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Book Thread. I have nothing good to read.

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dobrojim
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Re: Book Thread. I have nothing good to read. 

Post#281 » by dobrojim » Tue Sep 3, 2019 7:44 pm

This is a really good read that I am almost finished with

What you are getting wrong about Appalachia by Elizabeth Catte

(from Amazon's page describing this book)

In 2016, headlines declared Appalachia ground zero for America's "forgotten tribe" of white working class voters. Journalists flocked to the region to extract sympathetic profiles of families devastated by poverty, abandoned by establishment politics, and eager to consume cheap campaign promises. What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia is a frank assessment of America's recent fascination with the people and problems of the region. The book analyzes trends in contemporary writing on Appalachia, presents a brief history of Appalachia with an eye toward unpacking Appalachian stereotypes, and provides examples of writing, art, and policy created by Appalachians as opposed to for Appalachians. The book offers a must-needed insider's perspective on the region.

Edit to add - this author really goes after Vance's Hillbilly Elegy in a big way. Eye opening.
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Re: Book Thread. I have nothing good to read. 

Post#282 » by payitforward » Tue Sep 3, 2019 9:39 pm

badinage wrote:...supporting an independent bookstore? Like Powell’s out of Portland, or Kramerbooks in DC, or Left Bank Books in St. Louis, or Books and Books in Miami.

They’re all hurting. They need the support. Amazon and the internet are killing them and so much else that matters in the culture.

Too many people seem to think that all they’re there to do is sell product. They’re gathering places, community centers, cultural centers, places to hear ideas and be challenged.

If you are near Georgetown, try the excellent Bridge Street Books. On upper Connecticut, Politics & Prose is also really good. For used books, it's Second Story Books on P st. (& in Rockville). People also speak well of The Lantern for used books -- also on P street but in Georgetown.
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Re: Book Thread. I have nothing good to read. 

Post#283 » by dobrojim » Wed Sep 4, 2019 1:48 pm

FWIW, I have a good friend in Philly who runs a used bookstore that does pretty
well. It's in a very good location near U Penn. Buy books! Or at least read books.
It's good for the mind.
A lot of what we call 'thought' is just mental activity
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Re: Book Thread. I have nothing good to read. 

Post#284 » by Ruzious » Wed Sep 4, 2019 2:10 pm

I could be wrong, but my impression of what's hurt book stores more than anything is Kindle and its copycats. I'm guessing the biggest impact is on the profits to the writers - and they're the people that really need to get paid. Then again, that does cut down on storage and printing costs. Libraries have had to become creative in being more than a place to look at books. Now, they don't anywhere near the book shelves, so they carve out areas for kids to play and adults to have coffee - and provide PC's - somewhat similar to what book stores have done.
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Re: Book Thread. I have nothing good to read. 

Post#285 » by Maf » Wed Sep 4, 2019 3:54 pm

Joseph Heller. Not just Catch XXII. I love Good as Gold even better. The other ones like God knows or Something happenned are good also. Just don't go with Picture this. I was bored whole book and read it only to complete my Heller's book collection.
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Re: Book Thread. I have nothing good to read. 

Post#286 » by payitforward » Wed Sep 4, 2019 4:37 pm

Ruzious wrote:I could be wrong, but my impression of what's hurt book stores more than anything is Kindle and its copycats. I'm guessing the biggest impact is on the profits to the writers - and they're the people that really need to get paid. Then again, that does cut down on storage and printing costs. Libraries have had to become creative in being more than a place to look at books. Now, they don't anywhere near the book shelves, so they carve out areas for kids to play and adults to have coffee - and provide PC's - somewhat similar to what book stores have done.

Very few writers, extremely few, have ever been able to live on royalties from the sales of their books -- & even that was really only during the best years of mass distribution & only for authors of best-sellers or near. Mostly, writers have other jobs. Sometimes they get those jobs because they're writers -- e.g. Faulkner wrote for the movies, lots of novelists & poets teach in colleges/universities, etc.

Sometimes, OTOH, they have unrelated careers: Wallace Stevens was an insurance executive, William Carlos Williams was a pediatrician, etc.

Amazon has hurt bookstores, sure. But, independent bookstores were already complaining that Barnes & Noble hurt them. Bookstore owners are always complaining -- & they always have reasons to complain!

