the school. Thats absolutely ridiculous


people like NBAFan93 are complicit in this fraudulent system that has been blackmailing these kids for decades...there isn't a single reasonable argument against this. none.


its actually the IRS and the non-profit tax laws that are the most complicit if you really want to place blame. There are a lot of advantages given to non-profits like education institutions, religious organizations and charities that for profit businesses and individuals do not enjoy. The fact that college athletics had been historically intertwined w/ non profit institutions is the biggest reason all this drama exists - it’s something that started long before TV deals, shoe endorsements and even the NBA/NFL. It either needs divorced from these institutions, or the IRS\Gov’t needs to give some type of exception for it. Again I see it going to the Supreme Court if this law keeps going.


what does the IRS have to do with the NCAA disallowing Zion to make money of his autograph?
NBAFan93
RealGM
Posts: 16,326
And1: 11,712
Joined: Dec 04, 2016

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#144 » by NBAFan93 » Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:17 pm

LKN wrote:
NBAFan93 wrote:
LKN wrote:
Actually it wouldn't - you are completely misunderstanding this entire debate/discussion. Kids being allowed to earn money OFF the field/court by selling their likeness (or getting whatever job) would have nothing to do with the NCAA at all. There would be no impact on the non-profit status of the NCAA (and FWIW, somehow the NFL maintained non-profit status until a few years ago so it's not like it's that hard to keep).

https://time.com/3839164/nfl-tax-exempt-status/

You can donate your time to a non-profit organization - or even work at one and also have another job that is for-profit and it will have no impact on that non-profit organization.


I believe that article is talking about the governing/administrative body - not the teams themselves...


What exactly do you think the NCAA is?

Again - the universities won't be paying anyone. The NCAA won't be paying anyone.

If a kid goes and does a car commercial for the local car dealer in Clemson or Tuscaloosa that has no impact on the school or the NCAA. It literally has nothing to do with them and it certainly doesn't make the kid a professional athlete


If someone will pay them a significant amount of money to do a car commercial, BECAUSE OF THEIR ABILITY TO PLAY A SPORT, yes - they kind of are. I mean they can try and argue they are just selected to do the role cause they are an actor on the side or just really good selling cars, but good luck with that if it goes to a committee or a program’s 501(c) status gets audited.

Remember when LeBron got in trouble for that loan to his mom for the Hummer - that wasn’t even the NCAA, but a high school league.
User avatar
LKN
Assistant Coach
Posts: 4,214
And1: 4,925
Joined: Jun 04, 2018
       

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#145 » by LKN » Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:25 pm

NBAFan93 wrote:
LKN wrote:
NBAFan93 wrote:
I believe that article is talking about the governing/administrative body - not the teams themselves...


What exactly do you think the NCAA is?

Again - the universities won't be paying anyone. The NCAA won't be paying anyone.

If a kid goes and does a car commercial for the local car dealer in Clemson or Tuscaloosa that has no impact on the school or the NCAA. It literally has nothing to do with them and it certainly doesn't make the kid a professional athlete


If someone will pay them a significant amount of money to do a car commercial, BECAUSE OF THEIR ABILITY TO PLAY A SPORT, yes - they kind of are. I mean they can try and argue they are just selected to do the role cause they are an actor on the side or just really good selling cars, but good luck with that if it goes to a committee or a program’s 501(c) status gets audited.

Remember when LeBron got in trouble for that loan to his mom for the Hummer - that wasn’t even the NCAA, but a high school league.


You are really confused here. That hummer had nothing to do with non-profit status or taxes. The controversy was over whether it violated ELIGIBILITY rules set by the OSHAA.

The only thing stopping kids from earning money from endorsements off the court are NCAA eligibility rules. There would be no impact on the NCAA or schools non-profit status unless the kids were using university owned trademarks. Obviously they would not be as the schools would not permit it (and that is not typically done for endorsements anyways).

The bolded is irrelevant and has nothing to do with the non-profit status of the NCAA or school. An audit would reflect nothing because the NCAA and school would not be involved in the student getting paid by a 3rd party in any way.

