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Prospect Spotlight -- Tyrese Haliburton

Moderators: HMFFL, dms269, Jamaaliver

Is Ty Haliburton worth a lottery selection for our Hawks?

No way we're spending a top-10 pick on another PG
2
17%
Yes! The defense, shooting & playmaking are a perfect fit
7
58%
Maybe. Depends on who else is still available
3
25%
 
Total votes: 12

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Re: Prospect Spotlight -- Tyrese Haliburton 

Post#81 » by Spud2nique » Fri Sep 25, 2020 6:11 am

Jamaaliver wrote:
2020 NBA Draft Big Board: Latest Top 80 Rankings

4. Tyrese Haliburton, G, Iowa State | Sophomore


Height: 6' 5" | Weight: 175 | Age: 20 | Previous Rank: 4

Although nearly everything about Haliburton’s game is unorthodox, his advanced on-court intellect, winning-conducive skill set and rapid trajectory are noteworthy, and they set him apart in some regard in a lottery where the talent gap between prospects is admittedly narrow. It’s easy to harp on the holes in his game—arduous shooting mechanics, unremarkable explosiveness, and a still-developing handle that could keep him from being a full-time point guard—but there’s a chance that those weaknesses are effectively masked by his savant-like approach to greasing the wheels of an offense. Haliburton doesn’t actually need to be a full-time point guard to wind up as one of the best players in this draft, and at worst, he profiles as a highly usable bench piece on a winning team. His real value lies in what his presence does for everyone else on his team, as a ball-moving facilitator who hits open threes and can augment any lineup.
SI.com


Sounds kind of like what Herro is doing in Miami. Straight up ballin out with no signs of slowing down anytime soon. Wouldn’t mind Hali and definitely want him for GM and the high ft%. :wink:
GO HAWKS!!! :thumbsup:
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Re: Prospect Spotlight -- Tyrese Haliburton 

Post#82 » by Jamaaliver » Mon Sep 28, 2020 3:58 pm

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Re: Prospect Spotlight -- Tyrese Haliburton 

Post#83 » by Jamaaliver » Tue Sep 29, 2020 3:32 pm

NBA Draft targets for the Spurs: Tyrese Haliburton

What could the breakout Iowa State star bring to San Antonio?

In a draft class full of role-players, Tyrese Haliburton has set himself apart as a premium passing talent. And though a left wrist fracture put a premature end to his breakout sophomore campaign, let’s take a look at what the Iowa State point guard might bring to a crowded Hawks backcourt.

Tyrese Haliburton | Sophomore | Point Guard

Height: 6’5’’ Weight: 175 lbs Wingspan: 6’7.5’’

Per Game: 15.2 PPG/5.9 RPG/6.5 APG/2.5 SPG/0.7 BPG

Shooting Splits: .504 FG%/.419 3P%/.822 FT

Offense
Spoiler:
Tyrese Haliburton is one of the older lottery prospects in the 2020 Draft Class. Regardless, the sophomore point guard out of Iowa State University is one of the smartest and most NBA ready players at his position. A quick decision-maker with elite court vision, Haliburton is one of the best distributors entering the league. Skip, lob, swing, and pocket passes are all part of his polished live-dribble repertoire, and he is particularly dangerous as a pick-and-roll facilitator. While Tyrese isn’t as aggressive operating out of half-court sets, the six-five floor general is most confident and creative when pushing the pace in transition, manipulating the defense with his eyes.

Although an undoubtedly talented passer, Haliburton isn’t much of a threat to create for himself. Limited by relatively average ball-handling, the stringy guard rarely displayed many advanced moves, and he isn’t someone who looks to put combinations dribbles together to shake his man. Instead, Haliburton mostly relies on hesitations and ball, body, and head fakes to create space.

As far as scoring the ball, Haliburton is more likely to look for a teammate than attack. Despite his slight frame, the 175-pound guard showed proficiency finishing at the rim, though he took a surprisingly low volume of attempts from this range. A fluid athlete with a solid first step, long strides, sneaky pop, and a feathery-soft touch, Tyrese utilized change of pace with exceptional body control to convert around the basket, and a package of floaters and runners helped keep defenders guessing. Nevertheless, he only averaged 2.2 free throws per 40 minutes...

