Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two

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Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#1 » by BombsquadSammy » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:17 am

PART ONE https://forums.realgm.com/boards/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=1934034#p81270039

R.I.P. to a titan of basketball, and sincere respects to his family and to all who have been affected by today's heart-rending tragedy.

We're here to discuss the positive legacy of an accomplished sportsman and to mourn the loss of nine lives, including multiple children. Remember that many of us can relate to shocking, world-shattering tragedies such as this one, and that today's events hit very close to home for some of us. Accordingly, be sensitive and respectful in your discussion.

Some reminders for this thread:

- No discussion of Kobe's past indiscretions or legal issues

- No inappropriate jokes

- No cheap talk and generalisations about racism and rape

- No links to or posts of alleged crash footage




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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#2 » by Swish1906 » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:19 am

The "technical" side of the flight...watched the channel several times in the past, never thought because of such things like today.

Bad weather/fog and helicopters are a terrible mix...

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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#3 » by Drygon » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:19 am

It's absolute crazy how someone predicted this outcome 8 years ago..

Read on Twitter


And he looks devastated going by his tweets...

Spoiler:
Read on Twitter


Read on Twitter


Read on Twitter


Read on Twitter


Read on Twitter
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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#4 » by TinmanZBoy » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:21 am

Kobe is one of my favorite players, always thought he is more skillful than MJ, well I am on his side in that debate... but what impressed me even more is his career and life after NBA... won an Oscar, being a dedicated dad... thought this guy is just the winner of winners, is immortally winning... this tragedy just shows life is so fragile... what hit me hardest is his lovely Daughter was also dead in the accident... I think this is absolute a nightmare for any parents... RIP Kobe, God bless! I am forever a fan of you.
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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#5 » by alienswon » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:21 am

https://www.tmz.com/

4:30 PM PT -- L.A. weather was extremely foggy Sunday morning, and law enforcement sources tell us even LAPD air support was grounded because of it. Flight tracker data shows Kobe's chopper appeared to first encounter weather issues as it was above the L.A. Zoo. It circled that area at least 6 times at a very low altitude -- around 875 feet -- perhaps waiting for the fog to clear.

We know the pilot contacted the control tower at Burbank Airport around 9:30 AM PT, and the tower was aware the pilot had been circling for about 15 minutes. The pilot eventually headed north along the 118 freeway before turning to the west, and started following above the 101 freeway around Woodland Hills, CA.

At around 9:40 AM they encounter more weather -- as in seriously heavy fog -- and the chopper turned south. This was critical, because they turned toward a mountainous area. The pilot suddenly and rapidly climbed from about 1200 feet up to 2000 feet.

However, moments later -- around 9:45 AM -- they flew into a mountain at 1700 feet. Flight tracker data shows they were flying at about 161 knots.
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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#6 » by CBS7 » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:22 am

I want Shaq, MJ, Phil, Pau, and LeBron doing his speech for him for his HOF induction. Any other names that make more sense?
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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#7 » by HoopsterJones » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:22 am

I cannot believe this newscaster Alison Morris, said a racial slur by mistake instead of Lakers. Like how?

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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#8 » by Repeat 3-peat » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:23 am

Good stuff BombsquadSammy to end the first thread on page #81.
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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#9 » by alienswon » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:23 am

on the tweet about the copter

i can't find the tweet on this, but someone already said this guy just back-dated the tweet. So that he can generate views/hits so don't spread this as he is trying to take advantage of the situation.
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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#10 » by alienswon » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:24 am

queridiculo wrote:
CIB24 wrote:I understand that they were flying low for visibility and the pilot was not necessarily relying on instrumentation to determine where he was. The radar shows they rose almost 1000 feet in the final few seconds of the flight suggesting the pilot recognised they were about to hit the mountain and tried to pull up as hard as he could. They hit the hillside at over 160 knots (185mph). Due to the fog I don't think anyone but the pilot knew what was happening until the final few seconds of the flight. Given the impact at such a high velocity I believe everyone aboard died instantly, and were not alive while the aircraft and surrounding bush was burning.

Terrible and to think common sense by the pilot (i.e. not to fly) could have saved their lives.