And really - you do realize companies like Nike manage to have contracts with conferences and schools and yet somehow they magically keep their non-profit status. Did you forget about Zion's shoe explosion already?
NBAFan93
RealGM
Posts: 16,326
And1: 11,712
Joined: Dec 04, 2016

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#146 » by NBAFan93 » Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:28 pm

clyde21 wrote:
NBAFan93 wrote:
clyde21 wrote:
people like NBAFan93 are complicit in this fraudulent system that has been blackmailing these kids for decades...there isn't a single reasonable argument against this. none.


its actually the IRS and the non-profit tax laws that are the most complicit if you really want to place blame. There are a lot of advantages given to non-profits like education institutions, religious organizations and charities that for profit businesses and individuals do not enjoy. The fact that college athletics had been historically intertwined w/ non profit institutions is the biggest reason all this drama exists - it’s something that started long before TV deals, shoe endorsements and even the NBA/NFL. It either needs divorced from these institutions, or the IRS\Gov’t needs to give some type of exception for it. Again I see it going to the Supreme Court if this law keeps going.


what does the IRS have to do with the NCAA disallowing Zion to make money of his autograph?


Look up what a 501c3 is - the key word is amateur sports competitions. Professional athletes competing in a 501c3 group’s games risks the 501c3 status. A dude making millions to endorse shoes cause he is a good basketball player can be argued to be a professional athlete.

This doesn’t just apply to basketball and football either - it’s a big deal in gymnastics when the Olympics roll around. Those girls need to decide if they want to take endorsement money and forego college gym/free education. Actually a lot chose the college route cause they value it more.
User avatar
clyde21
RealGM
Posts: 35,999
And1: 40,822
Joined: Aug 20, 2014
   

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#147 » by clyde21 » Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:36 pm

NBAFan93 wrote:
clyde21 wrote:
NBAFan93 wrote:
its actually the IRS and the non-profit tax laws that are the most complicit if you really want to place blame. There are a lot of advantages given to non-profits like education institutions, religious organizations and charities that for profit businesses and individuals do not enjoy. The fact that college athletics had been historically intertwined w/ non profit institutions is the biggest reason all this drama exists - it’s something that started long before TV deals, shoe endorsements and even the NBA/NFL. It either needs divorced from these institutions, or the IRS\Gov’t needs to give some type of exception for it. Again I see it going to the Supreme Court if this law keeps going.


what does the IRS have to do with the NCAA disallowing Zion to make money of his autograph?


Look up what a 501c3 is - the key word is amateur sports competitions. Professional athletes competing in a 501c3 group’s games risks the 501c3 status. A dude making millions to endorse shoes cause he is a good basketball player can be argued to be a professional athlete.

This doesn’t just apply to basketball and football either - it’s a big deal in gymnastics when the Olympics roll around. Those girls need to decide if they want to take endorsement money and forego college gym/free education. Actually a lot chose the college route cause they value it more.


it's a **** BS definition used to prevent these kids from earning money, that's all it is...just because Zion is making money on the weekends signing autographs doesn't mean he's no longer a student-athlete. **** outta here with that ****.

like i said, people like you are complicit in this nonsense for even having the audacity to defend it.
xdrta+
Starter
Posts: 2,156
And1: 1,346
Joined: Jun 18, 2018

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#148 » by xdrta+ » Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:36 pm

NBAFan93 wrote:
clyde21 wrote:
NBAFan93 wrote:
its actually the IRS and the non-profit tax laws that are the most complicit if you really want to place blame. There are a lot of advantages given to non-profits like education institutions, religious organizations and charities that for profit businesses and individuals do not enjoy. The fact that college athletics had been historically intertwined w/ non profit institutions is the biggest reason all this drama exists - it’s something that started long before TV deals, shoe endorsements and even the NBA/NFL. It either needs divorced from these institutions, or the IRS\Gov’t needs to give some type of exception for it. Again I see it going to the Supreme Court if this law keeps going.


what does the IRS have to do with the NCAA disallowing Zion to make money of his autograph?


Look up what a 501c3 is - the key word is amateur sports competitions. Professional athletes competing in a 501c3 group’s games risks the 501c3 status. A dude making millions to endorse shoes cause he is a good basketball player can be argued to be a professional athlete.