While some scouts question Haliburton’s long-distance jumper, I buy into it translating in the NBA. Strange foot placement, unorthodox form, and a face-level release aside, his set shooting motion is quick, consistent, and Haliburton proved to be an elite stand-still shooter with legitimate range throughout his college career (42.6% on 237 3PA). That being said, his mechanics really begin to break down when shooting off the dribble...though he likely has a bit of functionality shooting off screens, I’m not sure Haliburton will ever become a reliable motion shooter.


Defense
Spoiler:
Haliburton is one of the more underrated defenders in the 2020 Draft Class, and while his spindly build doesn’t allow for much switchability, his outstanding team defense would be a welcome addition to [any team]. He showed sound defensive awareness and instincts as a help-side defender in the NCAA, always communicating with teammates and routinely making correct rotations. He seldom ball-watched and was continuously engaged even when not directly involved in the action.

I would categorize Tyrese as more of a disciplined risk-taker than an all-out gambler, but that certainly didn’t stop him from being a defensive playmaker and menace in the passing lanes. His wingspan is listed at six-seven-and-a-half on the official NBA website, though it has been rumored to be as long as seven feet, and the latter wouldn’t shock me considering how often he got his hands on the ball. Haliburton averaged 2.5 steals and nearly one block per game as a sophomore. He frequently turned defense into offensive opportunities, though sometimes closed out too hard, exposing driving lanes. And while he won’t be a rim-protector in the NBA, he may be able to slide over from the weak-side to disrupt shots at the rim with his length.

Despite being an instrumental glue-guy as a team defender, Haliburton will probably be limited as an isolation defender. He is much too thin to effectively switch onto threes, fours, and fives, and heavier ones and twos won’t have much trouble displacing him on drives. The sophomore guard has swift feet and fluid hips, though he has a tendency to play upright, leaving himself susceptible to being caught off-balance.
Tyrese Haliburton should provide an immediate boost to any defense, but for all his strengths, there are a few weaknesses he must shore up to become more impactful on this end. Pick-and-roll defense is still a major flaw of his up to this point, and his previously noted slenderness made it easier for him to be hampered by screens. And once faced with the screen, he didn’t do the best job of fighting through the contact to get back into the play...his body type isn’t conducive to packing on muscle, so becoming better at feeling and navigating screens should be a top priority.
Spurs -- SB nation
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Re: Prospect Spotlight -- Tyrese Haliburton 

Post#84 » by Jamaaliver » Thu Oct 1, 2020 1:24 am

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Re: Prospect Spotlight -- Tyrese Haliburton 

Post#85 » by _s_t_u_r_t_ » Fri Oct 2, 2020 9:56 pm

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Ingram likely signs with NOP, and if not NOP, likely NYK.

Dipo, if the opinions of IND fans on RealGM are any measure (not a lot of confidence in that, but it's all we have to go on, right?), would cost far more than is reasonable.

Lonzo is an option, but then again...

Tyrese, though inexperienced at this level and though suffering a knee injury to end his season, provides essentially the same if not better than Lonzo at both ends of the court... and costs so much less, and thus provides some added free agency flexibility given his rookie contract status.

I've come full circle. For now anyhow. Grab Tyrese.
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Re: Prospect Spotlight -- Tyrese Haliburton 

Post#86 » by graymule » Sat Oct 3, 2020 6:02 pm

:D

Haliburton to the Hawks! Yes! I still have hopes that this happens.

:D :D
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Re: Prospect Spotlight -- Tyrese Haliburton 

Post#87 » by Jamaaliver » Sun Oct 4, 2020 4:12 pm

Haliburton is the most “pure” point guard [of the projected lottery picks]. In something that has to be highlighted especially in this class because of how much it struggled with decent and efficient production, Haliburton posted 15.2 points, 5.9 rebounds, 6.5 assists and 2.5 steals per game for the Cyclones in 36.7 minutes a game.

He’s not much of an explosive athlete and it’s a bummer that a 6-foot-5 point guard with great length doesn’t do much scoring around the rim or get to the foul line. But a lot of Haliburton’s talents are accentuating, from his catch-and-shoot numbers at three-point range (42.6% on all 3s at 4.2 attempts per game over two seasons) to his off-ball defense.

