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LP sees the big picture with Hawks young core

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Re: LP sees the big picture with Hawks young core 

Post#101 » by Jamaaliver » Fri Jun 12, 2020 3:42 pm

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Trae Young is already one of the NBA's most talented and impactful offensive players. In addition to being ninth in the league in offensive box plus/minus this season, Young's 6.3 OBPM is the third-best mark of all time for a sophomore (Luka Doncic and LeBron James are Nos. 1 and 2, respectively).

John Collins is off to an excellent start to his NBA career as well. The third-year big man averaged 21.6 points and 10.1 rebounds in 33.2 minutes this season. Among the 342 times in NBA history that a player averaged at least 20 points and 10 rebounds, Collins' 2019-20 true shooting percentage ranks fourth (behind three Charles Barkley seasons).

And though Kevin Huerter, De'Andre Hunter and Cam Reddish have all shown flashes of potential, none of them are sure things. That makes their offseason development crucial.

Shooting should probably be the top priority for both Hunter and Reddish, as they were both far below the league-average mark for TS%. Huerter also needs to figure out how to get to the line. Among the 96 players who took at least 610 shots this season, Huerter's free-throw-attempt rate ranks 94th.


The draft will be important for the Hawks, too. Atlanta will have a 12.5 percent shot at the No. 1 pick and a 48.1 percent chance for a top-four pick. While this year's draft appears to lack franchise-changing talent at the top, the Hawks could find another promising complementary piece to plug in alongside Young and Collins.

If the Hawks are allowed to convene before the 2020-21 season begins, they'll also need to work on offensive sets for a frontcourt that includes both Collins and Clint Capela. The latter didn't fit the Houston Rockets' micro-ball philosophy, but he remains one of the game's more dynamic pick-and-roll weapons.

Alongside Young, a top-tier lob passer, Capela should continue to feast at the rim. And with Collins' expanding perimeter game (he shot 40.1 percent from three on 3.6 attempts per night), the paint shouldn't become too crowded.

Atlanta doesn't get to participate in the fun at Disney World, but plenty of excitement remains around this young core.
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Re: LP sees the big picture with Hawks young core 

Post#102 » by Jamaaliver » Fri Jun 12, 2020 5:58 pm

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Re: LP sees the big picture with Hawks young core 

Post#103 » by Spud2nique » Sat Jun 13, 2020 12:19 am

Jamaaliver wrote:
Read on Twitter


I agree.

Others close:

Ja/Jjj
Zion+whoever
Luka+Zinger (I don’t fear zinger the way I did before tho)
Booker+ Ayton
Jokic+Murray
AngelMasterLucky11 :wink:
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Re: LP sees the big picture with Hawks young core 

Post#104 » by Jamaaliver » Sun Jun 14, 2020 5:11 pm

Sekou Smith wrote:Atlanta Hawks enter offseason with growing up in mind

The Atlanta Hawks enter the offseason with growing up in mind and faith in All-Star Trae Young and a 'core five' of young players

The Hawks have obvious offseason goals, including adding depth to a young and still-developing roster while also focusing on the growth and development of a 'core five' that includes All-Star guard Trae Young, big man John Collins, wing player Kevin Huerter and rookies Cam Reddish and De'Andre Hunter.

Young is already a star, having been voted in as an All-Star starter in his second NBA season. Collins played at another level when he returned to action after serving a 25-game suspension for violating the league's anti-drug policy. Huerter, Hunter and Reddish all flashed signs of being building blocks, too.

That 'core five' doesn't include veteran center Clint Capela (who was acquired via Houston on February 5 but never suited up because of a foot injury) and rookie center Bruno Fernando. Those seven players will serve as the backbone of the team Atlanta fields once the 2020-21 season begins.

Spoiler:
Coach Lloyd Pierce is tasked with ensuring that group shows up to autumn training camp locked in on that growth mindset he is stressing. It is also what makes whatever the next phase of this offseason rebuilding plan crucial.

Pierce praised the development of Atlanta's young core and changes to the roster. He is also grateful for the veteran leadership and presence Capela and big man Dewayne Dedmon bring.