This is a pretty comprehensive article on what the pilot may have encountered what the weather conditions were close to the crash site.

https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2020/01/kobe-bryants-helicopter-likely-succumbed-to-common-danger.html

Sadly it looks like the pilot erred in judging the conditions which ultimately led to pilot error.



here it is

At takeoff a few minutes after 9 a.m., the weather was marginal, with a solid overcast at 1,300 feet and visibility of about five miles in a thin haze. The pilot was flying according to “Visual Flight Rules,” or VFR, meaning that he was relying on his ability to see the terrain below him, and hence had to stay below the clouds. As an alternative, he could have contacted air traffic controllers and switched to “Instrument Flight Rules,” or IFR, that would have allowed him to climb up through the clouds. Controllers would have given him a series of waypoints to follow that would keep him well clear of terrain, dangerous weather, and other aircraft. Flying IFR, however, is time-consuming and constrains pilots to following the directions of controllers. “Southern California airspace is extremely busy, and they might tell you to wait an hour,” assistant professor of aviation at the City University of New York Paul Cline told me. “You’re just one of many waiting in line, and it doesn’t matter if you’re Kobe Bryant.”

So the helicopter continued under visual flight rules. According to data transmitted continuously by the plane’s transponder, it climbed to an altitude of 800 feet as it headed to the northwest near its top speed of 178 mph. For the next 12 minutes, it sped over the inland sprawl of Orange County, past former citrus groves that had long ago been repurposed as warehouses and strip malls. It left the beach enclave of Huntington Beach to the left, and Disneyland to the right, as it worked its way north and west, drawing ever closer to the east-west range of hills, the Santa Monica Mountains, which define the northern end of Los Angeles proper and shelter the city’s most storied redoubts: Beverly Hills, the Hollywood Hills, Malibu.

As he skirted downtown L.A. — and the stadium where Bryant had spent the entirety of his 20-year career — the pilot picked up Highway 5, one of the state’s main arteries, and followed it north to Glendale, a sort of gateway between L.A. proper and the San Fernando Valley to the north. To the left, the peaks of the Santa Monica Mountains disappeared into the clouds; to the right rose the Verdugo Hills. Low-level aviation in the greater L.A. area is constrained by the mountains and the passes that cut through them. Fortunately for pilots navigating by sight, the major highways also make use of these passes, so in a pinch a disoriented pilot can find his way through by following the traffic. There’s an old joke that “IFR” stands for “I Follow Roads.”

But before Bryant’s helicopter could enter the San Fernando Valley, it had to wait. Directly ahead lay Burbank Airport, surrounded by an invisible cylinder of airspace 10 nautical miles across that cannot be entered without permission from air traffic control. Here, near Griffith Park, the helicopter slowed and started a series of turns to the left. After 11 minutes, permission to proceed came through, and the helicopter accelerated as it resumed its northward track over the 5.

Five minutes later, the helicopter reached the edge of Burbank’s airspace. As the 5 turned north on its way to the Bay Area, the helicopter kept straight, then followed a long curve to the left that carried it around the northern half of the San Fernando Valley to skirt the busy airspace around Van Nuys Airport.

At 9:42 a.m., the helicopter intercepted the Ventura Freeway near the southwestern corner of the San Fernando Valley. To the left, the rectilinear sprawl gave way to the wooded slopes of the Santa Monica Mountains and Malibu beyond. Straight ahead, the freeway climbed and zigzagged as it negotiated the higher terrain that led to Thousand Oaks. The journey was almost at an end: the Mamba Sports Academy lay just 17 miles to the west.

For the first time, though, the helicopter was no longer flying over the flat expanse of dense urban Los Angeles. Here, at the suburban fringes, the terrain was hilly and climbing. To make matters worse, the canyon that stretched to the south has a tendency to funnel in the maritime fog. That morning, said Calabasas resident Sharon Stepanosky — who lives less than a mile from the crash site and who happens, coincidentally, to be my cousin — a thick fog had lain over the area, with visibility no more than a few hundred feet. “It was completely overcast and visibility was not good,” she said. By 9:45 a.m., rising temperatures had driven away the fog from the majority of the town, but thick low clouds still wrapped around the slopes just a few hundred feet higher.

As the helicopter approached Calabasas, it was less than 500 feet above the ground. Perhaps wanting to put a safety margin between himself and the increasingly hilly terrain, the pilot began a brisk climb, ascending nearly 1,000 feet in 36 seconds. This put it very close to the bottom of the cloud layer reported at that time at nearby Van Nuys Airport.

