The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now

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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#21 » by Hroz » Thu Oct 10, 2019 1:37 am

Hopefully for Australia it's in the future

Simmons and one other star would do it.

Exum Maker Bolden are youngsters hoping to make a name for themselves in the NBA.

Cooks Adel Landale are guys who hopefully will hopefully join them soon

Josh Green & Matur Maker are on their way too.
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#22 » by Roy The Natural » Thu Oct 10, 2019 1:47 am

dorkestra wrote:
Roy The Natural wrote:
dorkestra wrote:
It's close enough, honestly. It's like people saying Wilmington Delaware isn't part of Philly metro, but really it is


It's not though. You don't just get to claim other county's as part of Los Angeles. Riverside is as much a suburb of Los Angeles as Orange County. In other words... It's not part of LA.


Orange County is a suburb of Los Angeles. County lines don't matter in this conversation. This is about metropolitan areas and their suburban expanse.


I've lived in southern California my entire life, other than 4 years overseas in the military. Have you even been here?

Orange County has it's own metro areas. People in Orange County don't consider downtown Los Angeles their metro area. My home in San Diego is closer to Moreno Valley than Moreno Valley is to Hollywood. I'd say that San Diego gets it's claim to Kawhi more than Los Angeles. San Diego is just as close. He played in college here, and now lives here. If the Clippers were still based in San Diego, I can pretty much guarantee they'd be at the top of his list. He bought a house in Rancho Santa Fe a couple of miles from my parents house.

Riverside doesn't even actually share a border with Los Angeles.
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#23 » by dorkestra » Thu Oct 10, 2019 1:55 am

Roy The Natural wrote:
dorkestra wrote:
Roy The Natural wrote:
It's not though. You don't just get to claim other county's as part of Los Angeles. Riverside is as much a suburb of Los Angeles as Orange County. In other words... It's not part of LA.


Orange County is a suburb of Los Angeles. County lines don't matter in this conversation. This is about metropolitan areas and their suburban expanse.


I've lived in southern California my entire life, other than 4 years overseas in the military. Have you even been here?

Orange County has it's own metro areas. People in Orange County don't consider downtown Los Angeles their metro area. My home in San Diego is closer to Moreno Valley than Moreno Valley is to Hollywood. I'd say that San Diego gets it's claim to Kawhi more than Los Angeles. San Diego is just as close. He played in college here, and now lives here. If the Clippers were still based in San Diego, I can pretty much guarantee they'd be at the top of his list. He bought a house in Rancho Santa Fe a couple of miles from my parents house.

Riverside doesn't even actually share a border with Los Angeles.


I do actually live here now and have for a number of years - nice call to authority though lol. Share a border? Are you referring to the nonsensically drawn county lines? You shouldn't read too much into that. Maybe since you lived here your whole life, your perspective of the place went a little haywire - I could see that happening.
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#24 » by Roy The Natural » Thu Oct 10, 2019 2:03 am

dorkestra wrote:
Roy The Natural wrote:
dorkestra wrote:
Orange County is a suburb of Los Angeles. County lines don't matter in this conversation. This is about metropolitan areas and their suburban expanse.


I've lived in southern California my entire life, other than 4 years overseas in the military. Have you even been here?

Orange County has it's own metro areas. People in Orange County don't consider downtown Los Angeles their metro area. My home in San Diego is closer to Moreno Valley than Moreno Valley is to Hollywood. I'd say that San Diego gets it's claim to Kawhi more than Los Angeles. San Diego is just as close. He played in college here, and now lives here. If the Clippers were still based in San Diego, I can pretty much guarantee they'd be at the top of his list. He bought a house in Rancho Santa Fe a couple of miles from my parents house.

Riverside doesn't even actually share a border with Los Angeles.


I do actually live here now and have for a number of years - nice call to authority though lol. Share a border? Are you referring to the nonsensically drawn county lines? You shouldn't read too much into that. Maybe since you lived here your whole life, your perspective of the place went a little haywire - I could see that happening.


What I'm saying, is that Riverside isn't a suburb of Los Angeles. It's not really controversial. A LOT of people commute from Riverside to Los Angeles, and A LOT of people commute from Riverside to San Diego. Someone who lives in Riverside, and commutes to San Diego for work, and lives 20 miles from the Los Angeles county line isn't living in a Los Angeles Suburb.