"We are extremely encouraged and excited about the guys that we have," Pierce said. "So we are on the path we have been talking about for a long time, building through the Draft and adding some veteran leadership and then, you know, looking forward what we will be able to do with our cap space and free agency over the next two summers is really encouraging.

Schlenk echoed Pierce's sentiments about the growth of the young core dating back to Collins' rookie season in 2017-18. The Hawks have also maintained their cap flexibility and draft assets, which sets them up for a bright future. But he also acknowledged the uncertainty surrounding this unprecedented offseason comes with concerns.

All told, the Hawks cannot afford an extended layoff that could stunt the continued growth of their youth.

"I think that is obviously a concern," Schlenk said. "One of the most important things for our guys is to continue to play. So being able to play in the summer - you know, pick-up games or Summer League's obviously not going to happen this year. All those things are important for young guys as they continue to get better."
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Re: LP sees the big picture with Hawks young core 

Post#105 » by HMFFL » Mon Jun 15, 2020 1:27 pm

Jamaaliver wrote:Nearly 2 years later, do most Hawks fans still see this pairing as the long term future in the backcourt?

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Coach wants Kevin to be more aggressive and I believe that needs to happen for him to be a Hawk longterm. When Trae sat with an injury Kevin was more of a focal point so we'll see how he approaches the game next season.

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Re: LP sees the big picture with Hawks young core 

Post#106 » by HMFFL » Mon Jun 15, 2020 1:28 pm

Jamaaliver wrote:
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I like the confidence!
I'm already excited for next season and this off-season that is months from now.

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Re: LP sees the big picture with Hawks young core 

Post#107 » by jayu70 » Tue Jun 23, 2020 3:36 pm

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1. Trae Young, G | 21 years old | Three years, $21.2 million. Last year team option

2019-20 stats: 29.6 points, 4.3 rebounds, 9.3 assists, 1.1 steals, 43.7/36.1/86.0

Simply put, Young has developed into one of the most creative offensive forces in the NBA, regardless of age. The elite-level skill and production he showcased at Oklahoma — where he led the NCAA in both scoring and assists — have translated at basically the same level.  The individual numbers Young achieved in 2019-20 are pretty mind-boggling.He averaged 29.6 points and 9.3 assists on a pretty ridiculous 59.5 true-shooting percentage. The players who posted at least that many points per game total on that level of efficiency? It’s a veritable set of Hall of Famers that sprinkle the NBA’s all-time elite. Try these names on for size: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Giannis Antetokounmpo, Larry Bird, Stephen Curry, Adrian Dantley, Kevin Durant, George Gervin, James Harden, LeBron James, Michael Jordan, Karl Malone, Bob McAdoo, Shaquille O’Neal and Kiki VanDeWeghe.


2. John Collins, F | 22 years old | Two years, $6.8 million

2019-20 stats: 21.6 points, 10.1 rebounds, 1.5 assists, 1.6 blocks, 58.3/40.1/80.0

Similar to Young, Collins is something of a controversial building block because of his incredible offensive production and very real defensive question marks. Let’s start on that offense, though, because I’m not sure enough people have recognized just how intriguing Collins is on that end. There is a lot of Amar’e Stoudemire here to Young’s Steve Nash impression.

Collins is 22 and he’s coming off of a season in which he averaged 21.6 points and 10.1 rebounds on an obscene 65.9 true-shooting percentage. Similar to Young, his productivity has been genuinely special for his age. The list of players to have done what Collins did this year isn’t exactly long. It’s Collins and Charles Barkley. Heck, even reduce that down to 21 points and 10 rebounds on a 60 true-shooting percentage and you get Barkley and Collins with Kareem, Shaq, Karl-Anthony Towns, Moses Malone, Anthony Davis, Giannis, Dwight Howard, David Robinson, Karl Malone, Artis Gilmore and Wilt Chamberlain. That’s pretty outrageous for someone this young.


Spoiler:
3. Cam Reddish, W | 20 years old | Four years, $19.3 million, last two years team option

2019-20 stats: 10.5 points, 3.5 rebounds, 1.5 assists, 1.1 steals, 38.4/33.2/80.2

Reddish had a fascinating year. He started the season getting a ton of minutes, but unfortunately was performing pretty darn close to unplayable during those minutes for the first half. And really, it’s not a massive surprise that there would be early struggles. Reddish was long seen as one of the elite prospects in his age group.