Of course it can be argued, anything can be argued. That doesn't mean it makes sense or will prevail. Look up "professional athlete" just about anywhere, and you'll find that the first and perhaps only definition is, "someone who plays sports for a living." Endorsements might be a side benefit, but they certainly don't fit the definition.
NBAFan93
RealGM
Posts: 16,326
And1: 11,712
Joined: Dec 04, 2016

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#149 » by NBAFan93 » Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:37 pm

LKN wrote:
NBAFan93 wrote:
LKN wrote:
What exactly do you think the NCAA is?

Again - the universities won't be paying anyone. The NCAA won't be paying anyone.

If a kid goes and does a car commercial for the local car dealer in Clemson or Tuscaloosa that has no impact on the school or the NCAA. It literally has nothing to do with them and it certainly doesn't make the kid a professional athlete


If someone will pay them a significant amount of money to do a car commercial, BECAUSE OF THEIR ABILITY TO PLAY A SPORT, yes - they kind of are. I mean they can try and argue they are just selected to do the role cause they are an actor on the side or just really good selling cars, but good luck with that if it goes to a committee or a program’s 501(c) status gets audited.

Remember when LeBron got in trouble for that loan to his mom for the Hummer - that wasn’t even the NCAA, but a high school league.


You are really confused here. That hummer had nothing to do with non-profit status or taxes. The controversy was over whether it violated ELIGIBILITY rules set by the OSHAA.

The only thing stopping kids from earning money from endorsements off the court are NCAA eligibility rules. There would be no impact on the NCAA or schools non-profit status unless the kids were using university owned trademarks. Obviously they would not be as the schools would not permit it (and that is not typically done for endorsements anyways).

The bolded is irrelevant and has nothing to do with the non-profit status of the NCAA or school. An audit would reflect nothing because the NCAA and school would not be involved in the student getting paid by a 3rd party in any way.

And really - you do realize companies like Nike manage to have contracts with conferences and schools and yet somehow they magically keep their non-profit status. Did you forget about Zion's shoe explosion already?


A non-profit can have a contract with a for profit company. It’s whether the athletes pros or if they are amateurs is what matters in the IRS.

The OSHAA eligibility thing all stemmed back to the same set of stuff that the NCAA does - amateur versus pro.
User avatar
LKN
Assistant Coach
Posts: 4,214
And1: 4,925
Joined: Jun 04, 2018
       

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#150 » by LKN » Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:48 pm

NBAFan93 wrote:
LKN wrote:
NBAFan93 wrote:
If someone will pay them a significant amount of money to do a car commercial, BECAUSE OF THEIR ABILITY TO PLAY A SPORT, yes - they kind of are. I mean they can try and argue they are just selected to do the role cause they are an actor on the side or just really good selling cars, but good luck with that if it goes to a committee or a program’s 501(c) status gets audited.

Remember when LeBron got in trouble for that loan to his mom for the Hummer - that wasn’t even the NCAA, but a high school league.


You are really confused here. That hummer had nothing to do with non-profit status or taxes. The controversy was over whether it violated ELIGIBILITY rules set by the OSHAA.

The only thing stopping kids from earning money from endorsements off the court are NCAA eligibility rules. There would be no impact on the NCAA or schools non-profit status unless the kids were using university owned trademarks. Obviously they would not be as the schools would not permit it (and that is not typically done for endorsements anyways).

The bolded is irrelevant and has nothing to do with the non-profit status of the NCAA or school. An audit would reflect nothing because the NCAA and school would not be involved in the student getting paid by a 3rd party in any way.

And really - you do realize companies like Nike manage to have contracts with conferences and schools and yet somehow they magically keep their non-profit status. Did you forget about Zion's shoe explosion already?


A non-profit can have a contract with a for profit company. It’s whether the athletes pros or if they are amateurs is what matters in the IRS.

The OSHAA eligibility thing all stemmed back to the same set of stuff that the NCAA does - amateur versus pro.


What in the world are you talking about? The IRS is not who determines pro/amateur status (nor do they care). The NCAA does that.

FFS - you do realize that professional athletes compete in the olympics without the USOC losing it's non-profit status right?

Where in the world are you getting this bizarre information?

The endorsement money would be paid to the athlete as part of a private 3rd party agreement... and the kid would absolutely have to pay tax on that income. However, that money would have nothing to do with the NCAA or school and would have no impact on their non-profit status.