OTOH, the way the retail (new) book business works is unsustainable. Stores order more hard bound books than they'll need. Any they don't sell, they simply pack up & return to the publisher. Publishers routinely pulp large numbers of books that haven't sold as well as anticipated. The environmental & other energy costs don't work for the era we live in.

Amazon certainly hasn't hurt publishers. It lost the fight w/ New York publishing over how much ebooks should cost. These days, buying a kindle edition of a recently-published book costs as much or nearly as much as buying a hard bound printed copy. Any publisher would be delighted to sell more ebooks & fewer printed volumes! The difference in costs is monumental!! Not to mention that most of the revenue goes through to the publisher.

Long-term, ebooks will be good for writers financially, not bad for them. There are already a lot of writers who use ebook-publishing services (from Amazon & others) to cut conventional publishers out of the game -- after all, what value do they add for most writers? Very little. & once printing/distribution are removed.... (I speak from some experience: I was a trade book editor for a major NY publisher in my '20s.)
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Re: Book Thread. I have nothing good to read. 

Post#287 » by Ruzious » Wed Sep 4, 2019 4:51 pm

payitforward wrote:
Ruzious wrote:I could be wrong, but my impression of what's hurt book stores more than anything is Kindle and its copycats. I'm guessing the biggest impact is on the profits to the writers - and they're the people that really need to get paid. Then again, that does cut down on storage and printing costs. Libraries have had to become creative in being more than a place to look at books. Now, they don't anywhere near the book shelves, so they carve out areas for kids to play and adults to have coffee - and provide PC's - somewhat similar to what book stores have done.

Very few writers, extremely few, have ever been able to live on royalties from the sales of their books -- & even that was really only during the best years of mass distribution & only for authors of best-sellers or near. Mostly, writers have other jobs. Sometimes they get those jobs because they're writers -- e.g. Faulkner wrote for the movies, lots of novelists & poets teach in colleges/universities, etc.

Sometimes, OTOH, they have unrelated careers: Wallace Stevens was an insurance executive, William Carlos Williams was a pediatrician, etc.

Amazon has hurt bookstores, sure. But, independent bookstores were already complaining that Barnes & Noble hurt them. Bookstore owners are always complaining -- & they always have reasons to complain!

OTOH, the way the retail (new) book business works is unsustainable. Stores order more hard bound books than they'll need. Any they don't sell, they simply pack up & return to the publisher. Publishers routinely pulp large numbers of books that haven't sold as well as anticipated. The environmental & other energy costs don't work for the era we live in.

Amazon certainly hasn't hurt publishers. It lost the fight w/ New York publishing over how much ebooks should cost. These days, buying a kindle edition of a recently-published book costs as much or nearly as much as buying a hard bound printed copy. Any publisher would be delighted to sell more ebooks & fewer printed volumes! The difference in costs is monumental!! Not to mention that most of the revenue goes through to the publisher.

Long-term, ebooks will be good for writers financially, not bad for them. There are already a lot of writers who use ebook-publishing services (from Amazon & others) to cut conventional publishers out of the game -- after all, what value do they add for most writers? Very little. & once printing/distribution are removed.... (I speak from some experience: I was a trade book editor for a major NY publisher in my '20s.)

Good info - thanks. I just assumed the cost of "buying" a book on Kindle was very small, but you educated me on that. Personally, I'd much rather read a real book than read it on Kindle.
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Re: Book Thread. I have nothing good to read. 

Post#288 » by payitforward » Wed Sep 4, 2019 5:40 pm

Me too. I have a Kindle but barely ever use the thing.
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Re: Book Thread. I have nothing good to read. 

Post#289 » by dobrojim » Wed Sep 4, 2019 8:59 pm

Recently went to Dave Mason/ Hot Tuna at the Warner.

Mason gave a gentle plea towards the end of his show to visit the merch table
and said he would go there himself.

I bring all this up because he also said he makes as much from selling one T-shirt
as from several thousand Spotify streams. So there is another place high tech
and concentration of commercial success has damaged the producers ability to
be compensated for their product.

This is also not far from some of the non abortion related talk in the politics thread.
There is clearly a concentration of power and wealth that is not making it easier
to achieve success.
A lot of what we call 'thought' is just mental activity

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