4. Kevin Huerter, W | 21 years old | Three years, $9.7 million, last year team option

2019-20 stats: 12.2 points, 4.1 rebounds, 3.8 assists, 41.3/38.0/82.8

It’s difficult to evaluate Huerter’s second season. He had an early-season knee injury that held him out of training camp, then a shoulder injury that held him out for the start of the year, and then he dealt with various hip and groin injuries that gave him discomfort as he tried to play through them. It’s probably not unfair to sort of throw this season away from a developmental standpoint.

At the end of the day, Huerter had basically the same season as a sophomore as he did as a rookie. Honestly, given everything he went through, that speaks well of him. He averaged 14 points per 36 minutes a year after averaging 12.8. He saw very minimal increases across the board in terms of rebounds and assists. His true-shooting percentage was 53.6 as a rookie, and 53.9 as a sophomore. His assist rate and turnover rate was very similar. Basically, Huerter was the same floor-spacing, smart decision-making, perimeter-oriented 2-guard. Plus, if you take his averages from Jan. 1 onward, after he took December to readjust coming back from his shoulder injury, you might come away thinking this was a slight step forward. In that time, he averaged nearly 14 points per game while shooting 40 percent from 3, and averaged 4.6 rebounds and 4.1 assists.

5.  De’Andre Hunter, W/F | 22 years old | Four years, $32.1 million, last two years team option

2019-20 stats: 12.3 points, 4.5 rebounds, 1.8 assists, 41.0/35.5/76.4

Hunter’s rookie season was weird, and yet his value was likely as expected. The weirdness came from his strengths entering the draft not totally bearing themselves out. However, his potential flaws were figured out in a real, tangible way that inspires some confidence long-term. Overall, Hunter established himself as a solid, steady rotational player, having played more minutes this season than any other rookie in the league.

But things weren’t perfect. Leaving Virginia after being the best player on a national title team, Hunter was renowned for his defensive ability. At 6-foot-8 with a 7-foot-2 wingspan, he was a switchable monster capable of taking on a real variety of tough defensive assignments. At the collegiate level, he was one of the best on-ball defenders I’ve evaluated in a while, and did his job rotationally off the ball on defense despite not forcing a ton of turnovers. But with the Hawks this season, while he took on a wide variety of defensive assignments, he wasn’t quite as effective as expected. Maybe too much was asked, and it’s unfair to compare him to Reddish, who stood out on that end. But Hunter was basically the average to above-average rookie defensive wing, struggling a bit to adjust to the increased pace and speed of the NBA game. He knew where to be, but often got beat.







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Re: LP sees the big picture with Hawks young core 

Post#108 » by Radioblacktive1 » Tue Jun 23, 2020 7:46 pm

Man...we really shouldn’t have given up all those picks for Hunter
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Re: LP sees the big picture with Hawks young core 

Post#109 » by graymule » Wed Jun 24, 2020 11:42 am

:D
All of us, except for Travis, have forgotten all about Skal Labissiere. Like our coming draft pick, we don't really know how they will fit with our young crew. Just two more of our crew !!

:D
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Re: LP sees the big picture with Hawks young core 

Post#110 » by jayu70 » Thu Jun 25, 2020 3:15 pm

NBA Rookie Scale Prospects Ranking: The top 50 prospects

5 Hawks in top 50
5. Trae Young | 21 years old | Atlanta Hawks

2019-20 stats: 29.6 points, 4.3 rebounds, 9.3 assists, 1.1 steals, 43.7/36.1/86.0