Like Orange County for example, there is PLENTY of work in Irvine and Santa Ana. Orange County's metro areas are within it's own county lines. Orange County is it's own hub. Which is EXACTLY WHY it is its own county. Orange County's suburbs are a direct response to the industry that popped up around UC Irvine. To consider it part of Los Angeles makes no sense by even your spurious reasoning.

Just pegging everything part of Los Angeles doesn't make any sense. Where exactly do you consider the end of Los Angeles' "suburbs?"

I mean, do we say Los Angeles is from Santa Barbara to La Jolla to Nevada? Do you have any determination of this at all? I know a TON of people from Riverside who work in North County San Diego, which makes sense because the north end of San Diego is about equidistant to much of Riverside County as the east end of Los Angeles.
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#25 » by dorkestra » Thu Oct 10, 2019 2:09 am

Roy The Natural wrote:
dorkestra wrote:
Roy The Natural wrote:
I've lived in southern California my entire life, other than 4 years overseas in the military. Have you even been here?

Orange County has it's own metro areas. People in Orange County don't consider downtown Los Angeles their metro area. My home in San Diego is closer to Moreno Valley than Moreno Valley is to Hollywood. I'd say that San Diego gets it's claim to Kawhi more than Los Angeles. San Diego is just as close. He played in college here, and now lives here. If the Clippers were still based in San Diego, I can pretty much guarantee they'd be at the top of his list. He bought a house in Rancho Santa Fe a couple of miles from my parents house.

Riverside doesn't even actually share a border with Los Angeles.


I do actually live here now and have for a number of years - nice call to authority though lol. Share a border? Are you referring to the nonsensically drawn county lines? You shouldn't read too much into that. Maybe since you lived here your whole life, your perspective of the place went a little haywire - I could see that happening.


What I'm saying, is that Riverside isn't a suburb of Los Angeles. It's not really controversial. A LOT of people commute from Riverside to Los Angeles, and A LOT of people commute from Riverside to San Diego. Someone who lives in Riverside, and commutes to San Diego for work, and lives 20 miles from the Los Angeles county line isn't living in a Los Angeles Suburb.

Like Orange County for example, there is PLENTY of work in Irvine and Santa Ana. Orange County's metro areas are within it's own county lines. Orange County is it's own hub. Which is EXACTLY WHY it is its own county.

Just pegging everything part of Los Angeles doesn't make any sense. Where exactly do you consider the end of Los Angeles' "suburbs?"

I mean, do we say Los Angeles is from Santa Barbara to La Jolla to Nevada? Do you have any determination of this at all? I know a TON of people from Riverside who work in North County San Diego, which makes sense because the north end of San Diego is about equidistant to Riverside as the east end of Los Angeles.


My uncle commuted from Philadelphia to New York his whole life on the train. I know people who live in Costa del Sol, Spain and work in London. I don't think commuting is the main point of reference. Especially since there are significant corporate campuses located near Riverside that cause people to move down there. The public school districts are some of the most competitive in the country. Riverside is too insignificant in population combined with too close in proximity to Los Angeles to not be considered a part of the greater LA region. Hell, San Diego is practically a part of the LA metro region, depending how liberal the definition.
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#26 » by Roy The Natural » Thu Oct 10, 2019 2:16 am

dorkestra wrote:
Roy The Natural wrote:
dorkestra wrote:
I do actually live here now and have for a number of years - nice call to authority though lol. Share a border? Are you referring to the nonsensically drawn county lines? You shouldn't read too much into that. Maybe since you lived here your whole life, your perspective of the place went a little haywire - I could see that happening.


What I'm saying, is that Riverside isn't a suburb of Los Angeles. It's not really controversial. A LOT of people commute from Riverside to Los Angeles, and A LOT of people commute from Riverside to San Diego. Someone who lives in Riverside, and commutes to San Diego for work, and lives 20 miles from the Los Angeles county line isn't living in a Los Angeles Suburb.

Like Orange County for example, there is PLENTY of work in Irvine and Santa Ana. Orange County's metro areas are within it's own county lines. Orange County is it's own hub. Which is EXACTLY WHY it is its own county.

Just pegging everything part of Los Angeles doesn't make any sense. Where exactly do you consider the end of Los Angeles' "suburbs?"

I mean, do we say Los Angeles is from Santa Barbara to La Jolla to Nevada? Do you have any determination of this at all? I know a TON of people from Riverside who work in North County San Diego, which makes sense because the north end of San Diego is about equidistant to Riverside as the east end of Los Angeles.