You do realize that college coaches are paid millions of dollars AND can do endorsements right?

Stuff like this has been going on for years with no impact on non-profit status

https://www.bizjournals.com/portland/blog/threads_and_laces/2013/09/how-nike-funnels-money-football-coaches.html


Seriously, where are you getting this information? The NCAA absolutely does set rules for tax-exempt organizations, but those rules have nothing to do with things like endorsement deals unrelated to the organization.

Again - these endorsement deals would not involve the NCAA or school in any fashion. Just like Dan Marino doing commercials had nothing to do with the Dolphins or the (at the time non-profit) NFL.
User avatar
Clyde Frazier
Forum Mod
Forum Mod
Posts: 14,575
And1: 14,330
Joined: Sep 07, 2010

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#151 » by Clyde Frazier » Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:50 pm

Ballerhogger wrote:
LKN wrote:I don't understand the objections to this at all.

Look - there are actually are arguments that make sense wrt paying the players directly. It's pretty complicated (although no un-doable) and it would be tricky to come up with a system that works, preserves non-profit status, etc.

However, allowing players to sell their likeness and work however they would like off the field/court is an easy solution. Players can make money in ways that have nothing to do with the NCAA and will have no impact on them. Right now a basketball player can't even get paid to be an instructor at a camp - it's completely insane. These kids are not slaves - the NCAA has no business dictating what they do to earn money off the field/court as long as it doesn't impact their academics or play.

Players would be taxed or face tax evasion. There not getting free money they will still pay for endorsements they get


And? What's the problem?
User avatar
LKN
Assistant Coach
Posts: 4,214
And1: 4,925
Joined: Jun 04, 2018
       

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#152 » by LKN » Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:59 pm

NBAFan93 wrote:
clyde21 wrote:
NBAFan93 wrote:
its actually the IRS and the non-profit tax laws that are the most complicit if you really want to place blame. There are a lot of advantages given to non-profits like education institutions, religious organizations and charities that for profit businesses and individuals do not enjoy. The fact that college athletics had been historically intertwined w/ non profit institutions is the biggest reason all this drama exists - it’s something that started long before TV deals, shoe endorsements and even the NBA/NFL. It either needs divorced from these institutions, or the IRS\Gov’t needs to give some type of exception for it. Again I see it going to the Supreme Court if this law keeps going.


what does the IRS have to do with the NCAA disallowing Zion to make money of his autograph?


Look up what a 501c3 is - the key word is amateur sports competitions. Professional athletes competing in a 501c3 group’s games risks the 501c3 status. A dude making millions to endorse shoes cause he is a good basketball player can be argued to be a professional athlete.

This doesn’t just apply to basketball and football either - it’s a big deal in gymnastics when the Olympics roll around. Those girls need to decide if they want to take endorsement money and forego college gym/free education. Actually a lot chose the college route cause they value it more.


So how do NHL and NBA players compete in the olympics without the USOC losing it's 501c3 status?

Your entire argument is baseless. The US olympic team is filled with athletes with lucrative endorsement deals and the USOC is a 501c3

Here's a list of non-NHL guys from Sochi 2014:

How do Olympians fund their Olympic dreams? One way is out of their own pockets. According to bankrate.com, the 5 richest American Olympians at Sochi 2014, excluding professional athletes such as the NHL hockey players, are as follows:

Snowboarder Shaun White, $20M, from various endorsements and his majority share the Air & Style competitive snowboarding event.
Alpine skier Bode Miller, $8M, from endorsement deals.
Alpine skier Ted Ligety, $2M, from endorsement deals, prize money in competitions, founding ownership in Shred Optics (ski goggles, sunglass, helmets).
Snowboarder Hannah Teter, $1M, from sponsors and founding ownership in underwear line Sweet Cheeks.
Snowboarder Lindsay Jacobellis, $1M, from endorsement deals and sponsorships.
NBAFan93
RealGM
Posts: 16,326
And1: 11,712
Joined: Dec 04, 2016

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#153 » by NBAFan93 » Wed Sep 11, 2019 10:00 pm

LKN wrote:
NBAFan93 wrote:
LKN wrote:
You are really confused here. That hummer had nothing to do with non-profit status or taxes. The controversy was over whether it violated ELIGIBILITY rules set by the OSHAA.