Simply put, Young has developed into one of the most creative offensive forces in the NBA, regardless of age. … He averaged 29.6 points and 9.3 assists on a pretty ridiculous 59.5 true-shooting percentage. The players who posted at least that many points per game total on that level of efficiency? It’s a veritable set of Hall of Famers, guys who sprinkle the NBA’s all-time elite. Try these names on for size: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Giannis Antetokounmpo, Larry Bird, Stephen Curry, Adrian Dantley, Kevin Durant, George Gervin, James Harden, LeBron James, Michael Jordan, Karl Malone, Bob McAdoo, Shaquille O’Neal, and Kiki Vandeweghe. That’s 14 guys, 13 of whom are Hall of Famers or future Hall of Famers, plus Vandeweghe, who did it in one of the insanely uptempo Doug Moe seasons in Denver, where the Nuggets posted a pace that was absurdly nine possessions above the league average per game. And the number of players to post that scoring combination while also averaging nine assists? How about just Young this season and Harden in 2017? … To complain about what he’s accomplished at this point would be missing the forest for the trees.

20. John Collins, F | 22 years old | Atlanta Hawks

2019-20 stats: 21.6 points, 10.1 rebounds, 1.5 assists, 1.6 blocks, 58.3/40.1/80.0

Similarly to Young, Collins is something of a controversial building block due to his incredible offensive production and very real defensive question marks. Let’s start on that offense, though, because I’m not sure enough people have recognized just how intriguing Collins is on that end. There is a lot of Amar’e Stoudemire here to Young’s Steve Nash impression. Collins is 22 and he’s coming off of a season in which he averaged 21.6 points and 10.1 rebounds on an obscene 65.9 true-shooting percentage. His productivity has been genuinely special for his age. The list of players to have done what Collins did this year isn’t exactly long. It’s Collins and Charles Barkley. Heck, even reduce that down to 21 points and 10 rebounds on a 60 true-shooting percentage and you get Barkley and Collins with Kareem, Shaq, Karl-Anthony Towns, Moses Malone, Anthony Davis, Giannis, Dwight Howard, David Robinson, Karl Malone, Artis Gilmore and Wilt Chamberlain. That’s pretty outrageous for someone this young.



Spoiler:
28. Cam Reddish, W | 20 years old | Atlanta Hawks

2019-20 stats: 10.5 points, 3.5 rebounds, 1.5 assists, 1.1 steals, 38.4/33.2/80.2

Reddish had a fascinating year. He started the season getting a ton of minutes, but unfortunately was performing pretty darn close to unplayable during those minutes for the first half. And really, it’s not a massive surprise that there would be early struggles. … Off the bat, I thought Reddish was actually pretty solid on defense. … The bigger questions came on offense early on. Reddish went through a disastrous, prolonged shooting slump to begin his career, the likes of which I can’t really remember from a top 10 pick. Through his first 32 games (basically the entirety of the 2019 portion of the season), he shot a terrible 31.8 percent from the field and 26 percent from 3. His assist-to-turnover ratio was quite negative. Everything looked like it was moving way too fast for him. … But then a funny thing happened: Reddish started to figure things out. He looked a lot more comfortable on the court. The shot didn’t look as sped up and it started falling at a rate more commensurate with how clean his mechanics look.

36. Kevin Huerter, W | 21 years old | Atlanta Hawks

2019-20 stats: 12.2 points, 4.1 rebounds, 3.8 assists, 41.3/38.0/82.8

It’s difficult to evaluate Huerter’s second season. He had an early season knee injury that held him out of training camp, then a shoulder injury that held him out for the start of the year, and then he dealt with various hip and groin injuries that gave him discomfort as he tried to play through them. It’s probably not unfair to sort of throw this season away from a developmental standpoint. … Above all, he remains a monster shooter off the catch. Among the 162 players league wide to take at least 100 catch-and-shoot shots, Huerter was 14th in terms of efficiency with a 64.3 effective field goal percentage, and again that came in a year where he navigated a shoulder injury that held him to 32.4 percent from 3 in December as he played his way back into shape. Huerter is going to develop into one of the league’s elite level shooters. Like the kind of shooter who has a chance to win a 3-point contest someday.