My uncle commuted from Philadelphia to New York his whole life on the train. I know people who live in Costa del Sol, Spain and work in London. I don't think commuting is the main point of reference. Especially since there are significant corporate campuses located near Riverside that cause people to move down there. The public school districts are some of the most competitive in the country. Riverside is too insignificant in population combined with too close in proximity to Los Angeles to not be considered a part of the greater LA region. Hell, San Diego is practically a part of the LA metro region, depending how liberal the definition.


See, I utterly disagree with this LA-centric take. I believe LA has city within it's own county that don't even belong to it. Thousand Oaks for example should ABSOLUTELY be a part of Ventura county.

Your take on county's and "metro" areas is just to confusing to be of practical use. Everything about Orange County screams that the county is it's own thing. It has it's own major university. It has it's own downtown areas. It has it's own base of industry. It's own entertainment.

San Diego (City, not county) has almost the same size population as Philadelphia, and La Jolla is further from Hollywood than Philadelphia is from New York. If Philadelphia is a suburb of New York, than maybe you could consider San Diego a suburb of Los Angeles. Your take just isn't backed by much logic here.
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#27 » by dorkestra » Thu Oct 10, 2019 2:26 am

Roy The Natural wrote:
dorkestra wrote:
Roy The Natural wrote:
What I'm saying, is that Riverside isn't a suburb of Los Angeles. It's not really controversial. A LOT of people commute from Riverside to Los Angeles, and A LOT of people commute from Riverside to San Diego. Someone who lives in Riverside, and commutes to San Diego for work, and lives 20 miles from the Los Angeles county line isn't living in a Los Angeles Suburb.

Like Orange County for example, there is PLENTY of work in Irvine and Santa Ana. Orange County's metro areas are within it's own county lines. Orange County is it's own hub. Which is EXACTLY WHY it is its own county.

Just pegging everything part of Los Angeles doesn't make any sense. Where exactly do you consider the end of Los Angeles' "suburbs?"

I mean, do we say Los Angeles is from Santa Barbara to La Jolla to Nevada? Do you have any determination of this at all? I know a TON of people from Riverside who work in North County San Diego, which makes sense because the north end of San Diego is about equidistant to Riverside as the east end of Los Angeles.


My uncle commuted from Philadelphia to New York his whole life on the train. I know people who live in Costa del Sol, Spain and work in London. I don't think commuting is the main point of reference. Especially since there are significant corporate campuses located near Riverside that cause people to move down there. The public school districts are some of the most competitive in the country. Riverside is too insignificant in population combined with too close in proximity to Los Angeles to not be considered a part of the greater LA region. Hell, San Diego is practically a part of the LA metro region, depending how liberal the definition.


See, I utterly disagree with this LA-centric take. I believe LA has city within it's own county that don't even belong to it. Thousand Oaks for example should ABSOLUTELY be a part of Ventura county.

Your take on county's and "metro" areas is just to confusing to be of practical use. Everything about Orange County screams that the county is it's own thing. It has it's own major university. It has it's own downtown areas. It has it's own base of industry. It's own entertainment.

San Diego has almost the same size population as Philadelphia, and La Jolla is further from Hollywood than Philadelphia is from New York. If Philadelphia is a suburb of New York, than maybe you could consider San Diego a suburb of Los Angeles. Your take just isn't backed by much logic here.


In some studies, Philly would be considered in combination with Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, though I wouldn't see any issue seeing it combined with New York.

Also it's not an LA-centric take. It's just applying common sense and realizing how close they are. Read the room this is a fun and casual thread about where people in the league came from. What's the value added here by trying to make Riverside into it's own locality? I think some people get very sensitive about their identity as formed from a specific place, but that's besides the point.
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#28 » by dodongo » Thu Oct 10, 2019 2:54 am

I think we're seeing it in a bunch of countries now too?

Like Canada and Australia most notably. Then you have Cameroon with Embiid and Siakam, Japan with Rui, Baba, and Watanabe, maybe countries like Slovenia, Latvia, etc.

And even lesser countries like mine, the Philippines, is about to experience a golden age.