“Right away I think I’m coming in as a guy who can make shots and somebody who can facilitate at a high level and I think I’m a really good off-ball defender,” Haliburton said Wednesday. “I think my IQ is very high and I know where to be at the right time … I think right away you get those three things.”

Haliburton acknowledged his weaknesses, looking to get better as an on-ball defender and as a scorer off the dribble with his finishing, specifically mentioning how the NBA is mostly a pick-and-roll game now.

He even highlighted how plenty of NBA defenses (including in the playoffs) have employed drop coverage, meaning the big man will sag below the screen and allow the guard to shoot from three if it’s there. Haliburton was beaming while saying that because all he saw was aggressive hedges and traps at Iowa State.
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Re: Prospect Spotlight -- Tyrese Haliburton 

Post#88 » by Jamaaliver » Tue Oct 6, 2020 7:12 pm

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Re: Prospect Spotlight -- Tyrese Haliburton 

Post#89 » by Jamaaliver » Fri Oct 16, 2020 5:15 pm

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Re: Prospect Spotlight -- Tyrese Haliburton 

Post#90 » by Jamaaliver » Yesterday 8:05 pm

The most intriguing player in the NBA draft: Iowa State's Tyrese Haliburton

If you’re a casual basketball fan, chances are you did not see Haliburton play last season. The fact that he averaged 15.2 points, 6.5 assists, 5.9 rebounds and shot 50.4 percent from the field is pretty remarkable considering Iowa State went 12-20 and 5-13 in the Big 12. Haliburton’s season also ended early due to a fractured wrist suffered against Kansas State on Feb. 8, and postseason play was nixed because of COVID-19.

So who is Tyrese Haliburton?

Well, he is now a 6-foot-5 20-year-old with an estimated 6-8 wingspan who has the tools NBA teams are looking for in a lead guard. With his length, he can guard all three spots on the perimeter and he was one of the best passers in college basketball.
Spoiler:
In 22 games this past season, Haliburton ranked in the 99th percentile in both spot-up shooting and assists in transition, according to Synergy Sports. He averaged 1.4 points per possession and that number increased to 1.6 when left unguarded. He had nine or more assists in six games and is effective in both half-court sets and the open court. His skills were on full display in November in front of several NBA scouts at the Battle 4 Atlantis tournament at Paradise Island in Nassau, Bahamas, where he averaged 10.7 assists in three games.

“After that first tournament down in the Bahamas, it was pretty clear Haliburton would be a high pick in this draft class,” one NBA scout told Yahoo Sports. “His court vision and his high basketball IQ were just so impressive, and those two things stayed consistent all season.”

Haliburton’s jump shot isn’t a cause for concern, but will need some work at the next level. He has a slow windup starting in front of his chest and his elbow flares out a little bit. “If you think my shot now is ugly, my shot when I first got to high school started at my knees,” he told Jonathan Tjarks of the Ringer. “I don’t really care what people say about my shot as long as it’s going in. I know I’m going to have to alter it. I’m altering it right now just because it’s going to be tougher with being guarded more. But this is how I’ve hooped my whole life. And it’s been working. It’s just now about repetition and putting time into it.”

Pelicans point guard Lonzo Ball is an early NBA comp to Haliburton due to his high-level passing and unique shot mechanics. Ball was the second pick in the 2017 NBA draft and has had a decent career in the NBA despite having to modify his jump shot. “Every comparison that I ever see about me until I play my first game is going to be Lonzo. We had basically similar college numbers. I have an unorthodox form like he does, and I’m tall and light-skinned,” Haliburton told Josh Hart on his Lighthearted podcast. “So, you’re always going to hear that comparison. It makes sense. We play similar types of basketball.”

“He’s going to fit in really well wherever he goes because of his character, his humility, his skill level and basketball IQ,” Prohm told Yahoo Sports. “He can play the point guard and he’s an excellent passer, but he’s also versatile enough to play other positions. He can impact that game with or without the ball and then he’ll adjust well just coming in as a rookie and accepting his role.”
In a top-heavy draft with a lot of question marks, Haliburton remains one of the safer players in this class and could offer major upside for the right franchise.
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