39. De’Andre Hunter, W/F | 22 years old | Atlanta Hawks

2019-20 stats: 12.3 points, 4.5 rebounds, 1.8 assists, 41.0/35.5/76.4

Hunter’s rookie season was weird, and yet his value was likely as expected. The weirdness came from his strengths entering the draft not totally bearing themselves out. However, his potential flaws were figured out in a real, tangible way that inspires some confidence long-term. Overall, Hunter established himself as a solid, steady rotational player, having played more minutes this season than any other rookie in the league … while I think the defense was slightly worse than I expected, his offense was better. Hunter hit 35.5 percent from 3 on nearly five attempts per game, which is a great starting point for him as a rookie on such high volume. In the last decade, only 10 other rookies have made that percentage on at least 300 attempted 3s, and the only really questionable long-term shooter among the players on that list is Kyle Kuzma. There is a real track record for guys who experience this type of success early on.


https://theathletic.com/1860883/2020/06/25/nba-rookie-scale-prospects-ranking-the-top-50-prospects/
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Re: LP sees the big picture with Hawks young core 

Post#111 » by shakes0 » Thu Jun 25, 2020 8:41 pm

jayu70 wrote:NBA Rookie Scale Prospects Ranking: The top 50 prospects

5 Hawks in top 50
5. Trae Young | 21 years old | Atlanta Hawks

2019-20 stats: 29.6 points, 4.3 rebounds, 9.3 assists, 1.1 steals, 43.7/36.1/86.0

Simply put, Young has developed into one of the most creative offensive forces in the NBA, regardless of age. … He averaged 29.6 points and 9.3 assists on a pretty ridiculous 59.5 true-shooting percentage. The players who posted at least that many points per game total on that level of efficiency? It’s a veritable set of Hall of Famers, guys who sprinkle the NBA’s all-time elite. Try these names on for size: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Giannis Antetokounmpo, Larry Bird, Stephen Curry, Adrian Dantley, Kevin Durant, George Gervin, James Harden, LeBron James, Michael Jordan, Karl Malone, Bob McAdoo, Shaquille O’Neal, and Kiki Vandeweghe. That’s 14 guys, 13 of whom are Hall of Famers or future Hall of Famers, plus Vandeweghe, who did it in one of the insanely uptempo Doug Moe seasons in Denver, where the Nuggets posted a pace that was absurdly nine possessions above the league average per game. And the number of players to post that scoring combination while also averaging nine assists? How about just Young this season and Harden in 2017? … To complain about what he’s accomplished at this point would be missing the forest for the trees.

20. John Collins, F | 22 years old | Atlanta Hawks

2019-20 stats: 21.6 points, 10.1 rebounds, 1.5 assists, 1.6 blocks, 58.3/40.1/80.0

Similarly to Young, Collins is something of a controversial building block due to his incredible offensive production and very real defensive question marks. Let’s start on that offense, though, because I’m not sure enough people have recognized just how intriguing Collins is on that end. There is a lot of Amar’e Stoudemire here to Young’s Steve Nash impression. Collins is 22 and he’s coming off of a season in which he averaged 21.6 points and 10.1 rebounds on an obscene 65.9 true-shooting percentage. His productivity has been genuinely special for his age. The list of players to have done what Collins did this year isn’t exactly long. It’s Collins and Charles Barkley. Heck, even reduce that down to 21 points and 10 rebounds on a 60 true-shooting percentage and you get Barkley and Collins with Kareem, Shaq, Karl-Anthony Towns, Moses Malone, Anthony Davis, Giannis, Dwight Howard, David Robinson, Karl Malone, Artis Gilmore and Wilt Chamberlain. That’s pretty outrageous for someone this young.



Spoiler:
28. Cam Reddish, W | 20 years old | Atlanta Hawks

2019-20 stats: 10.5 points, 3.5 rebounds, 1.5 assists, 1.1 steals, 38.4/33.2/80.2

Reddish had a fascinating year. He started the season getting a ton of minutes, but unfortunately was performing pretty darn close to unplayable during those minutes for the first half. And really, it’s not a massive surprise that there would be early struggles. … Off the bat, I thought Reddish was actually pretty solid on defense. … The bigger questions came on offense early on. Reddish went through a disastrous, prolonged shooting slump to begin his career, the likes of which I can’t really remember from a top 10 pick. Through his first 32 games (basically the entirety of the 2019 portion of the season), he shot a terrible 31.8 percent from the field and 26 percent from 3. His assist-to-turnover ratio was quite negative. Everything looked like it was moving way too fast for him. … But then a funny thing happened: Reddish started to figure things out. He looked a lot more comfortable on the court. The shot didn’t look as sped up and it started falling at a rate more commensurate with how clean his mechanics look.