With D1 or near D1 level talents in Bobby Parks, Kobe Paras, AJ Edu, Kai Sotto, Remy Martin, Dalph Panopio
Arguably the greatest era in collegiate basketball thanks in large part to tall African student-athletes
Arguably the GOAT PBA player in 6'10 Junemar Fajardo
Unfortunately a bunch of ineligibles too due to FIBA's 16 yr old passport rule including Jordan Clarkson, Stephen Holt who played in the G-League and a bunch of other D1 guys

Jalen Green is supposedly eligible, but we all know he's gonna play for USA
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#29 » by Roddy B for 3 » Thu Oct 10, 2019 3:41 am

DFW has a pretty great core for an NBA team coming up right now.

Myles Turner
LaMarcus Aldridge
Julius Randle
Marcus Smart
R.J. Hampton
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#30 » by TheRealKaboom » Thu Oct 10, 2019 4:08 am

The city of Los Angeles has more combined college/professional sports championships than any city on the continent. More than New York City, more than all of the cities in the entire state of Texas combined.

But the current Lakers, Dodgers & Rams haven't won anything yet. Until those teams start winning titles again, there's no Golden Age in L.A. Those teams need to start living up to the expectations people from L.A. have for their local sports teams.

And reading through some of the posts here, anyone who thinks Palmdale, Riverside, or Moreno Valley are in any way part of Los Angeles is either a transplant from somewhere else or an outsider.
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#31 » by Kabookalu » Thu Oct 10, 2019 4:35 am

dorkestra wrote:
Roy The Natural wrote:
dorkestra wrote:
Orange County is a suburb of Los Angeles. County lines don't matter in this conversation. This is about metropolitan areas and their suburban expanse.


I've lived in southern California my entire life, other than 4 years overseas in the military. Have you even been here?

Orange County has it's own metro areas. People in Orange County don't consider downtown Los Angeles their metro area. My home in San Diego is closer to Moreno Valley than Moreno Valley is to Hollywood. I'd say that San Diego gets it's claim to Kawhi more than Los Angeles. San Diego is just as close. He played in college here, and now lives here. If the Clippers were still based in San Diego, I can pretty much guarantee they'd be at the top of his list. He bought a house in Rancho Santa Fe a couple of miles from my parents house.

Riverside doesn't even actually share a border with Los Angeles.


I do actually live here now and have for a number of years - nice call to authority though lol. Share a border? Are you referring to the nonsensically drawn county lines? You shouldn't read too much into that. Maybe since you lived here your whole life, your perspective of the place went a little haywire - I could see that happening.


This conversation has thrown me in a loop. So what claim does Los Angeles have over surrounding cities, because of how the amount of "city" doesn't end? Genuine question, because I once lived in the middle of Ontario where there'd be one small city of 30 000 (mine was 200 000), and then there'd be miles and miles and miles of farmland between everything, so it was easy distinguishing each city from each other, that is up until you get up to Toronto, and there's debate on whether Niagara Falls is Toronto or its own city. Southern Californian is such a unique beast and I was culture shocked when I first moved here, because realistically if you removed borders and geographical lines then the area from San Diego to Santa Barbara and Lancaster could be its own city (we don't want anything to do with Bakersfield). I've had a lot of conversations with people about LA and what actually is LA, because as far as I know, other than I guess DTLA, there isn't a singular city called "Los Angeles," like how there isn't a "Hollywood." There's East LA and West Hollywood, though not an original version of those cities per se.

It's always been an interesting discussion for me since no one I've spoken to about it can ever agree on one thing. I've concluded for myself that Los Angeles is more of an "idea" you could say. There are people that draw the line on identity, like some people from Torrance don't think of themselves as LA because the culture there is different, but that's as much true with Venice folk as it does with West Ho and the DTLA people (specifically the inhabitants of Arts District).
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#32 » by ClipsFanSince98 » Thu Oct 10, 2019 4:52 am

50CalClips wrote:
NBAFan93 wrote:Huh? You mean LA born players who play for LA teams, or LA players in the league?

I mean isn’t Kawhi from San Diego and PG from an hour outside of LA?

I know Westbrook and Harden are literally from LA, but they play for the Rockets.


Born or Raised... "Home Town" players.

