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2021 NBA Draft Scouting

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Jamaaliver
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Re: 2021 NBA Draft Scouting 

Post#61 » by Jamaaliver » Wed Apr 7, 2021 1:26 pm

CP War Hawks wrote:Davion Mitchell would be incredible behind Trae. He's destined to be picked a few spots in latter parts of the lotto.


Yeah. That young man has been very impressive all season and especially this tourney.

Sam Vecenie wrote:Davion Mitchell, G, Baylor (No. 11):

...I don’t think there has been a more improved player across the country this season than Mitchell. Honestly, given the intel on him, it makes sense. Baylor’s staff has been universally complimentary of Mitchell for the entire time he’s been there, noting how elite his work ethic is. He just doesn’t stop working to get better. Ultimately, the result is that he’s the best player on the second-best team in America. He’s on his way to winning the national Defensive Player of the Year award, a genuinely elite point-of-attack disruptor who will make an impact as a defender in the NBA from Day 1. But I think his offense has gone underrated. The shooting improvement has gotten plaudits, but I’m still somewhat skeptical of that.

What I’m not skeptical of is his athletic burst. He can get into the paint and attack the basket with ease. Now, he’s not an awesome finisher and will need to work on his craft there to reach his ceiling. But Mitchell is the kind of two-way player who is still on an upward trajectory that also fits squarely into an important role in the NBA as a point guard who can defend and play both with or without the ball. This is just such an easy role fit, and I wouldn’t be so quick as to dismiss upside beyond just being a complementary player.
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Re: 2021 NBA Draft Scouting 

Post#62 » by Jamaaliver » Today 12:26 am

Scouting reports on guard prospects we might pursue.

Grading Every Top 2021 NBA Draft Prospect in Each Key Category

Tre Mann (Florida, PG/SG, Sophomore)
Spoiler:


Scoring: A-
Tre Mann's breakout was evident early, but it escalated in March. He averaged 21.2 points on 55.2 percent shooting over Florida's last five games.

For the season, he was one of the nation's top ball-screen scorers (88th percentile). Defenses had difficulty containing his shiftiness. He excelled creating and making shots off the dribble from every level. His floater also developed into a valuable weapon (20-of-43).
Mann did have trouble scoring off the ball, though he didn't spend much time spotting up or cutting.

Shooting: A-
Pull-up shooting elevated Mann's scoring attack. He shot 40.3 percent on dribble jumpers, many coming from behind the arc, where he made 1.9 threes per game at a 40.2 percent clip.

Playmaking: B
Mann only averaged 3.5 assists to 2.8 turnovers, a ratio that raises questions about whether he's suited for a lead-guard role. He showcased playmaking skill, grading in the 87th percentile as a pick-and-roll passer. Mann set teammates up off his creativity, but he also looked for his own shot more.

Defense: B+
Mann made defensive reads and effort plays he didn't make as a freshman. He raised his steal percentage (2.4 percent) and lowered his foul rate (from 4.1 to 2.9 per 40 minutes).

Impact: A-
Mann emerged as a leader and floor general for Florida after Keyontae Johnson's departure from the lineup early in the season. The team leaned heavily on Mann's ability to create and shot-make, and he delivered, particularly during the postseason tournaments.
Jaden Springer (Tennessee, PG/SG, Freshman)
Spoiler:


Scoring: B
Jaden Springer transitioned to more of an off-ball role at Tennessee compared to what he was used to at IMG. He adjusted well, averaging 12.5 points on 46.7 percent shooting, grading in the 70th percentile as a spot-up player and capitalizing in transition for a total of 108 points in 25 games.
He patiently picked his spots on the attack, leading to a 59.3 percent finishing clip at the rim. Despite lacking explosiveness, Springer has tremendous body control and balance. He uses deceleration well to separate on drives.
However, he shot a combined 8-of-35 between his ball-screen and isolation possessions. Concerns exist about Springer's ability to create his own offense against a set defense.

Shooting: B+
Smart shot selection was key in Springer's efficiency. He didn't take many threes, but he made 20 of 46 attempts. He wasn't as effective shooting off the dribble (28.2 percent). Altogether, he made just 32 half-court jumpers, so scouts figure to pay close attention to his shot during workouts.

Playmaking: B
Springer was only used in 25 pick-and-roll ball-handling possessions all season. When he did facilitate, it was mostly off spot-up drives, and he showed promising passing instincts and vision when penetrating (2.9 assists per game). But scouts question whether he has enough burst to break down defenses, a limitation that lowers his playmaking potential.

Defense: A
Solid defensively, Springer got low in his stance and used his length and strong legs to deny dribble penetration. NBA coaches should see a combo who can guard both backcourt spots.

Impact: A-
Springer was second on a veteran team in box plus/minus (first offensively). He was Tennessee's best player during multiple conference wins at 18 years old. With a cool demeanor, he demonstrated veteran poise, and Tennessee fans and coaches knew what they were getting from their freshman every game.
Davion Mitchell (Baylor, PG, Junior)
Spoiler:


Scoring: B+
Suddenly a lottery prospect, Davion Mitchell improved his draft stock without scoring more than 16 points during Baylor's six-game March Madness stretch. Scoring isn't his biggest selling point. But he did help his cause with scouts, delivering flashes of explosiveness attacking the basket and nifty step-back moves into dribble jumpers.
For the year, Mitchell shot 60.5 percent at the rim and 51.3 percent out of isolation. He developed into a three-level threat and sharper shot-creator compared to last season.

Shooting: A
Mitchell made a huge jump as a shooter, connecting on 44.7 percent of his threes and 43.6 percent on his pull-ups. He shot 43.5 percent off the catch while playing with another ball-handler in Jared Butler, a promising sign for his potential to work from either backcourt position at the next level.
But he only shot 65.2 percent on free throws, which raises some red flags about the legitimacy of his out-of-nowhere three-point improvement.

Playmaking:A-
Mitchell was turnover-prone and occasionally forced the issue as a passer. But he also looked more like a true playmaker this year, finishing with 5.5 assists per game. Viewed more as a combo last year, Mitchell now has NBA scouts picturing a point guard.

Defense: A+
Scouts thought Mitchell was the nation's best perimeter defender. Opponents turned the ball over a whopping 29.6 percent of the time when he was guarding them man-to-man. His strength, quickness and snapping hands led to a 3.3 steal percentage and caused problems for opposing ball-handlers all season.

Impact: A
Butler was Baylor's best overall player, but Mitchell was clearly a driving force behind the national championship run. Aside from his production and defense, his energy and intensity seemed to elevate the team.
Bleacher Report

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