36. Kevin Huerter, W | 21 years old | Atlanta Hawks

2019-20 stats: 12.2 points, 4.1 rebounds, 3.8 assists, 41.3/38.0/82.8

It’s difficult to evaluate Huerter’s second season. He had an early season knee injury that held him out of training camp, then a shoulder injury that held him out for the start of the year, and then he dealt with various hip and groin injuries that gave him discomfort as he tried to play through them. It’s probably not unfair to sort of throw this season away from a developmental standpoint. … Above all, he remains a monster shooter off the catch. Among the 162 players league wide to take at least 100 catch-and-shoot shots, Huerter was 14th in terms of efficiency with a 64.3 effective field goal percentage, and again that came in a year where he navigated a shoulder injury that held him to 32.4 percent from 3 in December as he played his way back into shape. Huerter is going to develop into one of the league’s elite level shooters. Like the kind of shooter who has a chance to win a 3-point contest someday.

39. De’Andre Hunter, W/F | 22 years old | Atlanta Hawks

2019-20 stats: 12.3 points, 4.5 rebounds, 1.8 assists, 41.0/35.5/76.4

Hunter’s rookie season was weird, and yet his value was likely as expected. The weirdness came from his strengths entering the draft not totally bearing themselves out. However, his potential flaws were figured out in a real, tangible way that inspires some confidence long-term. Overall, Hunter established himself as a solid, steady rotational player, having played more minutes this season than any other rookie in the league … while I think the defense was slightly worse than I expected, his offense was better. Hunter hit 35.5 percent from 3 on nearly five attempts per game, which is a great starting point for him as a rookie on such high volume. In the last decade, only 10 other rookies have made that percentage on at least 300 attempted 3s, and the only really questionable long-term shooter among the players on that list is Kyle Kuzma. There is a real track record for guys who experience this type of success early on.


https://theathletic.com/1860883/2020/06/25/nba-rookie-scale-prospects-ranking-the-top-50-prospects/


can you post the rest of the list for those of us who don't want to give the Athletic any money? I'd like to know who they had above Trae. Obviously Luka and Zion, but who are the other 2?
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Re: LP sees the big picture with Hawks young core 

Post#112 » by Nathan2331 » Thu Jun 25, 2020 10:13 pm

shakes0 wrote:
jayu70 wrote:NBA Rookie Scale Prospects Ranking: The top 50 prospects

5 Hawks in top 50
5. Trae Young | 21 years old | Atlanta Hawks

2019-20 stats: 29.6 points, 4.3 rebounds, 9.3 assists, 1.1 steals, 43.7/36.1/86.0

Simply put, Young has developed into one of the most creative offensive forces in the NBA, regardless of age. … He averaged 29.6 points and 9.3 assists on a pretty ridiculous 59.5 true-shooting percentage. The players who posted at least that many points per game total on that level of efficiency? It’s a veritable set of Hall of Famers, guys who sprinkle the NBA’s all-time elite. Try these names on for size: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Giannis Antetokounmpo, Larry Bird, Stephen Curry, Adrian Dantley, Kevin Durant, George Gervin, James Harden, LeBron James, Michael Jordan, Karl Malone, Bob McAdoo, Shaquille O’Neal, and Kiki Vandeweghe. That’s 14 guys, 13 of whom are Hall of Famers or future Hall of Famers, plus Vandeweghe, who did it in one of the insanely uptempo Doug Moe seasons in Denver, where the Nuggets posted a pace that was absurdly nine possessions above the league average per game. And the number of players to post that scoring combination while also averaging nine assists? How about just Young this season and Harden in 2017? … To complain about what he’s accomplished at this point would be missing the forest for the trees.