We may never know for sure if the helicopter had indeed entered the clouds. But if it did, then it had crossed a kind of invisible line. It was now engaged in what air-crash investigators call “continued VFR flight into instrument meteorological conditions.” Basically, a pilot dependent on seeing the ground to stay oriented can no longer see the ground. Amid a sudden whiteout, disorientation can come surprisingly quickly. “When you get in the soup, your senses don’t work,” Cline, the aviation professor, said. “For me, I always feel like I’m falling to the right. Other people might feel like they’re falling to the left, or climbing.”

A trained pilot can stay right-side up by paying attention to the instruments on his panel. But at low altitude over Calabasas, Bryant’s pilot also had another problem. He knew that the ground ahead was rising, and he couldn’t see it. To avoid hitting it, he could keep climbing, and hope that he’d gain altitude faster than the ground underneath him. Or he could slow to a stop and descend vertically until he popped out of the bottom of the cloud.

Instead, it seems likely that the pilot apparently executed a common maneuver: Figuring that the bottom of the cloud must be close at hand, he decided to dive and pull a fast 180 to go back out the way he’d come in.

According to data transmitted by its transponder, at 15 seconds past 9:45 a.m., the helicopter banked to the left, then dove. Eighteen seconds later, it had lost 800 feet and returned to an easterly heading. But what the pilot had failed to reckon with is that the ground rose not only straight ahead, but on the sides as well. The S-76B had impacted a hillside above the Las Virgenes Municipal Water District facility at a speed of 170 mph.

To be clear, this scenario is just one possibility. “I can’t stress enough, we do not know what happened,” said Cline. It’s possible, he acknowledges, that the plane suddenly developed a mechanical problem that forced it down. Still, he can’t help but be haunted by the idea that if Bryant’s pilot had decided to fly IFR, he and his passengers would still be alive.

“A ton of rules come into play, and people don’t always want to fly that way. It takes away their ability to do whatever they want to do,” Cline said. “The trade-off is you get to live.”
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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#11 » by Lazy Faizy » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:24 am

Is anyone else still in shock over this? The news broke about 8 hours ago and I'm still in utter disbelief. We lost a legend today. It'll take a while for myself and the rest of the sports world to get over this.

RIP to Kobe, his daughter and the rest of the victims. Today is truly a sad day for us all.
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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#12 » by Repeat 3-peat » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:24 am

CBS7 wrote:I want Shaq, MJ, Phil, Pau, and LeBron doing his speech for him for his HOF induction. Any other names that make more sense?


Maybe family?
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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#13 » by John Murdoch » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:24 am

That game winner in the Phoenix series game 6 is just running thru my head ..just the balls he had is what will always get my respect
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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#14 » by Stone » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:27 am

I still can’t believe he’s gone....
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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#15 » by Young Stapler » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:27 am

I've been extremely touched by everything you guys have shared about Kobe and just hearing about some of your lives and how basketball or different players has impacted you all.
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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#16 » by Drygon » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:27 am

alienswon wrote:
Drygon wrote:It's absolute crazy how someone predicted this outcome 8 years ago..

Read on Twitter





i can't find the tweet on this, but someone already said this guy just back-dated the tweet. So that he can generate views/hits so don't spread this as he is trying to take advantage of the situation.


App did exist in webOS those years, but for Android it came later, and the source label just keep updated with the lastest version on webOS

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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#17 » by SK21209 » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:27 am

The part that gets me is everyone in the media who knew him going on TV today and saying it seemed like he was the happiest he’s ever been.
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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#18 » by Hindenburg » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:28 am

RIP to a legend and a worldwide icon
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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#19 » by Illmatic12 » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:28 am

I’m probably not the only one in my age demographic who feels this way.. but when I have children “Kobe” and “Bryant” will almost certainly be used in their government names somewhere and I won’t hear otherwise, lol .

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Re: Kobe Bryant Discussion, Part Two 

Post#20 » by Black Watch » Mon Jan 27, 2020 2:29 am

Wow. This is really sad. I feel bad now for all the times I debated the merits of his career...

Really puts into perspective what's important.

What a tragedy... R.I.P. Kobe
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