The only thing stopping kids from earning money from endorsements off the court are NCAA eligibility rules. There would be no impact on the NCAA or schools non-profit status unless the kids were using university owned trademarks. Obviously they would not be as the schools would not permit it (and that is not typically done for endorsements anyways).

The bolded is irrelevant and has nothing to do with the non-profit status of the NCAA or school. An audit would reflect nothing because the NCAA and school would not be involved in the student getting paid by a 3rd party in any way.

And really - you do realize companies like Nike manage to have contracts with conferences and schools and yet somehow they magically keep their non-profit status. Did you forget about Zion's shoe explosion already?


A non-profit can have a contract with a for profit company. It’s whether the athletes pros or if they are amateurs is what matters in the IRS.

The OSHAA eligibility thing all stemmed back to the same set of stuff that the NCAA does - amateur versus pro.


What in the world are you talking about? The IRS is not who determines pro/amateur status (nor do they care). The NCAA does that.

FFS - you do realize that professional athletes compete in the olympics without the USOC losing it's non-profit status right?

Where in the world are you getting this bizarre information?

The endorsement money would be paid to the athlete as part of a private 3rd party agreement... and the kid would absolutely have to pay tax on that income. However, that money would have nothing to do with the NCAA or school and would have no impact on their non-profit status.

You do realize that college coaches are paid millions of dollars AND can do endorsements right?

Stuff like this has been going on for years with no impact on non-profit status

https://www.bizjournals.com/portland/blog/threads_and_laces/2013/09/how-nike-funnels-money-football-coaches.html


Seriously, where are you getting this information? The NCAA absolutely does set rules for tax-exempt organizations, but those rules have nothing to do with things like endorsement deals unrelated to the organization.

Again - these endorsement deals would not involve the NCAA or school in any fashion. Just like Dan Marino doing commercials had nothing to do with the Dolphins or the (at the time non-profit) NFL.


Then why is the NCAA against this law? Just to be mean? And the underlying schools are non-profits - believe that is the difference between the Olympics and a college, high school, etc.
Bobbymcgee
Junior
Posts: 316
And1: 165
Joined: Jul 03, 2015
 

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#154 » by Bobbymcgee » Wed Sep 11, 2019 10:03 pm

All the top H.S. recruits going to California now LOL.
User avatar
LKN
Assistant Coach
Posts: 4,214
And1: 4,925
Joined: Jun 04, 2018
       

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#155 » by LKN » Wed Sep 11, 2019 10:04 pm

NBAFan93 wrote:
LKN wrote:
NBAFan93 wrote:
A non-profit can have a contract with a for profit company. It’s whether the athletes pros or if they are amateurs is what matters in the IRS.

The OSHAA eligibility thing all stemmed back to the same set of stuff that the NCAA does - amateur versus pro.


What in the world are you talking about? The IRS is not who determines pro/amateur status (nor do they care). The NCAA does that.

FFS - you do realize that professional athletes compete in the olympics without the USOC losing it's non-profit status right?

Where in the world are you getting this bizarre information?

The endorsement money would be paid to the athlete as part of a private 3rd party agreement... and the kid would absolutely have to pay tax on that income. However, that money would have nothing to do with the NCAA or school and would have no impact on their non-profit status.

You do realize that college coaches are paid millions of dollars AND can do endorsements right?

Stuff like this has been going on for years with no impact on non-profit status

https://www.bizjournals.com/portland/blog/threads_and_laces/2013/09/how-nike-funnels-money-football-coaches.html


Seriously, where are you getting this information? The NCAA absolutely does set rules for tax-exempt organizations, but those rules have nothing to do with things like endorsement deals unrelated to the organization.

Again - these endorsement deals would not involve the NCAA or school in any fashion. Just like Dan Marino doing commercials had nothing to do with the Dolphins or the (at the time non-profit) NFL.


Then why is the NCAA against this law? Just to be mean? And the underlying schools are non-profits - believe that is the difference between the Olympics and a college, high school, etc.


You seriously are asking why the NCAA is against this law? Because right now the NCAA is the only organization that can profit on an athlete's likeness and they want to keep it that way.