20. John Collins, F | 22 years old | Atlanta Hawks

2019-20 stats: 21.6 points, 10.1 rebounds, 1.5 assists, 1.6 blocks, 58.3/40.1/80.0

Similarly to Young, Collins is something of a controversial building block due to his incredible offensive production and very real defensive question marks. Let’s start on that offense, though, because I’m not sure enough people have recognized just how intriguing Collins is on that end. There is a lot of Amar’e Stoudemire here to Young’s Steve Nash impression. Collins is 22 and he’s coming off of a season in which he averaged 21.6 points and 10.1 rebounds on an obscene 65.9 true-shooting percentage. His productivity has been genuinely special for his age. The list of players to have done what Collins did this year isn’t exactly long. It’s Collins and Charles Barkley. Heck, even reduce that down to 21 points and 10 rebounds on a 60 true-shooting percentage and you get Barkley and Collins with Kareem, Shaq, Karl-Anthony Towns, Moses Malone, Anthony Davis, Giannis, Dwight Howard, David Robinson, Karl Malone, Artis Gilmore and Wilt Chamberlain. That’s pretty outrageous for someone this young.



Spoiler:
28. Cam Reddish, W | 20 years old | Atlanta Hawks

2019-20 stats: 10.5 points, 3.5 rebounds, 1.5 assists, 1.1 steals, 38.4/33.2/80.2

Reddish had a fascinating year. He started the season getting a ton of minutes, but unfortunately was performing pretty darn close to unplayable during those minutes for the first half. And really, it’s not a massive surprise that there would be early struggles. … Off the bat, I thought Reddish was actually pretty solid on defense. … The bigger questions came on offense early on. Reddish went through a disastrous, prolonged shooting slump to begin his career, the likes of which I can’t really remember from a top 10 pick. Through his first 32 games (basically the entirety of the 2019 portion of the season), he shot a terrible 31.8 percent from the field and 26 percent from 3. His assist-to-turnover ratio was quite negative. Everything looked like it was moving way too fast for him. … But then a funny thing happened: Reddish started to figure things out. He looked a lot more comfortable on the court. The shot didn’t look as sped up and it started falling at a rate more commensurate with how clean his mechanics look.

36. Kevin Huerter, W | 21 years old | Atlanta Hawks

2019-20 stats: 12.2 points, 4.1 rebounds, 3.8 assists, 41.3/38.0/82.8

It’s difficult to evaluate Huerter’s second season. He had an early season knee injury that held him out of training camp, then a shoulder injury that held him out for the start of the year, and then he dealt with various hip and groin injuries that gave him discomfort as he tried to play through them. It’s probably not unfair to sort of throw this season away from a developmental standpoint. … Above all, he remains a monster shooter off the catch. Among the 162 players league wide to take at least 100 catch-and-shoot shots, Huerter was 14th in terms of efficiency with a 64.3 effective field goal percentage, and again that came in a year where he navigated a shoulder injury that held him to 32.4 percent from 3 in December as he played his way back into shape. Huerter is going to develop into one of the league’s elite level shooters. Like the kind of shooter who has a chance to win a 3-point contest someday.

39. De’Andre Hunter, W/F | 22 years old | Atlanta Hawks

2019-20 stats: 12.3 points, 4.5 rebounds, 1.8 assists, 41.0/35.5/76.4

Hunter’s rookie season was weird, and yet his value was likely as expected. The weirdness came from his strengths entering the draft not totally bearing themselves out. However, his potential flaws were figured out in a real, tangible way that inspires some confidence long-term. Overall, Hunter established himself as a solid, steady rotational player, having played more minutes this season than any other rookie in the league … while I think the defense was slightly worse than I expected, his offense was better. Hunter hit 35.5 percent from 3 on nearly five attempts per game, which is a great starting point for him as a rookie on such high volume. In the last decade, only 10 other rookies have made that percentage on at least 300 attempted 3s, and the only really questionable long-term shooter among the players on that list is Kyle Kuzma. There is a real track record for guys who experience this type of success early on.


https://theathletic.com/1860883/2020/06/25/nba-rookie-scale-prospects-ranking-the-top-50-prospects/


can you post the rest of the list for those of us who don't want to give the Athletic any money? I'd like to know who they had above Trae. Obviously Luka and Zion, but who are the other 2?
Jayson Tatum and Ben Simmons

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