Kawhi attended San Diego State University, and lives there now, but he's from Compton/Moreno Valley (a suburb of L.A.)
Lol dude Moreno Valley is a ghetto ass town in Inland Empire, not LA. Pretty sure it's San Bernardino or Riverside county.
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#33 » by Cactus Jack » Thu Oct 10, 2019 5:00 am

Doug Christie
Michael Dickerson
Jason Terry
Jamal Crawford
Brandon Roy
Nate Robinson
Martell Webster
Marvin Williams
Spencer Hawes
Isaiah Thomas
Avery Bradley

No NBA team
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#34 » by TheDoors24 » Thu Oct 10, 2019 5:01 am

Roy The Natural wrote:
dorkestra wrote:
Roy The Natural wrote:
As far as I know Riverside isn't part Los Angeles.


It's close enough, honestly. It's like people saying Wilmington Delaware isn't part of Philly metro, but really it is


It's not though. You don't just get to claim other county's as part of Los Angeles. Riverside is as much a suburb of Los Angeles as Orange County. In other words... It's not part of LA.


Lol. I get what your saying but honestly you say riverside and it’s pretty try much close enough to la that many outside just consider it la. Lol.

But if you live in the area yeah it’s about 30/50 minute drive depending where you live. But that’s a lot of places since it’s all so spread out.
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#35 » by KIRAG » Thu Oct 10, 2019 5:30 am

Cactus Jack wrote:Doug Christie
Michael Dickerson
Jason Terry
Jamal Crawford
Brandon Roy
Nate Robinson
Martell Webster
Marvin Williams
Spencer Hawes
Isaiah Thomas
Avery Bradley

No NBA team


Isn't Zach Lavine from there too?
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#36 » by dorkestra » Thu Oct 10, 2019 5:42 am

Kabookalu wrote:
dorkestra wrote:
Roy The Natural wrote:
I've lived in southern California my entire life, other than 4 years overseas in the military. Have you even been here?

Orange County has it's own metro areas. People in Orange County don't consider downtown Los Angeles their metro area. My home in San Diego is closer to Moreno Valley than Moreno Valley is to Hollywood. I'd say that San Diego gets it's claim to Kawhi more than Los Angeles. San Diego is just as close. He played in college here, and now lives here. If the Clippers were still based in San Diego, I can pretty much guarantee they'd be at the top of his list. He bought a house in Rancho Santa Fe a couple of miles from my parents house.

Riverside doesn't even actually share a border with Los Angeles.


I do actually live here now and have for a number of years - nice call to authority though lol. Share a border? Are you referring to the nonsensically drawn county lines? You shouldn't read too much into that. Maybe since you lived here your whole life, your perspective of the place went a little haywire - I could see that happening.


This conversation has thrown me in a loop. So what claim does Los Angeles have over surrounding cities, because of how the amount of "city" doesn't end? Genuine question, because I once lived in the middle of Ontario where there'd be one small city of 30 000 (mine was 200 000), and then there'd be miles and miles and miles of farmland between everything, so it was easy distinguishing each city from each other, that is up until you get up to Toronto, and there's debate on whether Niagara Falls is Toronto or its own city. Southern Californian is such a unique beast and I was culture shocked when I first moved here, because realistically if you removed borders and geographical lines then the area from San Diego to Santa Barbara and Lancaster could be its own city (we don't want anything to do with Bakersfield). I've had a lot of conversations with people about LA and what actually is LA, because as far as I know, other than I guess DTLA, there isn't a singular city called "Los Angeles," like how there isn't a "Hollywood." There's East LA and West Hollywood, though not an original version of those cities per se.

It's always been an interesting discussion for me since no one I've spoken to about it can ever agree on one thing. I've concluded for myself that Los Angeles is more of an "idea" you could say. There are people that draw the line on identity, like some people from Torrance don't think of themselves as LA because the culture there is different, but that's as much true with Venice folk as it does with West Ho and the DTLA people (specifically the inhabitants of Arts District).



It would be like planets and moons in solar systems. The greater the size and cultural influence of the city, the more force it exerts on the surrounding cities.
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#37 » by Cactus Jack » Thu Oct 10, 2019 6:03 am

KIRAG wrote:
Cactus Jack wrote:Doug Christie
Michael Dickerson
Jason Terry
Jamal Crawford
Brandon Roy
Nate Robinson
Martell Webster
Marvin Williams
Spencer Hawes
Isaiah Thomas
Avery Bradley

No NBA team


Isn't Zach Lavine from there too?

Yup. Bothell, WA.
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#38 » by Roy The Natural » Thu Oct 10, 2019 6:11 am

dorkestra wrote:
Kabookalu wrote:
dorkestra wrote:
I do actually live here now and have for a number of years - nice call to authority though lol. Share a border? Are you referring to the nonsensically drawn county lines? You shouldn't read too much into that. Maybe since you lived here your whole life, your perspective of the place went a little haywire - I could see that happening.