The NCAA is a non-profit... in fact the NCAA and USOC are both 501c3s.

The IRS does not care about athletes getting endorsements as long as income taxes are paid.
User avatar
clyde21
RealGM
Posts: 35,999
And1: 40,822
Joined: Aug 20, 2014
   

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#156 » by clyde21 » Wed Sep 11, 2019 10:04 pm

NBAFan93 how much is the NCAA paying you to spread this nonsensical garbage?
xdrta+
Starter
Posts: 2,156
And1: 1,346
Joined: Jun 18, 2018

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#157 » by xdrta+ » Wed Sep 11, 2019 10:26 pm

NBAFan93 wrote:Then why is the NCAA against this law? Just to be mean? And the underlying schools are non-profits - believe that is the difference between the Olympics and a college, high school, etc.


You might better ask why universities are so dead-set against this bill. Well, let's see. UCLA has a $280M deal with UnderArmour; Ohio State $252M with Nike; Texas $250M with Nike; Louisville $160M with Adidas -- the list goes on and on, all built on the images of the sports stars at the schools. Is it really so outrageous that the stars should be able to sell their own image? At any rate, it's not hard to see why the schools like it the way it is.
User avatar
LKN
Assistant Coach
Posts: 4,214
And1: 4,925
Joined: Jun 04, 2018
       

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#158 » by LKN » Wed Sep 11, 2019 10:29 pm

xdrta+ wrote:
NBAFan93 wrote:Then why is the NCAA against this law? Just to be mean? And the underlying schools are non-profits - believe that is the difference between the Olympics and a college, high school, etc.


You might better ask why universities are so dead-set against this bill. Well, let's see. UCLA has a $280M deal with UnderArmour; Ohio State $252M with Nike; Texas $250M with Nike; Louisville $160M with Adidas -- the list goes on and on, all built on the images of the sports stars at the schools. Is it really so outrageous that the stars should be able to sell their own image? At any rate, it's not hard to see why the schools like it the way it is.


And yet all those deals somehow have not impacted their non-profit status..... amazing :D
NBAFan93
RealGM
Posts: 16,326
And1: 11,712
Joined: Dec 04, 2016

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#159 » by NBAFan93 » Wed Sep 11, 2019 10:35 pm

xdrta+ wrote:
NBAFan93 wrote:Then why is the NCAA against this law? Just to be mean? And the underlying schools are non-profits - believe that is the difference between the Olympics and a college, high school, etc.


You might better ask why universities are so dead-set against this bill. Well, let's see. UCLA has a $280M deal with UnderArmour; Ohio State $252M with Nike; Texas $250M with Nike; Louisville $160M with Adidas -- the list goes on and on, all built on the images of the sports stars at the schools. Is it really so outrageous that the stars should be able to sell their own image? At any rate, it's not hard to see why the schools like it the way it is.


I think those schools pay that money TO those companies for apparel?
xdrta+
Starter
Posts: 2,156
And1: 1,346
Joined: Jun 18, 2018

Re: California passes law to allow student-athletes to make money off endorsements 

Post#160 » by xdrta+ » Wed Sep 11, 2019 10:39 pm

NBAFan93 wrote:
xdrta+ wrote:
NBAFan93 wrote:Then why is the NCAA against this law? Just to be mean? And the underlying schools are non-profits - believe that is the difference between the Olympics and a college, high school, etc.


You might better ask why universities are so dead-set against this bill. Well, let's see. UCLA has a $280M deal with UnderArmour; Ohio State $252M with Nike; Texas $250M with Nike; Louisville $160M with Adidas -- the list goes on and on, all built on the images of the sports stars at the schools. Is it really so outrageous that the stars should be able to sell their own image? At any rate, it's not hard to see why the schools like it the way it is.


I think those schools pay that money TO those companies for apparel?


Seriously? You should do a little research. Those are contracts that the companies pay the schools so they can supply them with apparel. Why do you think you see the Nike swoosh on so many jerseys.

From an New York Times story from a few years ago:
U.C.L.A. and Under Armour on Tuesday announced the largest college sponsorship deal ever, a contract that will pay the university’s athletic department $280 million in cash and apparel over 15 years.

Return to The General Board