This conversation has thrown me in a loop. So what claim does Los Angeles have over surrounding cities, because of how the amount of "city" doesn't end? Genuine question, because I once lived in the middle of Ontario where there'd be one small city of 30 000 (mine was 200 000), and then there'd be miles and miles and miles of farmland between everything, so it was easy distinguishing each city from each other, that is up until you get up to Toronto, and there's debate on whether Niagara Falls is Toronto or its own city. Southern Californian is such a unique beast and I was culture shocked when I first moved here, because realistically if you removed borders and geographical lines then the area from San Diego to Santa Barbara and Lancaster could be its own city (we don't want anything to do with Bakersfield). I've had a lot of conversations with people about LA and what actually is LA, because as far as I know, other than I guess DTLA, there isn't a singular city called "Los Angeles," like how there isn't a "Hollywood." There's East LA and West Hollywood, though not an original version of those cities per se.

It's always been an interesting discussion for me since no one I've spoken to about it can ever agree on one thing. I've concluded for myself that Los Angeles is more of an "idea" you could say. There are people that draw the line on identity, like some people from Torrance don't think of themselves as LA because the culture there is different, but that's as much true with Venice folk as it does with West Ho and the DTLA people (specifically the inhabitants of Arts District).



It would be like planets and moons in solar systems. The greater the size and cultural influence of the city, the more force it exerts on the surrounding cities.


Except if you're from here... you understand that people from LA have this grandiose idea of LA, and don't realize that it is sort of a shithole. Not a single county around LA wants anything to do with LA. Make your way south of Camp Pendleton and ask people from San Diego what they think about LA. Pure animosity. San Diego culture is also MARKEDLY different than LAs. It's like Boston vs New York level culture differences and animosity.
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#39 » by hoosierdaddy34 » Thu Oct 10, 2019 6:26 am

Umm no it isn’t. 1988 was the Golden Age for LA. Both the Lakers and Dodgers won world titles, both in classic final series. USC and UCLA were #1 and #2 in college football led by Troy Aikman and Rodney Peete. Bo Jackson was going crazy for the LA Raiders. Rams made the playoffs. UCLA basketball made the tournament. The great one Wayne Gretzky joined the Kings and they went on a deep playoff run. That was an amazing time to be in LA.
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Re: The "Golden Generation" of your City/State/Country? For L.A. its now 

Post#40 » by Coeur » Thu Oct 10, 2019 6:42 am

Roy The Natural wrote:
dorkestra wrote:
Roy The Natural wrote:
What I'm saying, is that Riverside isn't a suburb of Los Angeles. It's not really controversial. A LOT of people commute from Riverside to Los Angeles, and A LOT of people commute from Riverside to San Diego. Someone who lives in Riverside, and commutes to San Diego for work, and lives 20 miles from the Los Angeles county line isn't living in a Los Angeles Suburb.

Like Orange County for example, there is PLENTY of work in Irvine and Santa Ana. Orange County's metro areas are within it's own county lines. Orange County is it's own hub. Which is EXACTLY WHY it is its own county.

Just pegging everything part of Los Angeles doesn't make any sense. Where exactly do you consider the end of Los Angeles' "suburbs?"

I mean, do we say Los Angeles is from Santa Barbara to La Jolla to Nevada? Do you have any determination of this at all? I know a TON of people from Riverside who work in North County San Diego, which makes sense because the north end of San Diego is about equidistant to Riverside as the east end of Los Angeles.


My uncle commuted from Philadelphia to New York his whole life on the train. I know people who live in Costa del Sol, Spain and work in London. I don't think commuting is the main point of reference. Especially since there are significant corporate campuses located near Riverside that cause people to move down there. The public school districts are some of the most competitive in the country. Riverside is too insignificant in population combined with too close in proximity to Los Angeles to not be considered a part of the greater LA region. Hell, San Diego is practically a part of the LA metro region, depending how liberal the definition.


Your take on county's and "metro" areas is just to confusing to be of practical use. Everything about Orange County screams that the county is it's own thing. It has it's own major university. It has it's own downtown areas. It has it's own base of industry. It's own entertainment.

That’s true. They have their own baseball team. The Los Angeles Angels

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